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Registration for Winter classes (2nd semester and 3rd quarter) opens on Tuesday, November 15, at 6:00 am. A 10% early registration discount is offered through December 15.

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    Taliesin Knol
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    Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come to life for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!In 1942, American General Douglas MacArthur was forced to leave the Philippines in the face of the seemingly unstoppable Imperial Japanese juggernaut in the South Pacific. Just two years later, he made good on his promise to return. However, this time he had the most powerful armada the world has ever seen at his back, the culmination of years of work of The Arsenal of Democracy. More than 600 cutting-edge ships, dwarfing almost every other navy combined, carried a million soldiers and marines from the Allied Forces. Faced with overwhelming material and manpower superiority, the Japanese leveraged what remained of their skill and determination to fight to the last ship, the last bullet, the last blade, and the last man, to stop the Americans and end the war as quickly as possible.Students will fight the last battles of the Pacific theater on land, sea, and air using a wide range of miniature soldiers, aircraft, vehicles, and ships. From massive naval action around the Philippines and Okinawa to the shores of Iwo Jima, students will simulate a variety of jungle and island-hopping combat engagements using a modified version of the Axis and Allies war at sea system. Students will study the technical and strategic elements that led to the outcomes of the battle and attempt to recreate the Japanese or Allied successes (or failures). At the end of each semester, every student will understand the conditions that led to war, the objectives for both sides, and how successful or realistic these objectives were, both from a modern academic point of view and from the historical point of view given each country's available information. This will be accomplished with primary sources, newsreels from the time, propaganda material, and modern analysis. The instructor will provide online access to all of this material via Google Drive and a class YouTube Playlist.Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through. This is a 15-week class that will not meet on February 10.Topics in this Series: WWII- The Invasion of Fortress Europe 1943-45 (Semester 1) and WWII- Operation Downfall 1944-45 (Semester 2).Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come to life for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top terrain, deploy hundreds of miniature soldiers, ships, and tanks... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!In 1942, American General Douglas MacArthur was forced to leave the Philippines in the face of the seemingly unstoppable Imperial Japanese juggernaut in the South Pacific. Just two years later, he made good on his promise to return. However, this time he had the most powerful armada the world has ever seen at his back, the culmination of years of work of The Arsenal of Democracy. More than 600 cutting-edge ships, dwarfing almost every other navy combined, carried a million soldiers and marines from the Allied Forces. Faced with overwhelming material and manpower superiority, the Japanese leveraged what remained of their skill and determination to fight to the last ship, the last bullet, the last blade, and the last man, to stop the Americans and end the war as quickly as possible.Students will fight the last battles of the Pacific theater on land, sea, and air using a wide range of miniature soldiers, aircraft, vehicles, and ships. From massive naval action around the Philippines and Okinawa to the shores of Iwo Jima, students will simulate a variety of jungle and island-hopping combat engagements using a modified version of the Axis and Allies war at sea system. Students will study the technical and strategic elements that led to the outcomes of the battle and attempt to recreate the Japanese or Allied successes (or failures). At the end of each semester, every student will understand the conditions that led to war, the objectives for both sides, and how successful or realistic these objectives were, both from a modern academic point of view and from the historical point of view given each country's available information. This will be accomplished with primary sources, newsreels from the time, propaganda material, and modern analysis. The instructor will provide online access to all of this material via Google Drive and a class YouTube Playlist.Note: This is a 1 hour, 55 minute class with a 10-minute break part way through.Topics in this Series: WWII- The Invasion of Fortress Europe 1943-45 (Semester 1) and WWII- Operation Downfall 1944-45 (Semester 2).Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sarah Fraser
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    Recently, in response to the pandemic, the majority of colleges have been "test optional" for applying students. However, more and more of those now say, "except for homeschoolers" and still expect achievement test scores in order to have a standardized benchmark for those who learn at home.Whether college admissions tests (SAT, PSAT, or ACT) are right around the corner or down the road, this class will teach you how to tackle the tests, decode the questions, and boost your scores. While SAT/ACT test scores are not automatic ticket into the college of your choice, higher scores will get your application in the to-be-considered pile where admissions staff will take a closer look at all the other amazing things you have done.This class will help you feel prepared to face standardized admissions tests and take away some of the worry and mystery that surround these assessments. Each week, students will spend time on strategies for math and English portions of the tests. Students will learn about test designs and the types and difficulty levels of reading, grammar, and math questions. The class will learn how to approach multiple choice questions, how to read passages for comprehension, and what to do when you don t know an answer. This class is not a crash course that preps you for one test sitting, but rather teaches you lasting techniques to get you ready for whenever you decide to take a standardized test. The instructor will lay out a study plan for test-ready students and be able to offer tips on many aspects of the college admissions process. When the class wraps up, students and parents will understand the process of SAT and ACT testing and feel prepared for the personal challenge of the test experience.Topics in this Series: Success Skills for School: High School and Beyond (Semester 1).Prerequisites: For this class, students should be reading and have comprehension at or above grade level and have completed Algebra I. While geometry is included on the tests, completion of geometry is not assumed. Geometry formulas are provided within the tests, and the instructor will teach how to find and apply those formulas.Workload: Students should expect to spend one hour per week on homework for this class. Assignments: Prior to the start of class, each student should have taken a scored, practice SAT or ACT exam (found on the College Board or ACT website). All other assignments will be made in class and e-mailed to parents/students. Assessments: Students will take a variety of in-class and at-home time, practice test sections. The instructor will not provide additional assessments beyond the practice tests. Textbook: Students should purchase either The Official SAT Study Guide, 2020 Edition, published by the College Board (2018 ISBN # 978-1457312199) or the The Official ACT Prep Guide, 2022-23 Edition (2018-19 ISBN #978-1119865902).What to Bring: Students should bring their test book, notebook/paper, and a TI-83 or equivalent calculator to class to practice math questions that permit the use of a calculator. Phone calculators cannot be used.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) elective credit purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Pete Van Riper
