Upcoming Year Registration

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This is a partial, preview list of classes for 2021-22. New classes are being uploaded daily as details are finalized. Subscribe to Compass’s announcements to receive a notice when the complete list is available. Registration for fall classes will begin on Tuesday, May 18, at 6:00 AM.

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Hugh Gardner
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to world history incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in world history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

The first semester will introduce the Roman way of war beginning with Caesar and examine the Roman conquest of Gaul and invasion of Britain. Students will explore the Celts, Germanic tribes, and other "barbarians." The class will navigate the dark ages and early middle ages, including the collapse of Roman-Britain, the so-called "Age of Arthur," the letters of Saint Patrick, the voyage of Saint Brendan, and the Book of Kells.

This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. Students will be introduced to the art, music, and literature of the times in addition to warfare and politics. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

This is a 14-week (semester) class. It is the first part in a four semester (two-year series). Second semester will include Vikings, Saxons, and Normans, concluding with the epic battles of 1066 and the Bayeux Tapestry (winter/spring 2022). The second year of Medieval study will include Robin Hood, Byzantium, the Rise of Islam and the beginning of the Crusading Era (Fall 2022); the end of the Crusading Era, the Mongols, William Wallace and Robert the Bruce (winter/spring 2023).

Topics in this Series: Early Medieval History: Rise of Roman Empire through 9th c. British Isles (Semester 1), Early Medieval History: The Vikings (Norse), Saxons, and Normans (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Reading assignments will be assigned in class and noted in the weekly e-mail. Assessments: Will not be given. Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase: (1) The Historical Atlas of the Celtic World , by John Haywood, Thames & Hudson, 2009 (Paperback Edition, ISBN 978-0500-28831-3) OR (1)
Atlas of the Celtic World by John Haywood, Thames & Hudson, 2001 (Hardback Edition, ISBN 0-500-05109-7); (2) Patrick The Pilgrim Apostle of Ireland (Analysis of St. Patrick's Confessio and Epistola), by Maire B. De Paor, P.B.V.M., Veritas, Dublin, 1998. (ISBN 0-06-000902-0), and (3) The Voyage of Saint Brendan by John J. O'Mears, trans., Smythe, 1991 (ISBN-13: 978-0851055046). What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned texts. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in world history for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Hugh Gardner
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Students will be immersed in detail and fully engaged in this intensive history course led by well- known homeschool instructor and historian Hugh Gardner. This history class is unlike other high school history course. Instead of learning a sequential set of names, dates, and battles, students will learn how to analyze and interpret history. Much like a college seminar, this approach to world history incorporates historiography (the history of the history.) Mr. Gardner does not teach a narrow view from a single textbook or static set of prepared notes. Instead, he presents the back story and multiple interpretations for the "why" questions in world history. Class discussion considers interpretations from a wide array of scholars and is updated as new sources are published. Rather than running through a timeline of outcomes, students will evaluate contributing factors (the "how" questions) and will learn about the personalities, prejudices, and biases of the people involved ("who").

Second semester, students will examine the Viking Age, Saxon England, and the Normans. The class will culminate with the decisive battles of these three peoples for control of England in 1066. The group will meet Alfred the Great and decipher the Bayeux Tapestry to further their understanding of the period. Just for fun, one class session will be dedicated to Norse games.

This is no ordinary history class as Mr. Gardner surrounds the students with vivid posters, maps, charts, primary sources, and artifacts to supplement his story-telling style. Students will be able to examine and handle period pieces such as antique and replica weapons and military accoutrements of the era while learning how these tools helped shape the battlefields and turning points in history. Students will be introduced to the art, music, and literature of the times in addition to warfare and politics. With an emphasis on primary sources, students will scrutinize historical atlases and original writings, all in a collaborative and interactive setting. Just for fun, students earn historical trading cards for class participation.

This is a 16-week (semester) class. It is the second part in a four semester (two-year series). The second year of Medieval study will include Robin Hood, Byzantium, the Rise of Islam and the beginning of the Crusading Era (Fall 2022); the end of the Crusading Era, the Mongols, William Wallace and Robert the Bruce (winter/spring 2023).

Topics in this Series: Early Medieval History: Rise of Roman Empire through 9th c. British Isles (Semester 1), Early Medieval History: The Vikings (Norse), Saxons, and Normans (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Reading assignments will be assigned in class and noted in the weekly e-mail. Assessments: Will not be given. Textbook/Materials: Students should purchase: (1) The Penguin Historical Atlas of the Vikings by John Haywood, Penguin, 1995. (ISBN 978-0-140-51328-8) and (2) The Vinland Sagas by Keneva Kunz, trans., Penguin, 2008. (ISBN 978-0-140-44776-7) Note: Earlier Penguin editions are not the same.) What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned texts. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in world history for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will find themselves in the castles and keeps of medieval times. Will King Arthur's knights meet the outlaws of Sherwood Forest? Kids will work together to create and perform an original play featuring noble knights, lovely ladies, and swaggering squires.

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Medieval Madness (Quarter 1); Silliest Circus (Quarter 2); Outrageous Outer Space (Quarter 3); and Wacky Wild West (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will voyage into the depths of outer space to create an original play with creative characters like aliens, asteroids, and astronauts. Will they travel to populated planets, strange solar systems, or gargantuan galaxies in their extraterrestrial adventures?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Medieval Madness (Quarter 1); Silliest Circus (Quarter 2); Outrageous Outer Space (Quarter 3); and Wacky Wild West (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will explore flamboyant performers from the circus to create an original, imaginative play featuring hysterical characters. Will they encounter a colorful clown, a jolly juggler, or an adventurous acrobat in their own three-ring circus?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Medieval Madness (Quarter 1); Silliest Circus (Quarter 2); Outrageous Outer Space (Quarter 3); and Wacky Wild West (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will wander into the wild west to develop a unique and original play featuring creative characters. Will they become swashbuckling sheriffs, cool cowboys, or outrageous outlaws in their very own wacky western?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Medieval Madness (Quarter 1); Silliest Circus (Quarter 2); Outrageous Outer Space (Quarter 3); and Wacky Wild West (Quarter 4).

1
Dr. Erica Hughes
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.

This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Following the AP syllabus for this course, students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.

This study of the history of art will begin with the earliest known Christian art, and how its symbols evolved from Old Testament figures while still illegal. The image of Jesus will be traced from a young shepherd reminiscent of Apollo, to a stern Byzantine pantokrator, to a threatening Romanesque judge, to the caring and almost human Gothic hippy Christ. Covering the thousand years from the secretive catacombs of 200 AD through the height of Gothic architecture, the class will examine cross-cultural and pan-European elements of artworks and architecture. Next the study of art will take students to the East, to see the various influences in Byzantine art. Students will learn about the techniques of mosaic and see the grandeur of the Orthodox relics and icons. The influence of contact with Islam through the Crusades will be seen in the periods of iconoclasm.

After considering the differences between Islamic and Muslim arts, the students' exploration will move into the Early Medieval Period to investigate Carolingian and Ottonian painting, furniture and tapestries, and how these were based upon a desire to emulate those of the Roman Empire. The return of sculpture through decorative capitals enclosing cloisters and tympana covering the entranceways to churches is seen in the Romanesque Period, named for the first universalizing style across all of Europe. Finally, the class will reach the Gothic period across Europe to discuss the origins of its name, modifications to cathedrals across the early high and decadent Gothic periods, and compare French with English Gothic styles.

Levels:This course is offered at two levels, On-Level and Honors. They have different workloads, but meet together. Honors students will work at a university freshman level, while on-level students will use the same textbook, but will have less homework.

Topics in this Series: Caves to Colosseum, Prehistoric to Ancient Art (Semester 1), Catacombs to Cathedrals, Western Art Part 1 (Semester 2), Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 3), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 4) Workload: Honors students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class; on-level students should expect to spend 1 hour outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify on the midterm and final. On-level students should be able to identify the art or object by style. Honors students are expected to learn the name, description and compare/contrast the images. Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994). Registration. All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the On-Level or Honors by the first week of class. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from Honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level. Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Dr. Erica Hughes
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.

This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, virtual visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.

This study of the history of art will begin with prehistoric art through Paleolithic examples (image making, cave painting, etc); Neolithic art, created as humans settled into communities such as Jericho and Catalhoyuk; and Megalithic remains like Stonehenge. The class will then move into Near Eastern art looking at examples from around the Fertile Crescent region: Sumerian, Akkadian, Neo-Sumerian, Babylonian, Hittite, Assyrian, Neo-Babylonian, and Sasanian. Next, the study of art will take students to ancient Egypt where art was dominated for millennia by their religion, the ruling pharaohs, and a belief in the afterlife giving them embellish rock-cut tombs, elaborate pyramids, and intricate sarcophagi.

After Egypt, the students' exploration will move into Aegean art including the funeral Cycladic art, Minoan art with frescoes and palaces, and Mycenaean art with its bold fortresses and celebrated Cyclopean masonry. The class will survey the influential art and architecture of Ancient Greece covering the Greek Geometric, Orientalizing, Archaic, Classical, Late Classical, and Hellenistic periods with its emphasis on form, balance, harmony, and an idealized human form on vases, statues, temples, and monuments. Next, students will journey across the Mediterranean to examine Etruscan art and architecture in the Orientalizing and Archaic periods, recognized by terra-cottas, sarcophagi, and bronze sculpture. Finally, the class will reach ancient Rome to view its art and architecture across several periods including the Roman Republic, Early Empire, High Empire, and Late Empire, with emphasis on painting styles, mosaics, and architecture spanning the typical Roman home, triumphal arches, public arenas, and aqueducts.

Levels:This course is offered at two levels, On-Level and Honors. They have different workloads, but meet together. Honors students will work at a university freshman level, while on-level students will use the same textbook, but will have less homework.

Topics in this Series: Caves to Colosseum, Prehistoric to Ancient Art (Semester 1), Catacombs to Cathedrals, Western Art Part 1 (Semester 2), Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 3), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 4) Workload: Honors students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class; on-level students should expect to spend 1 hour outside of class. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify on the midterm and final. On-level students should be able to identify the art or object by style. Honors students are expected to learn the name, description and compare/contrast the images. Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas. Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994). Registration. All students will register online for the same course. Students must designate their intent to take the On-Level or Honors by the first week of class. Once the course has begun, students may move down a level (from Honors to on-level) at any time. However, once classes have begun, students may not "bump up" a level. Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

First quarter, students will construct Animated Animals such as a hopping bunny, lumbering elephant, creeping frog, leaf-munching giraffe, trotting horse, mommy and baby bird, flapping owl, and a prowling, growling tiger.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Fourth quarter, students will model and motorize creepy crawly creatures such as a crab, praying mantis, scorpion, snail, ant, spider, tadpole, and more.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Second quarter, modern robotics will bring extinct Jurassic world to life with projects such a Brachiosaur, T-Rex, Megalodon Shark, Pterodactyl and their current cousins- the Komodo Dragon and Crocodile.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Third quarter, rush hour comes to Compass as students build and program automated vehicles like a dune buggy, Formula 1 race car, tow truck, tractor trailer, bus, and more.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

LEGO Mindstorms components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set!

Second quarter, students will discover what happens when simple machines are combined to work together. They will be challenged to develop a unique, individual segment of a maze that moves a ball from point A to point B, and each segment will link to a classmate's invention to keep the ball moving! They will use complex machines (compounded simple machines) with additional motors and more components to move the ball through a series of lifts, automated carts, moving gates, escalators, and more! Will each contraption transfer the ball to its neighbor without hitting the floor? Can they pass the ball to their neighbor without hitting the floor? This project is inspired by the LEGO Great Ball Contraption competition, which is similar to Rube Goldberg inventions. See http://greatballcontraption.com/ or You Tube videos for impressive examples of the Great Ball Contraption. Second quarter students will be challenged to build bigger, better, more complex contraptions with compound machines and more mechanization!

Topics in this Series: Marble Mazes (Quarter 1); Crazy Contraptions (Quarter 2): Gadgets & Gizmos (Quarter 3); and Widgets and Whatsits (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

LEGO Mindstorms components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set!

Each week, students will build a new gadget or gizmo like a mechanized inchworm, a ball shooter, a claw, an insect-like crawler, and more. Students will incorporate simple machines, complex machines, and small motors into their projects. They will work with new parts, more gears, and specialty pieces that they have not used even in prior 'Build It Better' classes.

Topics in this Series: Marble Mazes (Quarter 1); Crazy Contraptions (Quarter 2): Gadgets & Gizmos (Quarter 3); and Widgets and Whatsits (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

LEGO Mindstorms components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set!

First quarter, students will be challenged to develop a unique, individual segment of a maze that moves a ball from point A to point B, and each segment will link to a classmate's invention to keep the ball moving! They will be challenged to incorporate as many simple machines as possible into their maze. They will learn about levers, inclined planes, wheel and axle, wedges, screws, and pulleys while inventing. Can they move a ball through a maze with a ramp (inclined plane), a flipper (lever), or lowered bucket (pulley) without using their hands? Can they pass the ball to their neighbor without hitting the floor? This project is inspired by the LEGO Great Ball Contraption competition, which is similar to Rube Goldberg inventions. See http://greatballcontraption.com/ or You Tube videos for impressive examples of the Great Ball Contraption. Second quarter students will be challenged to build bigger, better, more complex contraptions with compound machines and more mechanization!

Topics in this Series: Marble Mazes (Quarter 1); Crazy Contraptions (Quarter 2): Gadgets & Gizmos (Quarter 3); and Widgets and Whatsits (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

LEGO Mindstorms components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set!

Each week, students will build a new widget or "whatsit" creation like a functioning scissor lift, a creeping spider, or a gripper. Engineer a mechanized doodler, a spirograph machine, and more. Students will incorporate simple machines, complex machines, and small motors into their projects. They will work with new parts, more gears, and specialty pieces that they have not used even in prior 'Build It Better' classes.

Topics in this Series: Marble Mazes (Quarter 1); Crazy Contraptions (Quarter 2): Gadgets & Gizmos (Quarter 3); and Widgets and Whatsits (Quarter 4).

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment for either a laboratory or field setting, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and to record and analyze data.

During first quarter, students will design experiments relating to animal behavior. Possible areas of investigation include behavior at the individual level (such as substrate selection with pill bugs or millipedes); learned behavior with planaria; foraging and habitat preferences with hermit crabs; territoriality among betta fish or hissing cockroaches; or social behavior with ant colonies. Others may design experiments that test intraspecific interactions, predator-prey relationships, or animal competition.

Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized the results in a poster, and will present their data to the class. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science. Topics in this Series: Animal Behavior (Quarter 1), Chemistry (Quarter 2), Microscopic (Quarter 3), and Environmental Science (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment for either a laboratory or field setting, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and to record and analyze data.

During second quarter, students will design experiments relating to chemistry! Our focus will be on chemical reactions that we observe in everyday life and/or hear about in the news. Students will design experiments that test the chemistry of food, household products, or environmental agents. Possible areas of investigation include the effects of street runoff on water quality, how increasing levels of carbon dioxide change the acidity of freshwater and seawater, and the effects of acid rain on plant growth.

Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized the results in a poster, and will present their data to the class. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science. Topics in this Series: Animal Behavior (Quarter 1), Chemistry (Quarter 2), Microscopic (Quarter 3), and Environmental Science (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment for either a laboratory or field setting, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and to record and analyze data.

Fourth quarter, students will investigate an aspect of environmental science such as water quality, air pollution, contaminants affecting native species, or man-made materials affecting the indoor environment. Depending on thier area of focus, students may use microscopes, spectrometers, or other equipment and learn to keep science journals/notebooks.

Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized the results in a poster, and will present their data to the class. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science. Topics in this Series: Animal Behavior (Quarter 1), Chemistry (Quarter 2), Microscopic (Quarter 3), and Environmental Science (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

In this class, middle school students will learn to work as independent investigators using the scientific method. Students will observe the systems under investigation, choose a pattern or trend that interests them, and then develop a testable hypothesis. Students will learn how to: design a scientific experiment for either a laboratory or field setting, choose appropriate controls, minimize investigator bias, correctly perform measurements and to record and analyze data.

Third quarter will focus on investigations of small and/or microscopic organisms such as Planaria, Euglena, brine shrimp and tardigrades (water bears). Students will spend time using microscopes, making slides, and learning to keep science journals/notebooks. Our overall themes will be understanding processes that are important for organisms' survival at the microscopic scale, and comparing these lifestyles and adaptations to those from macro-scale ecological communities with which students are more familiar.

Students will learn how to locate peer-reviewed scientific literature to research their subject. By the end of the quarter, students will have completed their independent investigations, summarized the results in a poster, and will present their data to the class. Each quarter will focus on a different aspect of science. Topics in this Series: Animal Behavior (Quarter 1), Chemistry (Quarter 2), Microscopic (Quarter 3), and Environmental Science (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Paris. Milan. Madrid. What's on the runways in 2021? Wide disco collars, chic trench coats, and layered skirts in simmering neons, crochet knits, and faux leather. Do you study the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Marie Claire, and wish to be involved in the world of trendy fashion? Perhaps you follow fashion influencers on Instagram. Or, do you enjoy the satisfaction of designing apparel yourself, your way? If so, this class is for you. Each week this course will cover two aspects: the history of fashion and fashion design.

Fashion trends are often cyclical, and elements of style are reimagined every few decades. Students will seek inspiration for new designs and style remixes by learning about the history of fashion in eastern and western cultures for the last century. First semester, students will look at fashion trends by decade from 1900 through the 1960s. This semester will cover chapters 1 through 3 in the textbook.

With inspiration from historical design trends, students will learn how to create fashion renderings, from initial concepts through a chic, coordinated collection. First semester, the class will learn about color theory, color psychology, and composing color palettes. They will learn to draw their designs by sketching a croquis (a quick, rough sketch of a garments on a proportioned figure.) Students will practice vision boarding and developing a story board. This class does not include sewing the fashions.

Topics in this Series: Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History I (Semester 1), Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and completing design activities.

Assignments: Projects and readings will be given out in class and will also be communicated via email.

Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

Textbook: Students should purchase Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, by Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale (ISBN# 978-1474270007) before the first class. Additional information will be distributed as handouts in class.

Lab/Supply Fee: None.

What to Bring: Images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

London. New York. Tokyo. What will be on the runways in 2022? Statement coats, full-body capes, tailored suits, layered skirts, vests, metallic detailing, iridescent fabrics and natural fibers. Do you study the pages of Glamour, Vogue, Marie Claire, and wish to be involved in the world of trendy fashion? Perhaps you follow fashion influencers on Instagram. Or, do you enjoy the satisfaction of making things yourself, your way? If so, this class is for you. Each week this course will cover three parallel tracks: the history of fashion, fashion design, and sewing, with the first hour of each class being lessons and design work and the second hour dedicated to application and sewing.

Fashion trends are often cyclical, and elements of style are reimagined every few decades. Students will seek inspiration for new designs and style remixes by learning about the history of fashion in eastern and western cultures for the last century. Second semester, students will examine fashion trends by decade from the 1970s through the 2000s. The class will also highlight the work of influential designers such as Charles Frederick Worth, Gabrielle Chanel, Christian Dior, Valentino, Kenzo Takada, Prada, and others. This semester will cover chapters 4 and 5 in the textbook.

With inspiration from historical design trends, students will learn how to create fashion renderings, from initial concepts through a chic, coordinated collection. Second semester, students' design work will focus on creating a collection and sharing those designs through a collection story board. The class will also culminate with presentation of designs and a discussion of related careers including fashion design, art, graphic design, advertising, merchandising, costuming, manufacturing, retail work or virtual style influencer.

Topics in this Series: Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History I (Semester 1), Stellar Style: Fashion Design & History II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on reading assignments and completing design activities.

Assignments: Projects and readings will be given out in class and will also be communicated via email.

Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.

Textbook: Students should purchase Fundamentals of Fashion Design, 3rd Edition, by Richard Sorger and Jenny Udale (ISBN# 978-1474270007) before the first class. Additional information will be distributed as handouts in class.

Lab/Supply Fee: None.

What to Bring: Images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior artist will explore fun and interesting art processes through a variety of medieval art projects such as a crown craft, make our own parchment paper, design a code of arms and make a custom shield to name a few.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior artist will explore fun and interesting art processes through a variety of medieval art projects such as a crown craft, make our own parchment paper, design a code of arms and make a custom shield to name a few.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior artists will explore fun and unique art processes through a variety of mixed media projects such as tint and shade ice cream cones, cut paper art, quilt and tile inspired art, and amazing illusion art.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior artists will explore fun and unique art processes through a variety of mixed media projects such as tint and shade ice cream cones, cut paper art, quilt and tile inspired art, and amazing illusion art.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior arts will explore the art works of the famous artists whose work is on display in the beautiful outdoor garden of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Exhibited artists include Smith, Calder, Miro, Burton, Lichtenstein, Flanagan, LeWitt, Bourgeois, Oldenburg, Shapiro, Kelly, Graft, Abakanowicz and DiSuvero. Projects will be representative of the theme, form, or art mediums of the week's featured artist. Example projects are a 4-sided pyramid, grafted tree, and a spider sculpture.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior arts will explore the art works of the famous artists whose work is on display in the beautiful outdoor garden of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Exhibited artists include Smith, Calder, Miro, Burton, Lichtenstein, Flanagan, LeWitt, Bourgeois, Oldenburg, Shapiro, Kelly, Graft, Abakanowicz and DiSuvero. Projects will be representative of the theme, form, or art mediums of the week's featured artist. Example projects are a 4-sided pyramid, grafted tree, and a spider sculpture.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior Artists will study and create art that showcases winter with projects such as aerial view snowman, winter trees snow painting, polar bear art process, newspaper winter landscape, and fold, and print winter reflection. They will examine samples from artist who worked in similar material themes or styles.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior Artists will study and create art that showcases winter with projects such as aerial view snowman, winter trees snow painting, polar bear art process, newspaper winter landscape, and fold, and print winter reflection. They will examine samples from artist who worked in similar material themes or styles.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Laura Adler
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

When disaster strikes, robots are often used in environments that would be too hazardous or inaccessible to rescue crews. In preparation for the next earthquake, tornado, or flood, students will construct a disaster response robot. They will work in small teams to design, build, and program prototype rescue robots that can maneuver through or clear rubble, find survivors (using temperature and IR sensors), turn off leaking valves, retrieve unsafe materials, and other emergency response tasks.

The class will focus on construction and programming, with an emphasis on the design of functional robots. The rovers will be programmed to sense and react to the environment and to complete a series of missions on a pre-defined course. Students will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook. Each robot will be put through a series of tests/challenges related to the specific robot design. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects.