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    Students will be introduced to painting with acrylics in a relaxed, informal studio setting under the guidance of a professional art instructor. Students will work on canvas boards and will learn elements of art, principles of design, and color theory in addition to methods in painting. Each week, the instructor will demonstrate a different technique in acrylic painting rather than a different subject. Techniques will include mixing and blending paints, wet and dry brush techniques, sponge techniques, glazing, washing, gradient relief, sgraffito, impasto, smudging, dot techniques, stippling, pouring, splattering, dabbing, underpainting, and detailing. The emphasis will be on methods and effects so that each student has a “toolbox” of techniques for working in acrylics. Students will have the freedom to mix and match the techniques that they have learned to create original pieces. In the open studio concepts, each student will have a different goal and unique project in-progress such as still life, floral, landscape, portrait, fantasy, abstract, or pop art. Student will complete two or three boards each quarter, depending on the level of detailing.This class is suitable for beginners who have never painted before, and for experienced art students who have worked in other mediums and are interested in exploring acrylic painting. Compass parents are welcome to register for this class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class. Painting can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Work outside of class is optional, however students who want to continue to practice their painting techniques might want to purchase a tabletop easel (approx. $10.00) and set of basic acrylic paints ($30.00+) for home use.Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: A supply fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for canvas boards and shared class supplies (paints, brushes, paper products, etc.).What to Wear: Students may wish to wear an apron, smock, or paint shirt when working with acrylic paints.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    It's not always what it seems! Sometimes, a thrilling performance seems to lead the audience in one direction only to make a theatrical turn-around to reveal a different tale. Teens will enjoy the creativity and camaraderie of selecting, casting, rehearsing, and performing a short play that presents a comical about-face. The class will begin by reading through two* possible scripts to select one that bests suits their group and grabs their interest from among:

    • 39 Steps: A Live Radio Play (inspired by Hitchcock's classic tale)
    • Superheroes: With Great Power Comes Ordinary Responsibility (fast-paced vignettes on the ordinary lives of superheroes)
    Students, along with their acting coach, will cast, rehearse, and coordinate a class performance. Teens will enjoy taking on unusual personas and bringing their characters to life while interacting with classmates. They will be encouraged to design and assemble simple costumes, props, and backdrops from items at home. They will be expected to learn their lines and fully participate in planning their performance. The group will perform the 45-60 minute piece for family and friends at the end of the semester.Classes in acting and theater education build a teen's confidence along with improving their social and communication skills. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class.(*An additional script might be introduced based on final cast size.) Topics in this Series: Theater Abridged (Semester 1), It's Not What it Seems (Semester 2). Continuing students from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: If any, will be posted in a Google Classroom.Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script, performance royalty, and project materials.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Ahoy matey! There comes a time when a pirate may need to walk the plank or walk away. When a pirate prefers pilates to pillaging and pedicures to plundering, it's time to take action. The crew on the high seas recognize that their pirate colleague has gone soft (or worst yet, become a landlubber), they must act by helping him see the "13 Signs You Should Stop Being a Pirate." Arrgghh! Tweens will appreciate the quirky, off-beat humor of this scripted comedy. They will enjoy the creativity and camaraderie of working together to bring this humorous piece to stage.Students, along with their acting instructor, will cast, rehearse, and coordinate a class performance of this comedy. Students will be encouraged to design and assemble simple costumes, props, and backdrops from items at home. Student actors will be expected to learn their lines and participate fully. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the semester. Topics in this Series: All I Really Needed to Know I Learned from Being A Zombie (Semester 1) and 13 Signs You Should Stop Being a Pirate (Semester 2). Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script, performance royalty, and project materials.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Acting is an adventure! Young actors work together to create and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. What happens when an energetic elephant, zany zebra, and hysterical hyena meet on a sunny savannah safari?Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.Topics in this Series: Rainforest Rescue (Quarter 1), Candy Craze (Quarter 2), Safari Surprise (Quarter 3) and Animal Amusement Park (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Acting is an adventure! Young actors work together to create and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. What happens when everything is shrunk so trees are as tall as towers and bugs are the size of buildings? Young actors will create their own suddenly shrunken scenarios.Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the young actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with input from the students.Young actors will explore skills such as sensory awareness, listening, stage movement, character development, emotional expression, and observation/concentration while learning to portray their original character. Young actors will learn aspects of acting by script read-through, blocking, costume/prop discussion, and planning the show. Through individual and group activities, young actors build confidence in preparation for a final sharing for parents.Students will work from a simple, written script, but emerging readers can be accommodated. Parents will be emailed the script after the 3rd or 4th class and will be expected to help their children memorize their lines and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. All actors must be at least age 6 to sign up for this class.Topics in this Series: Pirate's Paradise (Quarter 1), Outback Odyssey (Quarter 2), Suddenly Small (Quarter 3), and Clown College (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Albert Thompson