Topics in this Series: Mars Rover (Semester 1) and Disaster Response Robots (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None. Students with no prior experience in robotics or programming are welcome.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class researching robot and automation design

Assessments: Ongoing feedback is provided in class on construction and programming. Formal assessments are not provided.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Laura Adler
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Following in the footsteps of NASA's latest Perseverance Rover (and its predecessors Sojourner, Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity) in the race to the red planet, students will construct a robotic Mars rover in this project-based class. They will work in small teams to design, build, and program prototype rovers that operate with multiple axles and independently powered wheels. Rovers will have cameras (to film the Martian surface) and will be constructed to collect samples, climb craters, traverse sandy and rocky terrain, and re-route around boulders and obstacles.

The class will focus on construction and programming, with an emphasis on the design of functional robots. The rovers will be programmed to sense and react to the environment and to complete a series of missions on a pre-defined course. Students will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Teams will conduct research, apply the engineering design process, follow the general rules and conventions of the engineering profession, including maintaining an engineering notebook. Each robot will be put through a series of tests/challenges related to the specific robot design. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects. Please note that students do not get to keep finished projects.

Topics in this Series: Mars Rover (Semester 1) and Disaster Response Robots (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.

Prerequisites: None. Students with no prior experience in robotics or programming are welcome.

Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class researching robot and automation design

Assessments: Ongoing feedback is provided in class on construction and programming. Formal assessments are not provided.

Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of early American history, from Washington's spies to British double agents, using an RPGs (role playing game) custom designed by the instructor.

Real spying is less James Bond and more Sherlock Holmes. You follow clues and codes to lead you to secrets your enemies wish you did not know. Every country has secrets, and those must be defended, because knowing is half the battle. Students will be expected to learn about and practice code-breaking and try to encode messages to pass to their colleagues. Success will bring great advantage; failure could mean capture and death! We will examine the lives and techniques of real historical spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other using a modified version of the Pathfinder story-driven role playing system. Once students have uncovered the enemy's secrets, we will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge.

Topics in this Series: The History of Espionage, America's First Spies- Rev. War (Semester 1) and The History of Espionage, Modern Deception-WWII (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of World War II from French underground resistance schemes to Soviet spies in Germany; from the Nazi Enigma machine to Navajo code talkers, using an RPG (role playing game) custom designed by the instructor.

Real spying is less James Bond and more Sherlock Holmes. You follow clues and codes to lead you to secrets your enemies wish you did not know. Every country has secrets, and those must be defended, because knowing is half the battle. Students will be expected to learn about and practice code-breaking and try to encode messages to pass to their colleagues. Success will bring great advantage; failure could mean capture and death! We will examine the lives and techniques of real historical spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other using a modified version of the Pathfinder story-driven role playing system. Once students have uncovered the enemy's secrets, we will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge.

Topics in this Series: The History of Espionage, America's First Spies- Rev. War (Semester 1) and The History of Espionage, Modern Deception-WWII (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. From dawn to dusk, what happened to make an ordinary weekday turn into a fabulously funny, frivolous, freaky Friday?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other, then read through the two, prepared scripts together. Through group activities and guided discussion, they will create new characters, brainstorm variations, craft plot changes, add lines, and cast their parts. The instructor will then update and customize the class script with the students' input.

The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

Topics in this Series: Secrets and Spies (Quarter 1), Time Travel Tale (Quarter 2), Super Duper New Superheroes (Quarter 3), and Freaky Friday (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. Will they practice sneaky surveillance with sly spies and astute agents in their own undercover adventure?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other, then read through the two, prepared scripts together. Through group activities and guided discussion, they will create new characters, brainstorm variations, craft plot changes, add lines, and cast their parts. The instructor will then update and customize the class script with the students' input.

The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

Topics in this Series: Secrets and Spies (Quarter 1), Time Travel Tale (Quarter 2), Super Duper New Superheroes (Quarter 3), and Freaky Friday (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. Will their superheroes have super speed or stupendous strength? What happens when these characters collide with vicious villains?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other, then read through the two, prepared scripts together. Through group activities and guided discussion, they will create new characters, brainstorm variations, craft plot changes, add lines, and cast their parts. The instructor will then update and customize the class script with the students' input.

The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

Topics in this Series: Secrets and Spies (Quarter 1), Time Travel Tale (Quarter 2), Super Duper New Superheroes (Quarter 3), and Freaky Friday (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. Will kids meet historical heroes, ancient animals, or explore the far-flung future in their time travel tale?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other, then read through the two, prepared scripts together. Through group activities and guided discussion, they will create new characters, brainstorm variations, craft plot changes, add lines, and cast their parts. The instructor will then update and customize the class script with the students' input.

The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.

Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.

Topics in this Series: Secrets and Spies (Quarter 1), Time Travel Tale (Quarter 2), Super Duper New Superheroes (Quarter 3), and Freaky Friday (Quarter 4).

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior artist will explore fun and interesting art processes through a variety of medieval art projects such as a crown craft, make our own parchment paper, design a code of arms and make a custom shield to name a few.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior artist will explore fun and interesting art processes through a variety of medieval art projects such as a crown craft, make our own parchment paper, design a code of arms and make a custom shield to name a few.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior artists will explore fun and unique art processes through a variety of mixed media projects such as tint and shade ice cream cones, cut paper art, quilt and tile inspired art, and amazing illusion art.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior artists will explore fun and unique art processes through a variety of mixed media projects such as tint and shade ice cream cones, cut paper art, quilt and tile inspired art, and amazing illusion art.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior arts will explore the art works of the famous artists whose work is on display in the beautiful outdoor garden of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Exhibited artists include Smith, Calder, Miro, Burton, Lichtenstein, Flanagan, LeWitt, Bourgeois, Oldenburg, Shapiro, Kelly, Graft, Abakanowicz and DiSuvero. Projects will be representative of the theme, form, or art mediums of the week's featured artist. Example projects are a 4-sided pyramid, grafted tree, and a spider sculpture.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior arts will explore the art works of the famous artists whose work is on display in the beautiful outdoor garden of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Exhibited artists include Smith, Calder, Miro, Burton, Lichtenstein, Flanagan, LeWitt, Bourgeois, Oldenburg, Shapiro, Kelly, Graft, Abakanowicz and DiSuvero. Projects will be representative of the theme, form, or art mediums of the week's featured artist. Example projects are a 4-sided pyramid, grafted tree, and a spider sculpture.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior Artists will study and create art that showcases winter with projects such as aerial view snowman, winter trees snow painting, polar bear art process, newspaper winter landscape, and fold, and print winter reflection. They will examine samples from artist who worked in similar material themes or styles.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Kerry Diederich
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.

Junior Artists will study and create art that showcases winter with projects such as aerial view snowman, winter trees snow painting, polar bear art process, newspaper winter landscape, and fold, and print winter reflection. They will examine samples from artist who worked in similar material themes or styles.

Topics in this Series: Mixed Media Makers (Quarter 1); National Gallery Garden (Quarter 2); Whimsical Winter Works (Quarter 3); Kings and Queens- Kids' Medieval Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Earth is an ocean planet! Life began in the oceans, and they are the linchpin of the biological, chemical, and physical processes that allow our planet to support life. This class will give students a basic understanding of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth's oceans. We'll also learn how oceans are informing our search for life on other planets. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

During the second quarter, students will take a detailed look at the amazing variety of marine habitats around the world. We'll explore marine biomes that are found along the coasts: tropical coral reef systems, temperate kelp forests, tidal communitites, salt marshes, mangrove forests, and rocky shores. The geographic distribution, food webs, important primary producers and consumers, representative species, and notable species interactions for each biome will be discussed and compared to other marine and terrestrial biomes. Over the course of the quarter, students will assemble a "ship's log" of our virtual expedition which will include a map of the ocean biomes of the earth, with detailed sections on each biome we investigate.

Topics in this Series: Oceanography (Quarter 1); Coastal Biomes (Quarter 2); Open Water Habitats (Quarter 3); and Marine Animal Close-Up (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Earth is an ocean planet! Life began in the oceans, and they are the linchpin of the biological, chemical, and physical processes that allow our planet to support life. This class will give students a basic understanding of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth's oceans. We'll also learn how oceans are informing our search for life on other planets. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

During the fourth quarter, we'll be moving from a big picture perspective, looking at ecology and biomes, to focus in on individual species and how they live. We'll trace the evolution of the major groups of marine plants and animals, to see how their morphology and adaptations became more complex and diverse over time. The class will zoom in on representative species, let students vote on the most interesting, and compile a Case Studies science log that profiles these species. We'll also have a chance to observe and interact with living aquatic organisms in our classroom. Come meet bioluminescent dinoflagellates and feed an anemone!

Topics in this Series: Oceanography (Quarter 1); Coastal Biomes (Quarter 2); Open Water Habitats (Quarter 3); and Marine Animal Close-Up (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Earth is an ocean planet! Life began in the oceans, and they are the linchpin of the biological, chemical, and physical processes that allow our planet to support life. This class will give students a basic understanding of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth's oceans. We'll also learn how oceans are informing our search for life on other planets. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

In first quarter Oceanography, students will examine physical processes such as the global ocean circulation and the role of oceans on the planet's weather patterns, temperatures, salinity, and major ocean currents. The class will discover the physics of the ocean including light and waves, along with some the oceans' primary chemistry processes like carbon dioxide sequestration and nitrogen cycling. Students will learn about the geography of the ocean basins, mid-ocean ridges, plate tectonics, and island formation, along with the habitable zones: wetlands, intertidal, sub-tidal nearshore, photic zone of the open ocean, and deep sea.

Topics in this Series: Oceanography (Quarter 1); Coastal Biomes (Quarter 2); Open Water Habitats (Quarter 3); and Marine Animal Close-Up (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Earth is an ocean planet! Life began in the oceans, and they are the linchpin of the biological, chemical, and physical processes that allow our planet to support life. This class will give students a basic understanding of the chemistry, physics and biology of earth's oceans. We'll also learn how oceans are informing our search for life on other planets. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

During the third quarter, students will continue to examine the amazing variety of marine habitats around the world. We'll explore marine habitats that are found in the open ocean (or limnetic zones) including near surface and deep water biomes, abyssal plains, deep trenches, hydrothermal vents, and polar waters. The geographic distribution, food webs, important primary producers and consumers, representative species, and notable species interactions for each biome will be discussed and compared to other marine and terrestrial biomes. Over the course of the quarter, students will assemble a "ship's log" of our virtual expedition which will include a map of the ocean biomes of the earth, with detailed sections on each biome we investigate.

Topics in this Series: Oceanography (Quarter 1); Coastal Biomes (Quarter 2); Open Water Habitats (Quarter 3); and Marine Animal Close-Up (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic warrior which can battle other robots in the class on a tabletop arena. Each week, students will improve their robots though the addition of new sensors and components will program their creations to withstand different battle attacks.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic warrior which can battle other robots in the class on a tabletop arena. Each week, students will improve their robots though the addition of new sensors and components will program their creations to withstand different battle attacks.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic vehicle to simulate a lunar lander which can traverse an uneven terrain and collect "moon rocks." Each week, students will improve their landers though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their creations to complete changing lunar challenges.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic vehicle to simulate a lunar lander which can traverse an uneven terrain and collect "moon rocks." Each week, students will improve their landers though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their creations to complete changing lunar challenges.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic arm to simulate a factory assembly line. Each week, students will improve their robotic arms though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their devices to complete challenging manufacturing tasks.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic arm to simulate a factory assembly line. Each week, students will improve their robotic arms though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their devices to complete challenging manufacturing tasks.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Design, build, and program an explorer robot to navigate newly discovered, unmapped ancient tomb. Each week, students will improve their robots though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their devices to navigate a maze and collect treasure.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Design, build, and program an explorer robot to navigate newly discovered, unmapped ancient tomb. Each week, students will improve their robots though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their devices to navigate a maze and collect treasure.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Sarah Fraser
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

p>Quizzes, tests, homework, projects, reports, teams, clubs, jobs, internships, volunteer work, applications, life decisions arghhh! The demands of high school can be overwhelming or downright intimidating to most teens, even those who are homeschooled! And guess what? That variety of new responsibilities and expectations doesn t go away. They will likely increase in the later years of high school and into college. But don t worry- there are strategies and core skills that will help prepare a teen for success in high school and beyond.

Study skills and college success basics include a toolbox of key life skills that will help your teen tackle high school and prepare for college. These skills are taught through in-class activities, some at-home trials, and by evaluating best practices. They are not taught as a one-size-fits all, but rather a range of options to accomplish the same thing for individual learners and different learning styles. Skills that will be addressed in this class include time management skills and tools like planners, to-do lists, calendars, and reminders- paper or electronic- what are the options, and what works best? Students will look at ways to manage short-term and long-term assignments; setting goals; how to break a bigger project into manageable steps and milestones; and how to avoid procrastination. The class will also learn fundamentals such as how to tackle a new chapter, read to retain, recall details, annotate, make margin notes, and take notes from readings, lectures, or videos; outline, and the art of brainstorming. Students will learn how to study and prepare for tests.

In their toolbox, teens will also learn soft skills needed in school such as communicating and coordinating with a team on group projects and how to ask for information from teachers, employers, and other adults. The group will complete a career inventory and think about what they might be interested in doing in the future and will get tips on internships, mentor relationships, and options for junior/senior summer or a gap year. Finally, the class will look at sleep, diet, stress, screen time, and other personal habits that can impact a teen's work and effectiveness.

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of early American history, from Washington's spies to British double agents, using an RPGs (role playing game) custom designed by the instructor.

Real spying is less James Bond and more Sherlock Holmes. You follow clues and codes to lead you to secrets your enemies wish you did not know. Every country has secrets, and those must be defended, because knowing is half the battle. Students will be expected to learn about and practice code-breaking and try to encode messages to pass to their colleagues. Success will bring great advantage; failure could mean capture and death! We will examine the lives and techniques of real historical spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other using a modified version of the Pathfinder story-driven role playing system. Once students have uncovered the enemy's secrets, we will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge.

Topics in this Series: The History of Espionage, America's First Spies- Rev. War (Semester 1) and The History of Espionage, Modern Deception-WWII (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of World War II from French underground resistance schemes to Soviet spies in Germany; from the Nazi Enigma machine to Navajo code talkers, using an RPG (role playing game) custom designed by the instructor.

Real spying is less James Bond and more Sherlock Holmes. You follow clues and codes to lead you to secrets your enemies wish you did not know. Every country has secrets, and those must be defended, because knowing is half the battle. Students will be expected to learn about and practice code-breaking and try to encode messages to pass to their colleagues. Success will bring great advantage; failure could mean capture and death! We will examine the lives and techniques of real historical spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other using a modified version of the Pathfinder story-driven role playing system. Once students have uncovered the enemy's secrets, we will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge.

Topics in this Series: The History of Espionage, America's First Spies- Rev. War (Semester 1) and The History of Espionage, Modern Deception-WWII (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Find fascinating things in late fall! Hike through piles of fallen leaves. See farther through the bare branches. Look for evidence of animals getting ready for winter and birds migrating to warmer locales. Discover changes in plant life, observe stream ecology, and watch for changes in the weather!

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Find fascinating things in late fall! Hike through piles of fallen leaves. See farther through the bare branches. Look for evidence of animals getting ready for winter and birds migrating to warmer locales. Discover changes in plant life, observe stream ecology, and watch for changes in the weather!

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Experience the thrill of spring- nature's fastest paced season! Watch as the forest transforms each week with new leaves, flowers, nests, and the full stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, enjoying bird-song, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and the fresh spring air.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Experience the thrill of spring- nature's fastest paced season! Watch as the forest transforms each week with new leaves, flowers, nests, and the full stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, enjoying bird-song, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and the fresh spring air.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

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Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

What happens when Alice falls asleep playing solitaire on the computer? In this modern retelling of a children's classic, she is awakened by a white rabbit and meets the Cheshire Cat who welcomes her to Cyberland. As the visitor to this digital world, Alice must go on a techno-journey to meet the Queen of Hearts and get a special password to return through her computer.

The class will cast, practice, and perform the cyber play in an interactive, virtual setting for an online audience, yet students will communicate as if they're all in the same place together. The selected script was specifically written for virtual theater. New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with costumes, props, and backdrops when the show is literally happening in their own home.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter online.

Topics in this Series: Alice in Cyberland (Quarter 1); Sherlock Holmes, a Radio Mystery (Quarter 2); If They Could Talk (Quarter 3); Goose Napped (Quarter 4)

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

This mystery will give you goosebumps! Trenchcoat-clad private eye Jo August, is hired for the case of a missing, uh, mother which turns into a wild goose chase. Turns out Mother Goose is the alleged victim, and the suspects include Old MacDonald, Georgie Porgie, Jack and Jill, Humpty Dumpty, and Peter and his wife. The detective discovers that every character has a motive. Will the perpetrator be found? Will his goose be cooked? Will she have egg on her face? The virtual audiences will be delighted by the funny plot twist and an un-eggs-pected ending.

The class will cast, practice, and perform the cyber play in an interactive, virtual setting for an online audience, yet students will communicate as if they're all in the same place together. The selected script was specifically written for virtual theater. New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with costumes, props, and backdrops when the show is literally happening in their own home.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter online.

Topics in this Series: Alice in Cyberland (Quarter 1); Sherlock Holmes, a Radio Mystery (Quarter 2); If They Could Talk (Quarter 3); Goose Napped (Quarter 4)

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Imagine that the last chocolate chip cookie pleads with you not to ear it! The math book begs to be studied. The toys that ask to remain on the floor. Discover the mixed-up world of Taylor, a teen who acquires the ability to hear what the objects and animals around her are saying. Are Taylor's ears burning when hears what the cat really thinks of the family? Or, does she keep an ear to the ground to find out what everyone and everything around her is planning?

The class will cast, practice, and perform the cyber play in an interactive, virtual setting for an online audience, yet students will communicate as if they're all in the same place together. The selected script was specifically written for virtual theater. New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with costumes, props, and backdrops when the show is literally happening in their own home.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter online.

Topics in this Series: Alice in Cyberland (Quarter 1); Sherlock Holmes, a Radio Mystery (Quarter 2); If They Could Talk (Quarter 3); Goose Napped (Quarter 4)

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Whodunit? The world's most famous detective, Sherlock Holmes, is hired by the king to retrieve an incriminating photograph of his old flame in this modern adaption of Arthur Conan Doyle's A Scandal in Bohemia. Find out what happens when Sherlock Holmes faces mysteries even he cannot solve! Even the audience will be left puzzled.

The class will cast, practice, and perform the cyber play in an interactive, virtual setting for an online audience, yet students will communicate as if they're all in the same place together. The selected script was specifically written for virtual theater. New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with costumes, props, and backdrops when the show is literally happening in their own home.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter online.

Topics in this Series: Alice in Cyberland (Quarter 1); Sherlock Holmes, a Radio Mystery (Quarter 2); If They Could Talk (Quarter 3); Goose Napped (Quarter 4)

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

A glimpse of the Marvel Universe comes to stage! In this "marvelous" scripted play for school theater, actors and audience will learn some of the backstories of their favorite superheroes.

You know Thor as the God of Thunder, Master of the Storm, and heir to the kingdom Asgard, and Loki as the Norse God of Mischief and Thor's most worthy opponent. Travel back in time, through the magic of stage, to meet Thor and Loki as teenagers! Before they were superhero and supervillain they were feuding brothers, pulling pranks on each other, creating mischief and fighting for their parents' favor. Watch as Thor struggles with exams and Loki tackles high school troubles. Despite their rivalry, the two princes of Asgard have a bond that will last a "super" long time.

This script comes from Marvel Spotlight, a collection of plays from the Marvel Universe. Students, along with their acting instructor, will cast, rehearse, and coordinate a class performance of this comedy. Students will be encouraged to design and assemble simple costumes, props, and backdrops from items at home. Student actors will be expected to learn their lines and participate fully. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the semester.

Topics in this Series: Hammered: A Thor and Loki Play (Marvel Spotlight)- Semester 1; Mirror of Most Value: A Ms Marvel Play (Marvel Spotlight)- Semester 2. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Material Fee The cost of the script license is included in the course fee.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

A glimpse of the Marvel Universe comes to stage! In this "marvelous" scripted play for school theater, actors and audience will learn some of the backstories of their favorite superheroes.

Meet Kamala Khan- a regular, 16-year old high school student from Jersey City. Before she was Ms Marvel, the sidekick of Carol Danvers' Captain Marvel, she was an awkward, nerdy teen. Kamala Khan struggles with her strict parents, her schoolwork, AND her superpowers. She tries to balance fighting crimes and physics class. When Kamala decides to boost her alter ego's image by writing her own Ms Marvel fan fiction, she starts to lose track of what really matters- her studies and her relationships. Join young Ms Marvel as she learns to accept herself and figures out what kind of hero she will be.

This script comes from Marvel Spotlight, a collection of plays from the Marvel Universe. Students, along with their acting instructor, will cast, rehearse, and coordinate a class performance of this comedy. Students will be encouraged to design and assemble simple costumes, props, and backdrops from items at home. Student actors will be expected to learn their lines and participate fully. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the semester.

Topics in this Series: Hammered: A Thor and Loki Play (Marvel Spotlight)- Semester 1; Mirror of Most Value: A Ms Marvel Play (Marvel Spotlight)- Semester 2. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Material Fee The cost of the script license is included in the course fee.

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

This class will explore the judicial processes of the ancient world, starting with Ancient Greece. Students will learn how justice was carried out in a time before codified written legal systems, prisons, lawyers, or even formal judges existed and where the facts of your case depended entirely on how well your rhetoric could convince hundreds of your fellow citizens that would serve on a jury. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves, but will be expected to do so as an Ancient Greek citizen would have, through open debate. Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of both citizen and non-citizen residents of an ancient Polis. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions.

Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Ancient Greece (Semester 1); Roman law, From Republic to Empire (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Textbooks: Students should purchase a copy of: Select Orations of Lysias by James Morris Whiton (ISBN# 9780530892238 at Barnes & Noble online). Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of photocopied class documents is included in the course fee.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

This class will explore the judicial processes of the Roman Republic. Starting with the Regicide of the Tarquin King, followed by the first legal code, the Laws of the 12 Tables, all the way to the Codes of Emperor Justinian. This Semester will explore the foundation of the Roman Legal system that endures in some forms to this day. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Plebes and Senators of ancient Rome. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy.

Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Ancient Greece (Semester 1); Roman law, From Republic to Empire (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation. Textbooks: None Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of photocopied class documents is included in the course fee.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

First quarter, students will construct Animated Animals such as a hopping bunny, lumbering elephant, creeping frog, leaf-munching giraffe, trotting horse, mommy and baby bird, flapping owl, and a prowling, growling tiger.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Fourth quarter, students will model and motorize creepy crawly creatures such as a crab, praying mantis, scorpion, snail, ant, spider, tadpole, and more.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Second quarter, modern robotics will bring extinct Jurassic world to life with projects such a Brachiosaur, T-Rex, Megalodon Shark, Pterodactyl and their current cousins- the Komodo Dragon and Crocodile.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Third quarter, rush hour comes to Compass as students build and program automated vehicles like a dune buggy, Formula 1 race car, tow truck, tractor trailer, bus, and more.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Edwige Pinover
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Salut! French with Friends is an introductory French class for elementary-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Edwige Pinover
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Salut! French with Friends is an introductory French class for elementary-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Edwige Pinover
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Salut! French with Friends is an introductory French class for elementary-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Edwige Pinover
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Salut! French with Friends is an introductory French class for elementary-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Fourth quarter, students will learn some basics biology, using their powers of observation and digital microscopes to investigate plants and animals from the grounds. The class will discuss how these organisms survive and adapt. As entomologists, they will take an up-close look at insects and discover the many important ecological functions that they perform, from nutrient cycling to pollination. Guest insects will include pillbugs, millipedes, Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and an ant farm. To emphasize the topic of nutrient cycling, students will also make their own worm farms to take home to observe and apply the basics of composting household waste.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Third quarter, we will learn some basics of chemistry and medical science. Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change. They will intersperse their chemistry experiments with studies of medical science. The class will review the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy. The group will discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick. Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we're able to grow. After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we'll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs!

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

First quarter, we will learn some basics of paleontology and geology. Students will learn about the science and methods of paleontology as they prepare for a mock fossil dig. They will handle real fossils, learn how fossilization occurs, and simulate excavating fossils and reconstructing a dig site. While they are still in the dirt, students will learn about the field of geology. The class will discover how geologists study rocks, dig up our own mineral samples, identify them, and learn about the geologic processes that formed them. Students will make their own crystal gardens to take home and observe.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Second quarter, we will learn some basics of physics and astronomy. Students will begin by exploring our solar system. They will learn about local planets and make their own glow-in-the-dark Saturn to take home. The class will discuss the newest discoveries such as a possible hydrothermal vents on Jupiter' s moons, a possible Planet X, and water ice on Mars. Then, the class will look at the some of the physics and engineering that are making these discoveries possible. Discover the physics behind the telescopes and other instruments that help us learn about outer space, and the principles of space travel that help us explore. The physics of recent explorations such as the Perseverance Rover and Falcon Heavy Rocket will be discussed.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Find fascinating things in late fall! Hike through piles of fallen leaves. See farther through the bare branches. Look for evidence of animals getting ready for winter and birds migrating to warmer locales. Discover changes in plant life, observe stream ecology, and watch for changes in the weather!

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Find fascinating things in late fall! Hike through piles of fallen leaves. See farther through the bare branches. Look for evidence of animals getting ready for winter and birds migrating to warmer locales. Discover changes in plant life, observe stream ecology, and watch for changes in the weather!

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Experience the thrill of spring- nature's fastest paced season! Watch as the forest transforms each week with new leaves, flowers, nests, and the full stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, enjoying bird-song, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and the fresh spring air.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature.

(PK-K) Each week, ONE parent volunteer (with no baby/toddler in tow) will be asked to accompany the group into the woods to be the extra set of hands and eyes! Otherwise, the group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 4, minimum, by the state of class and must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and following instructions.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Experience the thrill of spring- nature's fastest paced season! Watch as the forest transforms each week with new leaves, flowers, nests, and the full stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, enjoying bird-song, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and the fresh spring air.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature.

(PK-K) Each week, ONE parent volunteer (with no baby/toddler in tow) will be asked to accompany the group into the woods to be the extra set of hands and eyes! Otherwise, the group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 4, minimum, by the state of class and must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and following instructions.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature.

(PK-K) Each week, ONE parent volunteer (with no baby/toddler in tow) will be asked to accompany the group into the woods to be the extra set of hands and eyes! Otherwise, the group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 4, minimum, by the state of class and must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and following instructions.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature.

(PK-K) Each week, ONE parent volunteer (with no baby/toddler in tow) will be asked to accompany the group into the woods to be the extra set of hands and eyes! Otherwise, the group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 4, minimum, by the state of class and must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and following instructions.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will work together to develop an original play featuring polar pals enjoying frigid fun. What will happen when penguins and polar bears meet seals and snowy owls in icy incidents and snowy scenes?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fables (Quarter 1); Magical Monsters (Quarter 2); Arctic Adventure (Quarter 3); and Under the Sea Secrets (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will work together to retell famous fables in an original play full of colorful characters. Will crafty creatures meet hilarious humans and other crazy cast members in silly scenes and storylines to teach a life lesson or tall tale?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fables (Quarter 1); Magical Monsters (Quarter 2); Arctic Adventure (Quarter 3); and Under the Sea Secrets (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will create an imaginative storyline and unique characters for their very own original play. Will they meet daring dragons, jolly giants, wacky witches, and other mythical monsters in their supernatural spectacle?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fables (Quarter 1); Magical Monsters (Quarter 2); Arctic Adventure (Quarter 3); and Under the Sea Secrets (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Acting is an adventure! Young actors will create an imaginative storyline and unique characters for their very own original performance. What will happen if whales and walruses meet flashy fish and mystical mermaids in a unique underwater undertaking?

Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.

Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.

Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.

Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fables (Quarter 1); Magical Monsters (Quarter 2); Arctic Adventure (Quarter 3); and Under the Sea Secrets (Quarter 4).

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Students will learn the basic history of the Civil War, with a focus on the bloodiest battle ever fought on American soil, the three days at Gettysburg. Gettysburg would be the last major offensive action by the Confederate Army on Union soil, shattering the myth of Lee's invincibility on the field and signaling the beginning of the Confederacy's downfall.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Revolutionary War- Lexington & Concord (Quarter 1); The Alamo & the Mexican-American War (Quarter 2); The Civil War, Battle of Gettysburg (Quarter 3); and The Spanish-American War, Invasion of San Juan Hill, Cuba (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Remember the Alamo! No? We'll fix that. The US did not always extend from sea to shining sea, and it would take several conflicts with Mexico to make that so. First was the Texas Revolution, in which Texas sought its independence from Mexico. It was this conflict that gave us the Alamo, often portrayed as a heroic last stand in the face of overwhelming odds. (That was only partially true.) Next was the Mexican-American War, in which the United States gained not only Texas, but also the California territory which included all the land from Texas to the Pacific. This class will focus heavily on US westward expansion and how the conquest of California and Texas added fuel to the eventual fire of the American Civil War.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Revolutionary War- Lexington & Concord (Quarter 1); The Alamo & the Mexican-American War (Quarter 2); The Civil War, Battle of Gettysburg (Quarter 3); and The Spanish-American War, Invasion of San Juan Hill, Cuba (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Discover the first battles of the American War of Independence, Lexington and Concord, from the "shots heard round the world" to the unlikely match-up of an untrained militia of colonial farmers against the professional soldiers and statesmen of the great British Empire's army.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Revolutionary War- Lexington & Concord (Quarter 1); The Alamo & the Mexican-American War (Quarter 2); The Civil War, Battle of Gettysburg (Quarter 3); and The Spanish-American War, Invasion of San Juan Hill, Cuba (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

In the late 19th century, the US had expanded rapidly across North America, leaving nowhere to go but overseas. To this end, we began to build a powerful, modern navy of steel warships, like the USS Maine. These ships sailed the world, "showing the flag" and letting our allies and enemies alike know that the US was an industrial force to be reckoned with. This went well until February 1898, when the USS Maine unexpectedly blew up in Havana harbor, where she'd been "showing the flag" in case the Cuban revolts against the Spanish there threatened American financial interests. Never one to miss an opportunity to sell newspapers, William Randolph Hearst (among others) reported that the ship had been sunk by a Spanish mine. This was not true, but that did not matter to "yellow journalists" who were the "fake news" or tabloids of that time. The story sold well and whipped the American people into a war frenzy. "Remember the Maine!" became the battle cry of the coming Spanish-American war. This class will cover the beginning of America's overseas empire, pre-World War 1 American politics of the Gilded age, and the beginning of the age of modern war.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Revolutionary War- Lexington & Concord (Quarter 1); The Alamo & the Mexican-American War (Quarter 2); The Civil War, Battle of Gettysburg (Quarter 3); and The Spanish-American War, Invasion of San Juan Hill, Cuba (Quarter 4)

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. Third quarter, they will fabricate a fantasy adventure. Will their story feature fantastical creatures, faraway places, or fictional events?

Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with Acting: Kids Theater or Writing Well: Sentences that Speak to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: A Secret Room (Quarter 1); A Hero's Journey (Quarter 2); A Fantasy Adventure (Quarter 3); and A Walk in the Woods (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. Second quarter, they will chronicle the account of a hero's journey. Will their story include an original superhero, an ordinary kid, or an old-timey tale? Where are they going, and what must they accomplish?

Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with Acting: Kids Theater or Writing Well: Sentences that Speak to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: A Secret Room (Quarter 1); A Hero's Journey (Quarter 2); A Fantasy Adventure (Quarter 3); and A Walk in the Woods (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. First quarter, they will spin the story of a secret room- Where is the secluded room, and what is its secret?

Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with Acting: Kids Theater or Writing Well: Sentences that Speak to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: A Secret Room (Quarter 1); A Hero's Journey (Quarter 2); A Fantasy Adventure (Quarter 3); and A Walk in the Woods (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. Fourth quarter, they will draft the drama of a walk in the woods. Who do they wake? Where do they wander?

Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"

Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with Acting: Kids Theater or Writing Well: Sentences that Speak to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: A Secret Room (Quarter 1); A Hero's Journey (Quarter 2); A Fantasy Adventure (Quarter 3); and A Walk in the Woods (Quarter 4).

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

3000 years ago, western civilization, as the ancients knew it, almost disappeared. This was known as the Bronze Age Collapse, a near total ending of all civilization in the Mediterranean world. Only the mightiest empires would be able to withstand the onslaught of displaced invaders, climate disasters, and the breakdown of trade that had fueled the Bronze age. The last bastion of early human civilization was the New Kingdom of Egypt. Protected from land invasion by an impassable desert, their greatest threat would arrive by sea, giving the invaders the name, "the Sea Peoples." Because of the breakdown in civilization, little is known about Sea Peoples, but they forced the Empire of Ramses to change completely, or face extinction!

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger terrain and then compete in a history-based role-playing game which will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, and/or warfare of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include:

Ancient Egypt & the Sea Peoples (Quarter 1); Ancient Greece & the Trojan War (Quarter 2); The Roman Republic (Quarter 3); and Viking Invasions (Quarter 4)

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Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

In the "dark ages" of Europe, the Germanic barbarians and former invaders who settled in Western Europe had their turn at being menaced by ferocious pagans from the far corners of the world- the Vikings! Anglo Saxon Britain and Francia (i.e. proto-France) were some of the first victims of the marauding Viking raids, but over three centuries, Viking pillaging and piracy would reach from the North African coast and Sicily, all the way to the Middle East! The reputation for plunder and violence was earned, but not the entire story. Archaeological evidence shows that the "Vikings" actually spent more time exploring and trading, bringing goods from as far away as China to burial mounds in Northern Europe. This class will discuss the perfect storm of conditions that made Viking life possible, and recreate their home port coastal villages.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger terrain and then compete in a history-based role-playing game which will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, and/or warfare of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include:

Ancient Egypt & the Sea Peoples (Quarter 1); Ancient Greece & the Trojan War (Quarter 2); The Roman Republic (Quarter 3); and Viking Invasions (Quarter 4)

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Have you wondered about re-usable, high altitude space planes? In this simulation class, students will examine aspects of Aeronautical Engineering to design, build, and launch their own virtual high altitude space planes. On screen, student engineers will select and test variables such as wing shape, fuselage design, and engine type, while also experimenting with lift, drag, and thrust-to-weight.