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    In this class, students will engage with American History from a unique, thoughtful perspective, facilitated by college professor and doctoral candidate Albert Thompson who is a “researcher, problem solver, and educator.” Professor Thompson is considered a historian of the state, culture, and conflict. He was homeschooled through high school and will guide high school students to use “ historical data to advance solutions to contemporary problems.”Second semester will cover American History from 1812 through the Civil War and concluding with the Spanish-American War in 1898. The class will examine 19th-century America's transformation from a New World backwater to Global Power. Using speeches, pamphlets, legislation, court rulings, and treaties, the students will develop critical reading skills to identify and evaluate the social, economic, and political forces that contributed to the rise of the United States of America from approximately 1812-1898. The course will highlight the following key events and figures: Andrew Jackson, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Tubman, Ida B Wells, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Abraham Lincoln, Edgar Allen Poe, Frederick Douglass, John D. Rockefeller; Westward Expansion, the Indian Wars, The Civil Wars, and Abolitionism, the Second Great Awakening, Industrialization, The New Immigrants, Reconstruction, Social Darwinism, New Imperialism and the Spanish American War.The class will uncover history that is often overlooked or downplayed. Professor Thompson encourages students to think deeply about history by introducing individuals and groups in a way that lets students put themselves in others’ places. He covers the worldviews that were dominant at the time as a way to explain what motivated historical figures and decisions of the day. Conflicts will be closely examined since throughout history, war is a catalyst that causes economic and social conditions to change dramatically in the shortest period of time. Topics in this Series: First Settlement to First Crisis, 1607-1812 (Semester 1), Civil War to Spanish-American War 1812-1898 (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week on readings. Readings should be treated as pre-readings which students complete before class in order to engage in in-class discussion.Assignments: Reading assignments will be communicated weekly to students. This class will not have written assignments or projects.Assessments: The instructor will not give quizzes or provide assessments. Parents may elect to administer online quizzes that are available through the e-textbook website for purposes of assessment their own student’s understanding of major themes.Textbook/Materials: The class will use The American Yawp, and open-source online textbook from Stanford University Press (www.americanyawp.com). Students may read chapters online or download a pdf.What to Bring: Paper or notebook; pen or pencil; assigned chapter.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in American history for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol

    This class will explore the judicial processes of mainland Europe and their divergence from English Common Law. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves. Real historical cases will be studied, and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be debated from the perspective of Englishmen, from commoners to nobility, and Europeans in both criminal and church courts. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions, while striving for period accuracy. This semester will examine the Justice systems of Renaissance Europe up to Colonial Britain.Topics in this Series: Crime & Punishment in Medieval Times (Semester 1), Crime and Punishment in the Early Modern Era (Semester 2).Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: A mid-term and final exam may be given.Textbooks: None. Case documents are provided in class.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Dr. Erica Hughes
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    Students will travel through time and around the world in this survey of the history of art! The class will look at images of art as religious icons, records of historical events, myths, portraits, propaganda, conveyors of power and authority, and fantasy to answer the big question, "What is the function of art aside from being aesthetically pleasing?" Students will be asked to predict how their definition of art will change throughout the course of the year.This unique exploration of art history will be enlivened by rich class discussions, projects, visits to exhibits, and the instructor's own creative style and personal experience at significant historical sites throughout the ancient world. Students will learn about the people and concepts behind each type of art, considering that the conditions of the time influenced the art and architecture: physical location, settlement, innovation, warfare, politics, beliefs, religion, funerary practices, and interconnections to other, contemporary cultures.This study of the history of art will begin with the early 20th century, leap back to the origins and development of arts in Asia, Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, then return to World War II to trace the influences of a global culture on modern art. Starting with Cubism, Primitivism, Neoplasticism, and Readymades will allow the students to see the recombined elements before breaking them down by cultural contribution. Returning to India, students will discover the origins of Hindu and Buddhist architecture and sculpture and examine their many similarities. Next, the class will travel to early China, to trace the evolution from pottery, to stonewares, to the origin of Chinese writing on bronze cast vessels. The class will be introduced to ideas of the afterlife through the terracotta warriors and uses of jade before moving to Japan to examine investigate the arts before the introduction of Buddhism. Human sacrifice, ball games, and a fabulous slew of composite deities will frame the discussion of the role of art in Native American cultures from Vancouver Island to the southern tip of the Andes. Next, students will discuss prehistoric African rock art, the idea of kingship in Benin through royal portraiture, and the visual interaction of cultures through the Sapi-Portuguese saltcellars. Later, students will travel to Oceania to investigate images of the Australian Dreamtime, Tongan barkcloth, and Maori men's meetinghouse architecture. We will return to the aftermath of World War II to see how each of these elements is expressed in the contradictions and complexity of Modernist art and architecture. Finally, the class will discuss how personal and group identity can be symbolized in art, investigate environmental and site-specific art, and consider the possible futures of artistic expression.Note:All class meetings will be in a virtual classroom, providing synchronous online instruction via videoconferencing. Topics in this Series: Renaissance to Recent, Western Art Part 2 (Semester 1), Asia to Africa, Non-Western Art (Semester 2)Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments, quizzes, and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student's progress and workload. For each chapter, there will be open book quizzes, and students should be able to describe their three favorite works. There will be a semester project based on the creation of one's own myth and culture. Image recognition is key to learning art history. Each semester, students will be assigned approximately 60 images to identify on the midterm and final.Assessments: Points will be assigned for projects, quizzes, chapter summaries, and exams, and parents may use the total points earned to assign a class grade. Quizzes will be administered through Canvas.Textbook: Students should purchase or rent Gardner's Art through the Ages: A Global History, 15th Edition by Fred Kleiner (ISBN 13- 978-285754994).Credit:Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style each week and create a representative piece using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.Third quarter, students will look to Washington, DC at famous murals, monuments, and museums. Class projects will be multi-media creations influenced and inspired by the art and sculpture we view in the Capitol-area such as the Washington Monument, Natural Gallery of Art, National Cathedral, US Capitol and National Mall. Topics in this Series: Media of the Masters (Quarter 1); Animal Artists (Quarter 2); Murals, Monuments, and Museums (Quarter 3); Stellar Celestial Subjects (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Alchemy Ballet Academy
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    Beginning dancers will build their skills in musicality, balance, flexibility, and coordination as they learn to dance as a group. At this level, dancers work to identify, apply, demonstrate, and integrate the following techniques from the Vaganova ballet method such as: 1st-6th positions, marching and skipping, demi plié, grand plié, sauté, bourrée, grand jeté, and tendu, along with pas de chat, pas de bourrée, arabesque, arabesque sauté, and soutenu. Students will develop their physical conditioning by core leg and arm strength.A demonstration of skills learned will be showcased for parents on the last class each quarter. Registration is for one morning class, however students who wish to further their skills are encouraged to sign up for both Monday and Wednesday morning lessons. Compass ballet students will have an opportunity to audition for the Alchemy Ballet Academy Winter Performance (including excerpts from The Nutcracker).Ballet students are expected to wear appropriate attire. Young ladies must wear a leotard with skirt (attached or detached), pink tights, and soft pink ballet shoes in canvas or leather. Young men must wear a slim-fitting white t-shirt, black shorts, white socks, and soft black ballet shoes in canvas or leather. Alchemy Ballet offers an optional kit of one leotard with skirt, one pair of tights, and one pair of soft shoes for $25.00 or soft shoes only for $6.50.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Alchemy Ballet Academy
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    Young dancers will practice skills in musicality, balance, flexibility, and coordination as they learn to dance as a group. At this level, dancers will learn to recognize, understand, and apply techniques from the Vaganova ballet method such as: 1st - 6th positions, marching and skipping, demi plié, grand plié, sauté, bourrée, grand jeté, and tendu. Students will also develop their physical conditioning and learn teamwork. Dancers in this level must be minimum age 4 by the start of class.A demonstration of skills learned will be showcased for parents on the last class each quarter. Registration is for one morning class, however students who wish to further their skills are encouraged to sign up for both Monday and Wednesday morning lessons. Compass ballet students will have an opportunity to audition for the Alchemy Ballet Academy Winter Performance (including excerpts from The Nutcracker).Ballet students are expected to wear appropriate attire. Young ladies must wear a leotard with skirt (attached or detached), pink tights, and soft pink ballet shoes in canvas or leather. Young men must wear a slim-fitting white t-shirt, black shorts, white socks, and soft black ballet shoes in canvas or leather. Alchemy Ballet offers an optional kit of one leotard with skirt, one pair of tights, and one pair of soft shoes for $25.00 or soft shoes only for $6.50.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    While Napoleon’s Grande Armée was seemingly unstoppable on land, The Royal Navy ruled the waves. Total control of Europe (especially Britain) could not be achieved without control of the ocean as well.  The French Naval Academy was destroyed as a “bourgeoisie” tool of the aristocratic officers during the French Revolution. Eventually, the French navy was able to build itself into a comparable fighting force. After a significant loss for the new French fleet at the Battle of the Nile, the French rallied to join the Spanish fleet to engage the Royal Navy in one of the largest naval battles in the Age of Sail. The French and Spanish alliance intended to clear the Royal Navy from the English Channel to open the seas for an invasion of Britain. Instead, they were pursued by Admiral Lord Nelson on HMS Victory who forced a battle before his fleet could be outnumbered. Nelson's daring tactics crushed the enemy fleet and saved Britain, by the Admiral died at Trafalgar.

    Students will choose from among several options for their diorama: The Straits of Gibraltar, The English Channel, or Coastline of Western Europe. Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 10" X 14" diorama board, and sail a model fleet of 3D printed Ships of Line and Frigates that they have accurately painted. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical wargaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program 3-4 different whimsical, mechanized projects each quarter using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.Third quarter, students will build, program, and model perfect pets such as a Tom & Jerry (cat and mouse), a baby bird, a bunny, and a dog.Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished. Topics in this Series: Under the Sea (Quarter 1), Wings and Things (Quarter 2); Perfect Pets (Quarter 3), and Reptiles Rule (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Christina Somerville
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    Best Books for Boys is a facilitated book club just for preteen boys. Boys will read high-quality, age-appropriate literature and expand their understanding of what they read through book discussion and hands-on extension activities. Boys will be encouraged to interact with the story and each other through activities such as acting out or illustrating favorite scenes, discussing and writing alternate endings, prequels, origin or spinoff stories, or researching specific aspects of the story. Through guided class discussion, the group will be exposed to beginning literary analysis in a fun, interactive setting by discussing plot, theme, characters, setting, genre, writing style, and artistry using specific examples from the story. They will learn to analyze characters, their actions and motives, respond to hypothetical questions, make predictions, and answer prompts using examples from the book.Each quarter, the class will read one book that is teacher's choice and a second book that the students select as a group. Students must read assigned chapters from their books at home, either as individual silent reading, read-aloud with parents' support, or listening to an audiobook edition. Readers will be encouraged to take notes on key passages or questions. All books are selected from among Newbery Medalists and Honor Books, Caldecott Medal books, and proven classics of children's fiction.Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased so students can be "on the same page" (literally). Parents will be given 2-3 weeks notice to purchase the second novel of the quarter.Supply Fee: A class fee of $16.90 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the first novel.This year's selected themes and teacher's choice books include: Quarter 1- Courage: Rifles for Watie (Harold Keith); Quarter 2- Determination: Dragon's Gate (Laurence Yep); Quarter 3- Imagination: Haroun and the Sea of Stories (Salman Rushdie); Quarter 4- Strength: Some Kind of Courage (Dan Gemeinhart). This is a 7-week class that will have one week break in the 8-week quarter. The week off will be announced.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