The class will use KerbalEDU simulation software on laptops to immerse themselves in a realistic, simulated environment to complete a series of challenging missions. In the KerbalEDU environment, students can design and build different marine vessels, launch them, and use mission data to improve their designs.

Topics in this Series: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes (Quarter 1); Aerospace Engineering- Space Missions (Quarter 2); Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design (Quarter 3); Marine Engineering- Ships & Submarines (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Are you interested in rocket design and engines? In this simulation class, students will examine aspects of Aerospace Engineering to design, build, and launch their own virtual multi-stage rockets. On screen, student engineers will apply the physics of space flight and test variables such as nose cone shape, fins, stages, and fuels.

The class will use KerbalEDU simulation software on laptops to immerse themselves in a realistic, simulated environment to complete a series of challenging missions. In the KerbalEDU environment, students can design and build different marine vessels, launch them, and use mission data to improve their designs.

Topics in this Series: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes (Quarter 1); Aerospace Engineering- Space Missions (Quarter 2); Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design (Quarter 3); Marine Engineering- Ships & Submarines (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Would you live in a long-term space habitat? In this simulation class, students will examine aspects of Astronautical Engineering to design, build, launch, and resupply their own space station modules in a multi-player environment. On screen, student engineers will construct modules for command, housing, research, storage and support for a virtual for a space stations, such as the ISS, while considering the challenges of long-term space habitation.

The class will use KerbalEDU simulation software on laptops to immerse themselves in a realistic, simulated environment to complete a series of challenging missions. In the KerbalEDU environment, students can design and build different marine vessels, launch them, and use mission data to improve their designs.

Topics in this Series: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes (Quarter 1); Aerospace Engineering- Space Missions (Quarter 2); Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design (Quarter 3); Marine Engineering- Ships & Submarines (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Are you intrigued by the voyage, exploration, and defense of the seas? In this simulation class, students will examine aspects of Marine Engineering to design, build, launch, and pilot their own virtual navy. On screen, student engineers will select and test variables such as hull shape and material, type of propulsion, fuel source, vessel weight, and more to create a variety ships and submarines. They will use their virtual vessels to complete missions, onscreen challenges, and epic sea battles.

The class will use KerbalEDU simulation software on laptops to immerse themselves in a realistic, simulated environment to complete a series of challenging missions. In the KerbalEDU environment, students can design and build different marine vessels, launch them, and use mission data to improve their designs.

Topics in this Series: Aeronautical Engineering- High Altitude Space Planes (Quarter 1); Aerospace Engineering- Space Missions (Quarter 2); Astronautical Engineering- Space Station Design (Quarter 3); Marine Engineering- Ships & Submarines (Quarter 4).

1
Edwige Pinover
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Edwige Pinover
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Edwige Pinover
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Edwige Pinover
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes.
Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Find out what different scientists do! This class allows young scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Fourth quarter, students will learn some basics biology, using their powers of observation and digital microscopes to investigate plants and animals from the grounds. The class will discuss how these organisms survive and adapt. As entomologists, they will take an up-close look at insects and discover the many important ecological functions that they perform, from nutrient cycling to pollination. Guest insects will include pillbugs, millipedes, Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and an ant farm. To emphasize the topic of nutrient cycling, students will also make their own worm farms to take home to observe and apply the basics of composting household waste.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Find out what different scientists do! This class allows young scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Third quarter, we will learn some basics of chemistry and medical science. Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change. They will intersperse their chemistry experiments with studies of medical science. The class will review the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy. The group will discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick. Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we're able to grow. After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we'll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs!

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Find out what different scientists do! This class allows young scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

First quarter, we will learn some basics of paleontology and geology. Students will learn about the science and methods of paleontology as they prepare for a mock fossil dig. They will handle real fossils, learn how fossilization occurs, and simulate excavating fossils and reconstructing a dig site. While they are still in the dirt, students will learn about the field of geology. The class will discover how geologists study rocks, dig up our own mineral samples, identify them, and learn about the geologic processes that formed them. Students will make their own crystal gardens to take home and observe.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Find out what different scientists do! This class allows young scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Second quarter, we will learn some basics of physics and astronomy. Students will begin by exploring our solar system. They will learn about local planets and make their own glow-in-the-dark Saturn to take home. The class will discuss the newest discoveries such as a possible hydrothermal vents on Jupiter' s moons, a possible Planet X, and water ice on Mars. Then, the class will look at the some of the physics and engineering that are making these discoveries possible. Discover the physics behind the telescopes and other instruments that help us learn about outer space, and the principles of space travel that help us explore. The physics of recent explorations such as the Perseverance Rover and Falcon Heavy Rocket will be discussed.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Find fascinating things in late fall! Hike through piles of fallen leaves. See farther through the bare branches. Look for evidence of animals getting ready for winter and birds migrating to warmer locales. Discover changes in plant life, observe stream ecology, and watch for changes in the weather!

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Find fascinating things in late fall! Hike through piles of fallen leaves. See farther through the bare branches. Look for evidence of animals getting ready for winter and birds migrating to warmer locales. Discover changes in plant life, observe stream ecology, and watch for changes in the weather!

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Experience the thrill of spring- nature's fastest paced season! Watch as the forest transforms each week with new leaves, flowers, nests, and the full stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, enjoying bird-song, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and the fresh spring air.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Experience the thrill of spring- nature's fastest paced season! Watch as the forest transforms each week with new leaves, flowers, nests, and the full stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, enjoying bird-song, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and the fresh spring air.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1
Laura Adler
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Imagine a phone app that could quickly reunite lost pets, connect the poor with resources that they need, or report a problem in the community! Code for a Cause is the Compass-based Technovation hub where middle school girls will participate in the world's largest technology entrepreneurship program for girls. Each year, Technovation teams solve real world problems through technology that they develop!

Through Technovation, girls work with women mentors, identify a problem in their community, develop a mobile app, and launch a startup. Since 2010, 23,000 girls around the world have developed mobile apps and startups to solve problems around a diverse range of problems, including food waste, nutrition, women's safety, and much more. In this year-long program, girls will work in teams and learn the skills they need to change the world with technology.

Girls will begin with get-to-know-you and team building activities before breaking into teams of 3-4. Each team will brainstorm to identify a problem in the community. They will propose a mobile app solution to their problem and conduct market research to see if their idea is the best possible solution. Next, the girls will learn to program their unique application using a web-based software called Thunkable (an app inventor platform). In class, girls will be coached step-by-step on the process and logic of creating an interactive application. Finally, girls will learn how to brand their app, create a business plan, and look at what it would take to bring the app to market.

Participation in Technovation gives girls the confidence to pursue more computer science courses (70%), and give many the foundation to eventually major in computer science (26%). Technovation teams are in 100 countries, and the program is sponsored by Oracle, Google, 3M, Adobe Foundation, and others.

TechnologyEach student will need to have- and check- her own e-mail account and bring her own laptop to class each week. Chrome Books and tablets will not work for this application.Homework Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours outside of class each week on coding or collaborating with team members. Age: The Compass team will be competing at the middle school level. Team members must not turn 15 before August 2022 for this team.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Picture the mysterious count in a dark, dreary stone castle in Transylvania or the frail, young Lucy Seward ailing in an English sanitorium, afflicted by nightly, blood-sucking visits from a vampire. How would you portray these scenes on stage?

Have you ever wondered what happens behind the scenes to bring a production to stage? It takes a team of people to put on a show: stage managers, specialized designers for costumes, sets, props, lighting, music, and sound. There are also choreographers, fight directors, a dramaturge, a technical director, casting director, publicist, producer, and stage director to guide them all.

This class will explore the different roles of the production team, designers, and crew responsibilities as students analyze a script and make decisions as if they were the Director. Under the guidance of a theater professional, students will learn how the pre-production and design teams develop the director's vision to bring a production to life!

Students will begin with reading and analyzing a script without stage directions or notes. The group will make technical and artistic decisions to formulate a vision for the production. Students will learn to notate stage directions (such as 'stumble in from downstage right') and how to block scenes. They will make aesthetic decisions on set design and props, costuming, and technical effects such as lighting, sound effects, or music. The class will consider casting requirements and discuss the audition process. Example class projects include sketching costume concepts, creating a miniature set, and preparing audition notices.

This class is recommended for beginners as well as experienced theatre and production students. Every script is different and offers new sets of challenges. The emphasis in this course is on the vision, design decisions, and the teamwork required to bring a performance to stage, but the class will not be putting on an actual production. Students who want to further their study of theatrical production might wish to co-register for the 2021-22 courses on costume fabrication, Sewing for Cosplay, Stage Combat, or one of several acting/improvisation classes.

Topics in this Series: Director's Chair: Murder on the Orient Express (Semester 1), Bram Stoker's Dracula (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be reviewed in class and summarized in the weekly e-mail. Assessments: Qualitative feedback will be given throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided. Textbook/Materials: Furnished by instructor. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script and project materials. What to Bring: Script and notes. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Imagine the dapper detective, Hercule Poirot resting aboard an elegant transcontinental train when the locomotive screeches to a stop in a snowdrift, and it is discovered that another passenger was murdered overnight. Picture a colorful cast of characters- a doctor, a governess, a matron and her maid, a businessman, a salesman, a valet, and others...all who have a motive in the murder. How would you tell this story on stage?

Have you ever wondered what happens behind the scenes to bring a production to stage? It takes a team of people to put on a show: stage managers, specialized designers for costumes, sets, props, lighting, music, and sound. There are also choreographers, fight directors, a dramaturge, a technical director, casting director, publicist, producer, and stage director to guide them all.

This class will explore the different roles of the production team, designers, and crew responsibilities as students analyze a script and make decisions as if they were the Director. Under the guidance of a theater professional, students will learn how the pre-production and design teams develop the director's vision to bring a production to life!

Students will begin with reading and analyzing a script without stage directions or notes. The group will make technical and artistic decisions to formulate a vision for the production. Students will learn to notate stage directions (such as 'stumble in from downstage right') and how to block scenes. They will make aesthetic decisions on set design and props, costuming, and technical effects such as lighting, sound effects, or music. The class will consider casting requirements and discuss the audition process. Example class projects include sketching costume concepts, creating a miniature set, and preparing audition notices.

This class is recommended for beginners as well as experienced theatre and production students. Every script is different and offers new sets of challenges. The emphasis in this course is on the vision, design decisions, and the teamwork required to bring a performance to stage, but the class will not be putting on an actual production. Students who want to further their study of theatrical production might wish to co-register for the 2021-22 courses on costume fabrication, Sewing for Cosplay, Stage Combat, or one of several acting/improvisation classes.

Topics in this Series: Director's Chair: Murder on the Orient Express (Semester 1), Bram Stoker's Dracula (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Will be reviewed in class and summarized in the weekly e-mail. Assessments: Qualitative feedback will be given throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided. Textbook/Materials: Furnished by instructor. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script and project materials. What to Bring: Script and notes. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Discover the ancient tale of the fierce, warrior prince of the Viking age- Beowulf. The well-loved saga tells of Beowulf and his followers, the most elite monster hunters ever. From diving into the depths of the ocean to slay sea monsters, to battling the brutal behemoth, Grendel, in Danish King Hrothgar's great hall, discover how Beowulf earned his fame. The story of Beowulf is a dungeon-crawling Viking epic for the ages and serves as the roots for the modern fantasy genre. It has been called the Norse Odyssey, complete with monsters and dragons.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger terrain and then compete in a history-based role-playing game which will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, and/or warfare of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include:

The Pyramids & Gods of Ancient Egypt (Quarter 1); The Odyssey- Ancient Greece (Quarter 2); The Aeneid- Roman Republic (Quarter 3); and Beowulf- The Vikings (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

The Aeneid is the story of the mythical founding of Rome, as told by Rome's greatest epic poet, Virgil. Often compared to the Odyssey, another epic story of a journey, but with a dash of Roman propaganda thrown in. This is the tale of Aneas, a Trojan refugee who exemplifies all the great Roman virtues, such as piety, prudence, and gravitas. Each story in the epic exemplifies a different virtue and seeks to connect the founding of Rome and the family of Julius Caesar to mythical heroes and the gods themselves! The class will recreate these scenes in miniature for a role playing game, testing our knowledge of Roman culture, virtue, and favor of the goddess Fortuna!