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    If you like to "Turn Up the Music" (Chris Brown, 2012), "Play That Funky Music" (Wild Cherry, 1976), or "Dance to The Music" (Sly & The Family Stone, 1967), then you know that there is an impressive variety of American music. America is the birthplace of some of the most influential genres of music and musicians in the world. Much of the world's modern music has roots in American blues, jazz, or rock, while American music has elements from West Africa, the West Indies, and diverse communities such as New Orleans, Detroit, Memphis, St. Louis, Nashville, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and the Bronx. American music has influenced behavior and culture such as dance, entertainment, fashion, technology, popular opinion, lexicon, marketing, and more.This is a focused class in music appreciation for students who enjoy listening to or playing music. The class will evaluate a century of American music by listening to and discussing influential performers, writers, and producers. Students will learn to identify music elements unique to each genre- melody, rhythm, harmony- and will develop a musical vocabulary to help them think and talk about musical works. They will also explore innovations in instruments and technologies that evolved with the music, such as drums being placed in a "set" at the advent of jazz music, the rise of electric instruments, and electronic production/mixing.Second semester will explore music from the 1970s to the present encompassing the genres of post-pop, heavy metal, hip hop, rap, grunge, punk rock, new age, alternative rock, Indie rock, post-punk and new fusion. Featured artists will include Michael Jackson, Prince, Van Halen, Nirvana, Metallica, Snoop Dog, Elise Trouw, Domi, Jacob Collier, Gunna, Pop Smoke, Esperanza Spalding, and more. Discover why Kurt Cobain was influenced by the Pixies, how Taylor Swift channels Joni Mitchell, and Lady Gaga's music resembles that of Madonna. Find out why Rolling Stone Magazine declared that without "Soul Queen" Aretha Franklin, there would be no Beyonce, Whitney Houston, or Adele.Like other fine arts classes, music appreciation is a fun break from academics which enriches and engages students in a topic they enjoy. Genres that will not be highlighted in this course include gospel, folk, country, western, tejano, reggae, zydeco, or salsa. Topics in this Series: 19202-1960s (Semester 1), 1970s-2020s (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. .

    2
    Karl Peterson
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    Teens will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. This is a multi-level class open to Beginners, Advanced Beginners, or Intermediate Players. Instruction will be differentiated based on the make-up of the class, and teens will be placed in pairs or groups depending on experience. Since teens move quickly through lessons and enjoy the interaction of the game, instruction will be approximately 20 minutes, with 35 minutes reserved for weekly in-class matches that are monitored and supported by the coach. Beginners may play as a group against the instructor which is a low-pressure way to learn the game. Teens who are engrossed in their games may continue their play into Friday Teen Game Night.Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation).Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in logic/reasoning or and elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Peter Snow
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Advanced Beginner Chess 3, students will learn skills and strategies that build upon each other such as: later pins, using more or better attackers, using more or better defenders, identifying forcing moves, attacking teams (queen-bishop, queen-knight, and queen-rook).Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 15-20 hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Advanced Beginner Chess, or a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner Chess level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Peter Snow
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Beginning Chess 3, students will learn fundamental skills such as: discovered checks and attacks, pins and double checks, counting, checkmate drills, keeping the king safe in the opening, tactics (forks, skewers, x-rays), opening principles.Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. A student can enroll in Beginning Chess 3 as his/her first class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Peter Snow
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Beginning Chess 3, students will learn fundamental skills such as: discovered checks and attacks, pins and double checks, counting, checkmate drills, keeping the king safe in the opening, tactics (forks, skewers, x-rays), opening principles.Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. A student can enroll in Beginning Chess 3 as his/her first class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Peter Snow
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    Students will enjoy the logic and challenge of the timeless strategy board game as they learn and play chess with classmates. In Intermediate Chess 3, students will learn skills that build upon each other such as: making and escaping forks, pins, x-rays and skewers; overload, removing the guard, deflection, and decoys.Learning and playing chess supports problem solving, decision making, critical and creative thinking, general cognitive ability, scholastic skills, and mathematical achievement (Univ. of Minnesota). Experts suggest that the game of chess teaches analytical and disciplined thinking skills, while raising self esteem, teaching motivation and determination, and sportsmanship (Kasparov Foundation). Each class will be spent half on technique and half in practice matches with classmates while the instructor coaches. Students should have 30+ hours of chess instruction prior to enrolling in Intermediate Chess, a working knowledge of most skills taught in the Compass Beginner and Advanced Beginner Chess levels, or instructor permission.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    In this cooking class, the focus will be on what kids can eat, not what they can't. If kids with food allergies are tired of safe, single ingredient foods and long for creative, "composed" recipes, they will enjoy this class's menus which omit the top 9 food allergens: eggs, milk, nuts/tree nuts, soy, wheat, sesame, and fish/shellfish. Each week, students will make a delicious recipe with fresh ingredients and creative substitutions that the whole family will enjoy. The quarter's menu includes:

    • Moorish Chicken Meatballs
    • Chicken Avocado Rice Rollers
    • Quinoa Salad
    • Roasted Fennel
    • NOT Mac & Cheese
    • Fruit Cobbler
    • Sweet Potato Scones
    • Fudge
    Students will be taste-testing what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Please note that this class is offered first thing in the morning, after the kitchen has been sanitized and before other cooking classes that use conventional ingredients. Every effort will be made to avoid cross-contamination, but students with air-borne sensitivities should know that conventional ingredients, such as flour, milk, and eggs may be stored in closed containers in cabinets in the same kitchen. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female). For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Diane Wright Cobb
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    Kids will be introduced to acrylic painting in a small group class under the guidance of a professional painter and art teacher. The class will learn the theory of color mixing and the techniques of blending, building up color, creating gradients, and applying light washes. The class will learn how to select the right brush and how to use water to create different effects. Our new painters will practice using paint and brush strokes to create effects like light and shadow, dimension, and texture, and how to develop backgrounds, foregrounds, and detail work. Students will try techniques such as applying and removing paint, layering, stippling, and dabbing, along with wet and dry brush techniques. Students will complete several paintings on canvas boards. A variety of subjects, such as still life, animals, florals, landscapes, seascapes, fantasy, abstracts, or "mimic the masters" will be introduced to illustrate different painting techniques through in-class projects. Topics in this series include: Watercolor Painting (Quarter 1), Tempera Painting (Quarter 2), Acrylic Painting (Quarter 3), and MultiMedia Painting (Quarter 4). There is an $25.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Diane Wright Cobb
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    Tweens will be introduced to acrylic painting in a small group class under the guidance of a professional painter and art teacher. The class will learn the theory of color mixing and the techniques of blending, building up color, creating gradients, and applying light washes. The class will learn how to select the right brush and how to use water to create different effects. Our new painters will practice using paint and brush strokes to create effects like light and shadow, dimension, and texture, and how to develop backgrounds, foregrounds, and detail work. Students will try techniques such as applying and removing paint, layering, stippling, and dabbing, along with wet and dry brush techniques. Students will complete several paintings on canvas boards. A variety of subjects, such as still life, animals, florals, landscapes, seascapes, fantasy, abstracts, or "mimic the masters" will be introduced to illustrate different painting techniques through in-class projects. Topics in this series include: Watercolor Painting (Quarter 1), Tempera Painting (Quarter 2), Acrylic Painting (Quarter 3), and MultiMedia Painting (Quarter 4). There is an $25.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Danielle Mercadal
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    Can your child sit in a circle for story time? Line up for lunch? Take turns talking? This one-day, 3-hour (half-day) program is a "taste" of kindergarten for 5- year-olds. Start your child's week off right with "Monday mornings with Miss M" at Compass Kindergarten. Children will work in a small group with an experienced early elementary educator for this dynamic, play-based program that offers regular interaction and socialization.This fun, activity-based program will create rhythm and routine in a homeschooled kindergartner's week and give them a sense of community and a peer group. Children will practice routines and transitions as they move through the morning. Each session will include some simple structure such as a daily arrival song/greeting, circle time, story, snack time, activity, lunch, active game, and closing/goodbyes. Through games and activities, they will also practice key childhood social skills such as sharing, taking turns, and entering play with others. Academic basics such as the ABCs, days of the week, colors, shapes, and number sense will be integrated into activities involving fairy tales, nature and art. The teacher will provide ideas for parents to work on at home with their child during the week.Children can be dropped-off for this program (different than Compass's school-year policies for 55 minute classes.) Children should bring a snack, bagged lunch, and water bottle to each session. There is a $40.00 material fee for class consumables due payable to the teacher on the first day of class. Registration for this program is by semester (16 weeks) with priority registration for continuing students.. Students must be age five (5) at the start of the program. For families who want to extend the experience for an additional hour, consider registering for the Kinder Kitchen class at 1:00 pm.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman

    Students will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Winter Warm-Up recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Winter Warm-Up recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Winter Warm-Up recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Winter Warm-Up recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Students will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Winter Warm-Up recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    In Cover-to-Cover, middle school-aged students will read renowned classics and award-winning young adult literature. This book discussion group will examine a different theme each quarter to introduce students to literary analysis. Students will read, examine, and compare two full-length novels that share similar themes through facilitated discussions and extension activities which encourage students to make personal connections to what is read. The group will evaluate themes, characters, setting, and writing style.Third quarter, students will examine the genre of mystery and detective fiction through "And Then There Were None" by Agatha Christie and "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.Assigned chapters are expected to be read at home, either as read-aloud, individual silent reading, or listening to the unabridged audiobook. Students should come to class prepared to discuss the reading. Classroom discussions will emphasize the use of textual evidence when explaining thoughts and opinions. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as quote explications, thematic questions, or imagining a conversation between characters from different books. Topics in this Series: Adventure (Quarter 1); Historical Fiction (Quarter 2); Mystery & Detective Fiction (Quarter 3); and Sci-Fi (Quarter 4).Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below). Supply Fee: A class fee of $16.30 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class.What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Students will learn the language of undercover agents in this children's cryptology class. Cryptology is the science of secret writing which uses math and logical reasoning to decode and create mystery alphabets. Each week, students will learn one or more ciphers and will practice using them to decode messages and write secret messages to each other!Student sleuths will continue their undercover operations with all-new codes such as the Atbash Cipher, Running Key Cipher, and Four-Square Cipher. Students will also learn about fingerprinting, a key clue to real sleuths solving crimes and will mix and test an invisible ink that can only be read under a black light. The quarter will culminate in a collaboration to crack a variety of codes to flee a classroom Escape Room which may include challenges such as coded letters, picture clues, mirror image writings, puzzling word searches, and cryptograms.Topics in the Series: Spies (Quarter 1), Secret Agents (Quarter 2), Sleuths (Quarter 3), and Superheroes (Quarter 4).Supply Fee Included.