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger terrain and then compete in a history-based role-playing game which will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, and/or warfare of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include:

The Pyramids & Gods of Ancient Egypt (Quarter 1); The Odyssey- Ancient Greece (Quarter 2); The Aeneid- Ancient Rome (Quarter 3); and Beowulf- The Vikings (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

After the events of the Trojan War described in the Illiad, came The Odyssey, the arduous ten-year journey home to Ithaca by the legendary hero Odysseus. In true epic fashion, this is a story replete with meddling and vengeful gods, fierce monsters, and diverse settings for its series of disasters. Students will recreate famous scenes, such as the slaying of the Cyclops, or Odysseus's return to Ithaca to those who usurped his throne! These recreations will be used for role playing games, giving students a chance to be part of this unforgettable, ancient and epic!

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger terrain and then compete in a history-based role-playing game which will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, and/or warfare of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include:

The Pyramids & Gods of Ancient Egypt (Quarter 1); The Odyssey- Ancient Greece (Quarter 2); The Aeneid- The Roman Republic (Quarter 3); and Beowulf- The Vikings (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

The Old Kingdom, the first great civilization in Egypt, gave the world the iconic pyramids. Those pyramids, great and small, on the banks of the Nile River, and the nearby temples will serve as the backdrop for an exploration of the history and culture of Ancient Egypt, from the very beginning. Students will use their dioramas and a role playing game to tell the stories of Egypt's gods and foundational myths in the Old Kingdom.

Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger terrain and then compete in a history-based role-playing game which will reinforce lessons about the culture, economy, and/or warfare of the time. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $15.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include:

The Pyramids & Gods of Ancient Egypt (Quarter 1); The Odyssey- Ancient Greece (Quarter 2); The Aeneid- Roman Republic (Quarter 3); and Beowulf- The Vikings (Quarter 4)

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90-minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

Second quarter, junior engineers will tackle Awesome Automobiles, building pull-back motorcycles, belt-drive fire jeeps, gear-driven dragsters, and car carriers.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 2); Monster Machines (Quarter 3); Colossal Construction (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90-minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

Second quarter, junior engineers will tackle Awesome Automobiles, building pull-back motorcycles, belt-drive fire jeeps, gear-driven dragsters, and car carriers.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 2); Monster Machines (Quarter 3); Colossal Construction (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90-minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

Fourth quarter, students will build colossal vehicles like monster trucks and hulking construction vehicles and model enormous developments such as a massive waterfront development, a towering sky scraper, and a expansive space station.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 2); Monster Machines (Quarter 3); Colossal Construction (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90-minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

Fourth quarter, students will build colossal vehicles like monster trucks and hulking construction vehicles and model enormous developments such as a massive waterfront development, a towering sky scraper, and a expansive space station.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 2); Monster Machines (Quarter 3); Colossal Construction (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90-minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

Third quarter, junior engineers will tackle Monster Machines, building conveyor belts, elevators, catapults, tunnel-boring diggers, and a ferris wheel.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 2); Monster Machines (Quarter 3); Colossal Construction (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90-minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

Third quarter, junior engineers will tackle Monster Machines, building conveyor belts, elevators, catapults, tunnel-boring diggers, and a ferris wheel.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 2); Monster Machines (Quarter 3); Colossal Construction (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90-minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Super Structures, using the Pyramids of Giza, the Great Wall of China, the Seattle Space Needed, Eiffel Tower, and the world's biggest bridges for their inspiration.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 2); Monster Machines (Quarter 3); Colossal Construction (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90-minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.

First quarter, junior engineers will tackle Super Structures, using the Pyramids of Giza, the Great Wall of China, the Seattle Space Needed, Eiffel Tower, and the world's biggest bridges for their inspiration.

Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown. Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. Topics in this Series: Super Structures (Quarter 1); Awesome Automobiles (Quarter 2); Monster Machines (Quarter 3); Colossal Construction (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Each week, students will tackle math puzzles, challenges, and learn new "tricks" and techniques to solve a variety of math problems, all while learning about the masterminds behind founding principles of modern mathematics. Students will learn about the life and times of a great mathematician and then explore key concepts, principles, and formulas introduced by the featured master. Students' problem- solving skills will be honed as they examine the historical, cultural, and personal context for discoveries in mathematics. The class will work sample problems and use experiments and manipulatives to demonstrate the formulas, theories, short-cuts, or alternate approaches suggested by famous mathematicians.

First quarter, students will be exposed to a wide variety of math terms and concepts from the great "Geometers" including Euclid, Pythagoras, Heron, and Descartes.

Topics in this Series: Geometry Challenges (Quarter 1); Pattens & Problems Solvers (Quarter 2); Great Discoveries (Quarter 3); and Modern Challenges (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Each week, students will tackle math puzzles, challenges, and learn new "tricks" and techniques to solve a variety of math problems, all while learning about the masterminds behind founding principles of modern mathematics. Students will learn about the life and times of a great mathematician and then explore key concepts, principles, and formulas introduced by the featured master. Students' problem- solving skills will be honed as they examine the historical, cultural, and personal context for discoveries in mathematics. The class will work sample problems and use experiments and manipulatives to demonstrate the formulas, theories, short-cuts, or alternate approaches suggested by famous mathematicians.

, Third quarter, students will be exposed to a wide variety of mathematical terms and concepts from the ancient scientists Archimedes, Newton, Keplar, and Galileo.

Topics in this Series: Geometry Challenges (Quarter 1); Pattens & Problems Solvers (Quarter 2); Great Discoveries (Quarter 3); and Modern Challenges (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Each week, students will tackle math puzzles, challenges, and learn new "tricks" and techniques to solve a variety of math problems, all while learning about the masterminds behind founding principles of modern mathematics. Students will learn about the life and times of a great mathematician and then explore key concepts, principles, and formulas introduced by the featured master. Students' problem- solving skills will be honed as they examine the historical, cultural, and personal context for discoveries in mathematics. The class will work sample problems and use experiments and manipulatives to demonstrate the formulas, theories, short-cuts, or alternate approaches suggested by famous mathematicians.

Fourth quarter, students will be exposed to a wide variety of mathematical terms and concepts from the Modern Thinkers including Fermat, Euler, Galois, and Noether.

Topics in this Series: Geometry Challenges (Quarter 1); Pattens & Problems Solvers (Quarter 2); Great Discoveries (Quarter 3); and Modern Challenges (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Each week, students will tackle math puzzles, challenges, and learn new "tricks" and techniques to solve a variety of math problems, all while learning about the masterminds behind founding principles of modern mathematics. Students will learn about the life and times of a great mathematician and then explore key concepts, principles, and formulas introduced by the featured master. Students' problem- solving skills will be honed as they examine the historical, cultural, and personal context for discoveries in mathematics. The class will work sample problems and use experiments and manipulatives to demonstrate the formulas, theories, short-cuts, or alternate approaches suggested by famous mathematicians.

Second quarter, students will be exposed to a wide variety of math terms, concepts, and patterns from the great problem solvers including Eratosthenes, Napier, Polya, and Babbage.

Topics in this Series: Geometry Challenges (Quarter 1); Pattens & Problems Solvers (Quarter 2); Great Discoveries (Quarter 3); and Modern Challenges (Quarter 4).

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Ready for a laugh? Kick off the year with a comedy mash-up of humorous misunderstandings and hilarious mix-ups presented as a variety show of short, comedic sketches. Discover if you are you more witty or wisecracking, side-splitting or slapstick.

Tweens will enjoy experimenting with the elements of comedy- irony, exaggeration, parody, surprise, satire, and exploiting the unexpected. Each class will begin with acting warm-ups and improv exercises. The group will begin with prepared scripts for several skits that they can work together to customize and individualize. In a collaborative process, the class will develop a series of short scene, or vignettes. Student who get the writing bug can try their hand at crafting a script for their classmates. Everyone will have the opportunity to improve their public speaking and stage presence skills while have a blast.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter.

Topics in this Series: Comedy Mash-Up (Quarter 1); Quick Scripts (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Who Dunnit? (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again, as they offer a new and different experience every time!

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Students will learn how to develop a scene with a partner with no script, no planning, and no casting! Tweens will learn how to react, interact, and respond "on the fly" and in character to each other in situations that are made-up on-the-spot. Actors will practice taking cues from their partners to keep the scene going in a hilarious, creative development that no one can anticipate or replicate.

Popular improvisational exercises such as "Scene Jump", "Columns," and "Two-Minute Story" will be the backdrop for unusual, unexpected, and mixed-up settings which will be the catalyst for wild and crazy interactions among characters. Students' cooperative work will improve their creative thinking, interpersonal skills, and ability to think outside the box.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. Drawing on their favorite improv exercises, the students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter.

Topics in this Series: Comedy Mash-Up (Quarter 1); Quick Scripts (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Who Dunnit? (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time!

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Imagine a scene at a crazy concert, an awkward birthday party, the worst movie ever, a misunderstanding in a foreign country, or a close encounter with a celebrity!

Envision those scenarios all in one zany production, as a collection of one-minute plays! The class will race through at least twenty short scripts featuring a range of whacky mini stories. The class will cast, practice, and perform them in a rapid-fire form called tiny theater and flash fiction. One-minute plays are popular around the country in venues such as college theater, indie stage, and countless festivals such as the annual "Gone in 60 Seconds" event.

New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with the rapid-fire pace of these super-short plays as they connect with the audience, bring their character to life, and tell their story... in just one minute. Students will change characters and plots in quick succession and bring the audience along with them. If they forget a line, they'll improvise! From story to story, students will develop clever transitions and sequence the short scenes to a coherent class production.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter.

Topics in this Series: Comedy Mash-Up (Quarter 1); Quick Scripts (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Who Dunnit? (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again, as they offer a new and different experience every time!

1
Judith Harmon
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Students will create a unique, improvisational "Who Dunnit" mystery. As a group, the tweens will select a unique theme and an intriguing location for their own, original mystery. Will it be a crowded bus, a sports game, a luxury hotel, a space ship, or something else? Over the course of the workshop, students will develop their own characters including suspects and investigators- all who have a motive- and a victim. The cast will guide the audience along the path of mystery and suspense.

The final class will showcase their process and performance, where students will enjoy the artistry of putting it all together in a group setting. Clues and motives revealed by the on-stage investigation will confound the audience as they try to identify the guilty culprit. The question, "Who dunnit?" remains unknown until the final performance, where no one knows until the final reveal.

This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter.

Topics in this Series: Comedy Mash-Up (Quarter 1); Quick Scripts (Quarter 2); Improv Scenes (Quarter 3); and Who Dunnit? (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time!