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Kratos wears a leather baldric. Captain America grasps a shield. Harley Quinn sports spiked wrist cuffs, and Lara Croft wouldn't go to war without her weaponry. Great accessories and carefully crafted garments make great cosplay. If you are interested in the world of cosplay and want to bring some of your favorite characters to life, this class will teach you the skills to craft costumes and accessories.Third quarter, students will learn leather-working techniques such as dyeing, cutting, embossing, punching, and hand sewing. Projects for the quarter include a leather wrist bracers and a leather travel journal.In this class, students will follow templates and patterns provided by and demonstrated by the instructor. Pieces will be individualized through paint and embellishments, but the goal is for cosplayers to learn specialized crafting techniques that they can use at home to make additional, unique pieces. There is a $75.00 supply fee for in-class materials, the shared use of classroom tools/supplies, and some take-home tools to continue crafting at home. Third quarter, students will take home leather embossing tools.Projects are all-new from the 2021-22, so students may take this course again to hone their proficiency with various crafting techniques and fabricate new accessories. Cosplayers who would like to create original fabric costume elements such as capes, vests, skirts, and more, may want to co-register for this instructor's Learn to Sew classes. Topics in this Series: Foam and Plastics (Quarter 1), Resins and Metal Work (Quarter 2), Leather Work (Quarter 3), Mending and Alterations (Quarter 4) etc. Students continuing from one quarter receive priority pre-registration for the next quarter.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be communicated in weekly e-mails and posted in a Google classroom.Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Textbook/Materials: All materials will be furnished.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $75.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts/theater for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Kratos wears a leather baldric. Captain America grasps a shield. Harley Quinn sports spiked wrist cuffs, and Lara Croft wouldn't go to war without her weaponry. Great accessories and carefully crafted garments make great cosplay. If you are interested in the world of cosplay and want to bring some of your favorite characters to life, this class will teach you the skills to craft costumes and accessories.Third quarter, students will learn leather-working techniques such as dyeing, cutting, embossing, punching, and hand sewing. Projects for the quarter include a leather wrist bracers and a leather travel journal.In this class, students will follow templates and patterns provided by and demonstrated by the instructor. Pieces will be individualized through paint and embellishments, but the goal is for cosplayers to learn specialized crafting techniques that they can use at home to make additional, unique pieces. There is a $75.00 supply fee for in-class materials, the shared use of classroom tools/supplies, and some take-home tools to continue crafting at home. Third quarter, students will take home leather embossing tools.Projects are all-new from the 2021-22, so students may take this course again to hone their proficiency with various crafting techniques and fabricate new accessories. Cosplayers who would like to create original fabric costume elements such as capes, vests, skirts, and more, may want to co-register for this instructor's Learn to Sew classes. Topics in this Series: Foam and Plastics (Quarter 1), Resins and Metal Work (Quarter 2), Leather Work (Quarter 3), Mending and Alterations (Quarter 4) etc. Students continuing from one quarter receive priority pre-registration for the next quarter.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be communicated in weekly e-mails and posted in a Google classroom.Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Textbook/Materials: All materials will be furnished.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $75.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts/theater for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
    Add

    Crafty Kids Club is a weekly after-school meet-up for kids in grades 2-5. Kids gather and socialize while completing a craft around a monthly theme. An experienced Compass art instructor facilitates the crafting each week. Projects are selected to showcase a variety of materials and crafting techniques and to promote creativity and imagination. Each quarter, students will complete projects organized around two themes from among eight craft categories: wooden, wearables, simple sewing, painting, sculpting, paper, beading, and mixed media.Kids will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside a group of friends in Crafty Kids Club, and parents will appreciate the break! Parent Notes:

    • All the supplies are provided: No need to search high and low for the needed materials.
    • Reduce waste and clutter: No need to buy large quantities of specialty supplies for a one-time project.
    • Reduce clean-up: Leave the glue, paint, and glitter mess at Compass.
    • Kids get to experiment with a variety of materials and techniques, even if you are not crafty.
    • Crafting improves dexterity and fine motor skills, and an afterschool club makes a great social outlet.
    The third quarter project themes are:
    • Spy Tools (sample projects: decoder wheel and invisible ink)
    • Great Games (sample projects: shark & fish cup game and ball drop game)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Children are full of stories and bubbling over with big ideas! In this class, students will learn how to capture their creative vision into a simple story that they will write and illustrate. Third quarter, our storytellers will imagine time machine travel. Will they spring forward to a far-flung, fantasy future or backward to behold bewildering bygones?Students will learn how to build a Story Arc through guided, weekly activities. They will discover the key elements to composing a story such as crafting characters, posing a problem, advancing the action, constructing the climax, and writing the resolution- through brainstorming questions like, "Who is in your story?", "Where does this take place?", "What does that look like?" and "What happened after ____?"Emerging writers or readers are welcome and will receive support, if needed, to get their own words written down. Psst- don't tell your child, but this class helps lay the foundation in language arts for more advanced creative writing and composition. Pair this class with Acting: Kids Theater or Writing Well to further encourage communication and storytelling skills. The supply fee is included in the class tuition. Topics in this Series: A Great Race (Quarter 1); A Magical Mountain (Quarter 2); A Time Machine (Quarter 3); and A Fantastical Forest (Quarter 4). This is a 6-week class that does not meet on 11/2/2022.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Michele Forsythe
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    Students will delve into the world of crime scene investigators (CSIs) as seen each week on Law and Order, NCIS, and the CSI television series! Students will be introduced to the field which combines knowledge of biology, chemistry, and physics! They will learn how to examine a crime scene and collect evidence. They will perform labs and hands-on activities such as different kinds of fingerprinting, finger print patterns, and learning how to find and lift latent fingerprints. The class will practice blood-typing, identifying footprints, and making molds. They will further their skills in collecting and analyzing evidence through labs and hands-on activities that demonstrate fiber and hair analysis. They will test different fabrics, and learn how to use pollen and insects to determine the location of a crime.Our CSI detectives will also apply their forensic skills to several environmental challenges. Students will complete a historic pollen lab which provides clues about the environment 12,000 years ago. They will examine DNA samples from confiscated shark fins to determine if they are from endangered species, and the class will investigate the effects of ocean acidification on the oyster population in the Baltimore Bay. The environmental labs were developed and will be supplied by Towson University in Maryland.Students will use equipment similar to CSI analysts and forensic detectives such as microscopes and chromatography and combine those techniques along with logic, deductive reasoning, and the scientific method to solve mock crimes, CSI mysteries, and environmental challenges. Notes: For sensitive students, please note that while actual crime scene details and graphic photographs will not be shown to students, the nature of forensic science will suggest and reference crime scenarios.Prerequisites: Students must be able to read at grade level and have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.Assignments: Some weeks, students will be given pre-lab work that must be completed before they can start the week's lab activities.Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    2