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Fourth quarter, students will learn some basics biology, using their powers of observation and digital microscopes to investigate plants and animals from the grounds. The class will discuss how these organisms survive and adapt. As entomologists, they will take an up-close look at insects and discover the many important ecological functions that they perform, from nutrient cycling to pollination. Guest insects will include pillbugs, millipedes, Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and an ant farm. To emphasize the topic of nutrient cycling, students will also make their own worm farms to take home to observe and apply the basics of composting household waste.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Third quarter, we will learn some basics of chemistry and medical science. Students will learn about pH, make their own acid-base indicator solution, make thermochromic (color-changing) putty and learn the physics behind its color-change. They will intersperse their chemistry experiments with studies of medical science. The class will review the basics of how human bodies work and how to keep ourselves healthy. The group will discuss our circulatory, respiratory and immune systems and learn how germs make us sick. Students will take samples from our classroom and other locations and culture them to see what bacteria we're able to grow. After that (sometimes alarming) experiment, we'll learn proper hand-washing techniques and test our effectiveness with the same UV glow lotion hospitals use in their infection control programs. Look out germs!

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

First quarter, we will learn some basics of paleontology and geology. Students will learn about the science and methods of paleontology as they prepare for a mock fossil dig. They will handle real fossils, learn how fossilization occurs, and simulate excavating fossils and reconstructing a dig site. While they are still in the dirt, students will learn about the field of geology. The class will discover how geologists study rocks, dig up our own mineral samples, identify them, and learn about the geologic processes that formed them. Students will make their own crystal gardens to take home and observe.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Dr. Karleen Boyle
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

There are so many ways to do science! This class allows our youngest scientists to explore different careers in the sciences and shows them that science is fun, approachable, and that anyone can do it! Students will use real scientific equipment and learn actual science terminology to investigate questions in different fields. Try out SCUBA gear as a marine biologist, learn the basics for studying DNA, perform experiments in chemistry, and try your hand at operating an ROV (remote operated vehicle). The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in at least three demonstrations or experiments during each class.

Second quarter, we will learn some basics of physics and astronomy. Students will begin by exploring our solar system. They will learn about local planets and make their own glow-in-the-dark Saturn to take home. The class will discuss the newest discoveries such as a possible hydrothermal vents on Jupiter' s moons, a possible Planet X, and water ice on Mars. Then, the class will look at the some of the physics and engineering that are making these discoveries possible. Discover the physics behind the telescopes and other instruments that help us learn about outer space, and the principles of space travel that help us explore. The physics of recent explorations such as the Perseverance Rover and Falcon Heavy Rocket will be discussed.

Topics in this Series: Chemist & Medical Scientist (Quarter 1); Physicist, Astronomer, & Engineer (Quarter 2)Paleontologist, Geologist & Field Biologist (Quarter 3), Entomologist, Marine Biologist (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Find fascinating things in late fall! Hike through piles of fallen leaves. See farther through the bare branches. Look for evidence of animals getting ready for winter and birds migrating to warmer locales. Discover changes in plant life, observe stream ecology, and watch for changes in the weather!

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Have fun the final weeks of summer! Look forward to early fall! Animals are active and sunning themselves. Plants are mature, and flowers have gone to seed. The stream may have slowed down from summer drought, but discoveries at the water's edge abound.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Experience the thrill of spring- nature's fastest paced season! Watch as the forest transforms each week with new leaves, flowers, nests, and the full stream bursting with life. It is the time for harvesting wild edibles, enjoying bird-song, and relishing the sights and smells of wildflowers and the fresh spring air.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1
Sevim Kalyoncu
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and witness the changes to the watershed.

Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!

A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.

Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Students will learn the basic history of the Civil War, with a focus on the bloodiest battle ever fought on American soil, the three days at Gettysburg. Gettysburg would be the last major offensive action by the Confederate Army on Union soil, shattering the myth of Lee's invincibility on the field and signaling the beginning of the Confederacy's downfall.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Revolutionary War- Lexington & Concord (Quarter 1); The Alamo & the Mexican-American War (Quarter 2); The Civil War, Battle of Gettysburg (Quarter 3); and The Spanish-American War, Invasion of San Juan Hill, Cuba (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Remember the Alamo! No? We'll fix that. The US did not always extend from sea to shining sea, and it would take several conflicts with Mexico to make that so. First was the Texas Revolution, in which Texas sought its independence from Mexico. It was this conflict that gave us the Alamo, often portrayed as a heroic last stand in the face of overwhelming odds. (That was only partially true.) Next was the Mexican-American War, in which the United States gained not only Texas, but also the California territory which included all the land from Texas to the Pacific. This class will focus heavily on US westward expansion and how the conquest of California and Texas added fuel to the eventual fire of the American Civil War.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Revolutionary War- Lexington & Concord (Quarter 1); The Alamo & the Mexican-American War (Quarter 2); The Civil War, Battle of Gettysburg (Quarter 3); and The Spanish-American War, Invasion of San Juan Hill, Cuba (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Discover the first battles of the American War of Independence, Lexington and Concord, from the "shots heard round the world" to the unlikely match-up of an untrained militia of colonial farmers against the professional soldiers and statesmen of the great British Empire's army.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Revolutionary War- Lexington & Concord (Quarter 1); The Alamo & the Mexican-American War (Quarter 2); The Civil War, Battle of Gettysburg (Quarter 3); and The Spanish-American War, Invasion of San Juan Hill, Cuba (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

In the late 19th century, the US had expanded rapidly across North America, leaving nowhere to go but overseas. To this end, we began to build a powerful, modern navy of steel warships, like the USS Maine. These ships sailed the world, "showing the flag" and letting our allies and enemies alike know that the US was an industrial force to be reckoned with. This went well until February 1898, when the USS Maine unexpectedly blew up in Havana harbor, where she'd been "showing the flag" in case the Cuban revolts against the Spanish there threatened American financial interests. Never one to miss an opportunity to sell newspapers, William Randolph Hearst (among others) reported that the ship had been sunk by a Spanish mine. This was not true, but that did not matter to "yellow journalists" who were the "fake news" or tabloids of that time. The story sold well and whipped the American people into a war frenzy. "Remember the Maine!" became the battle cry of the coming Spanish-American war. This class will cover the beginning of America's overseas empire, pre-World War 1 American politics of the Gilded age, and the beginning of the age of modern war.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Revolutionary War- Lexington & Concord (Quarter 1); The Alamo & the Mexican-American War (Quarter 2); The Civil War, Battle of Gettysburg (Quarter 3); and The Spanish-American War, Invasion of San Juan Hill, Cuba (Quarter 4)

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

2000 years ago, wanting to conquer the world did not make you a super villain, but rather a legend. At less than 30 years old, Alexander of Macedon inherited a kingdom and turned it into an empire that stretched to the corners of the known world! Discover the major battles of Alexander's campaigns, with a special focus on the Battle of Issus in 333 BCE that led to the collapse of the Persian Empire. Learn about reforms to the Macedonian army, the unification of Greece, as well as how Alexander's strategic genius allowed him to defeat an army five times larger than his own.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of this conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Alexander the Great (Quarter 1); Hannibal (Quarter 2); Julius Caesar in Britain (Quarter 3); and Attila the Hun (Quarter 4).

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Discover Attila the Hun's rampages through the declining 5th century Roman empire, particularly his conquests against the Eastern Roman Empire, where he captured hundreds of towns and cities and earned the nickname, "The Scourge of God." Attila led a horde of Nomads on horseback and introduced siege equipment, allowing them to do what even Hannibal could not do- take Roman cities!

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of this conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Alexander the Great (Quarter 1); Hannibal (Quarter 2); Julius Caesar in Britain (Quarter 3); and Attila the Hun (Quarter 4).

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

The budding empires of the Republic of Rome and Carthage emerged after the successors of Alexander the Great carved up the Mediterranean world. These two powers faced off in some of the largest wars the ancient world had seen, with massive fleets and vast armies positioned to destroy the other and establish dominance in the known world. History might take it for granted that Rome would prevail, but a cagey Carthaginian general and statesman, Hannibal, nearly changed that trajectory when he rampaged through Italy in the Second Punic War, a conquest best known for the invasion of Italy by crossing the Alps with his North African war elephants. Discover why Hannibal is widely considered one of the greatest military commanders in human history.

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of this conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Alexander the Great (Quarter 1); Hannibal (Quarter 2); Julius Caesar in Britain (Quarter 3); and Attila the Hun (Quarter 4).

1
Taliesin Knol
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

At the twilight of the Roman Republic, Gaius Julius Caesar learned he could gain the support of the mob of common Romans by bribing them with treasure plundered in conquest. Discover how Caesar would break The Republic and lay the foundation for an Empire. Fresh from his victories in Gaul and Germania, but still badly in need of money and glory, he set his sights on Britannia, to conquer what would become the last frontier of the Roman Empire. Caesar's veteran legions would battle hoards of barbarians, planting the roots of Roman civilization that linger today, and watering those roots with the blood of his enemies!

Students will engage in a hands-on 3D battle strategy game using the military dioramas that they make! Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, paint, and miniatures, each student will craft a 10 X 16 diorama. In class, they will view historical maps, artistic renderings, and/or photographs to understand the topography and development of this time and place in history. Students will customize their dioramas with landforms, landscape elements, waterways, and structures to represent a scene from this period. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with 1:72 scale miniature figures. Students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of this conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical war gaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.

Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this year's series include: Alexander the Great (Quarter 1); Hannibal (Quarter 2); Julius Caesar in Britain (Quarter 3); and Attila the Hun (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

First quarter, students will construct Animated Animals such as a hopping bunny, lumbering elephant, creeping frog, leaf-munching giraffe, trotting horse, mommy and baby bird, flapping owl, and a prowling, growling tiger.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules. In this longer format class, general science lessons on the topic will be presented alongside the robotics.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

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Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Fourth quarter, students will model and motorize creepy crawly creatures such as a crab, praying mantis, scorpion, snail, ant, spider, tadpole, and more.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules. In this longer format class, general science lessons on the topic will be presented alongside the robotics.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Sep 28 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Second quarter, modern robotics will bring extinct Jurassic world to life with projects such a Brachiosaur, T-Rex, Megalodon Shark, Pterodactyl and their current cousins- the Komodo Dragon and Crocodile.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules. In this longer format class, general science lessons on the topic will be presented alongside the robotics.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program a different whimsical, mechanized project each week using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.

Third quarter, rush hour comes to Compass as students build and program automated vehicles like a dune buggy, Formula 1 race car, tow truck, tractor trailer, bus, and more.

Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules. In this longer format class, general science lessons on the topic will be presented alongside the robotics.

Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished.

Topics in this Series: Animated Animals (Quarter 1), Jurassic Giants (Quarter 2); Rush Hour! (Quarter 3), and Creepy Crawlies (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic warrior which can battle other robots in the class on a tabletop arena. Each week, students will improve their robots though the addition of new sensors and components will program their creations to withstand different battle attacks.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

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Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Nov 16 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic vehicle to simulate a lunar lander which can traverse an uneven terrain and collect "moon rocks." Each week, students will improve their landers though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their creations to complete changing lunar challenges.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

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Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens May 18 6:00 am

Design, build, and program a robotic arm to simulate a factory assembly line. Each week, students will improve their robotic arms though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their devices to complete challenging manufacturing tasks.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

1
Becca Sticha
Reg. Opens Feb 1 6:00 am

Design, build, and program an explorer robot to navigate newly discovered, unmapped ancient tomb. Each week, students will improve their robots though the addition of new sensors and components and will program their devices to navigate a maze and collect treasure.

Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, and infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 coding menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.

This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing their projects. Topics in this Series: Robotic Arm (Quarter 1); Lunar Lander (Quarter 2); Battle Bots (Quarter 3); Tomb Explorer (Quarter 4).

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