    Mimi Nyman

    Students with a curiosity for culinary careers will explore many aspects of cooking for the hospitality industry and for themselves. In this advanced cooking class, students will make delicious, advanced recipes and learn skills that are the foundation for a future career in culinary arts. This class will get students excited about new foods, flavors, and techniques as they gain a working knowledge of food planning and preparation.Each quarter, new technical, kitchen skills are introduced, and each week, a new recipe is made in class that demonstrates the featured food group or cooking style. Students will also prepare a base or food pairing that showcases the featured recipe.Third-quarter skills covered will include nutrition, menu planning, and knife skills -Santoku. Chapters covered in the text include Level 2 Book, Chapters 2, 6 and 7. Third-quarter recipes that showcase the lessons on Meat, Fish and Poultry include:

    • -Roasted Chicken and Vegetables
    • -Stuffed Flank Steak
    • -Honey Dijon Salmon
    • -Chili Lime Cod
    • -Thai Pork
    • -Parmesan Crusted Turkey
    • -Steak Oscar
    Culinary vocabulary will also be introduced each week. Students will leave this class with an introduction to culinary careers in the hospitality industry and a beginning foundation in culinary arts. Additionally, students will be able to take charge of a home kitchen, prepare advanced dishes, and adhere to safety and hygiene standards. They will have nutrition-planning and cooking skills that will enrich the lives of their friends and families.Notes Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. Pork will be used in the proteins unit during 3rd quarter. All food supplies will be conventional, mass market available ingredients. Specialty food preparations/certifications such as halal, kosher, and organic will not be used due to cost and sourcing logistics. Topics in this Series: Stocks, Soups and Sauces (Quarter 1), Potatoes, Grains, and Legumes (Quarter 2), Meat, Poultry, and Seafood (Quarter 3), and Fruits and Vegetables (Quarter 4). Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.Prerequisites: Students must be in 9th grade (minimum age 14) to take this class. 7th-8th graders may not enroll. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Cooking assignments, practicing skills at home, and related homework will be given in class and e-mailed to students and parents. Brief written assignments may be given, such as recipe modification or development.Assessments: Individual feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments will not be given. At the end of the second quarter, enrolled students will be required to complete an online Virginia Food Handler Course for food safety certification through the county health department, which will cost $25.00https://courseforfoodsafety.com/states/VA?gclid=CjwKCAjw7LX0BRBiEiwA__gNw4AfZHgp_eOVTeiEXudxZhhF11E2UMggiIeYo6qL33xlUaDXbUeB5RoCG1cQAvD_BwETextbook/Materials: Students should purchase or rent the selected textbooks and workbooks. Used copies are acceptable.
    • -Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0138019389)
    • -Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts: Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380226)
    • -Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 1, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0137070503)
    • -Activity Guide for Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts Level 2, published by National Restaurant Association (ISBN# 978-0131380714)
    Required Tools/Materials Culinary students will be expected to begin to acquire their own tools. Students should purchase and bring with them each week the following basic, minimum tools and supplies:

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Shona D\'Cruz
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    Student artists will enjoy working hands-on, in 3-dimensions with a variety of sculpting and crafting materials to create original Decorative Arts. Assembling decorative items is multi-sensory, and students enjoy the tactile experience of shaping, stacking, forming, flattening, and layering a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Decorative art engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing, and encourages creativity to represent objects in three dimensions. In this studio environment, students will create original hand-made pieces using a range of artistic techniques and a myriad of materials to choose from.Third quarter, students will work with a variety of fibers and textiles to create unique, 3-dimensional projects. From fuzzy chenille to fluffy cotton and scratchy jute to scrumptious viscose, students will enjoy the tactile experience of looping, lashing, layering, weaving or knotting assorted textures in fabrics and fibers. Students may also work with burlap, felt, leather, muslin, wool, yarn, or string. Example past projects include a string sculpture, a knotted flannel scarf, a wall hanging, and wool felting projects. Students may sew embellishments such as buttons on their finished projects, but this is not a sewing class. A supply fee of $40.00 per student is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this Series: Sculpture Skills (Quarter 1), Marvelous Mosaics (Quarter 2), Fiber Arts Fun (Quarter 3), and Upcycled, Recycled Projects (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Shona D\'Cruz
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    Student artists will enjoy working hands-on, in 3-dimensions with a variety of sculpting and crafting materials to create original Decorative Arts. Assembling decorative items is multi-sensory, and students enjoy the tactile experience of shaping, stacking, forming, flattening, and layering a selection of materials to create unique, personal projects. Decorative art engages a different artistic skillset than coloring, drawing, and writing, and encourages creativity to represent objects in three dimensions. In this studio environment, students will create original hand-made pieces using a range of artistic techniques and a myriad of materials to choose from.Third quarter, students will work with a variety of fibers and textiles to create unique, 3-dimensional projects. From fuzzy chenille to fluffy cotton and scratchy jute to scrumptious viscose, students will enjoy the tactile experience of looping, lashing, layering, weaving or knotting assorted textures in fabrics and fibers. Students may also work with burlap, felt, leather, muslin, wool, yarn, or string. Example past projects include a string sculpture, a knotted flannel scarf, a wall hanging, and wool felting projects. Students may sew embellishments such as buttons on their finished projects, but this is not a sewing class. A supply fee of $40.00 per student is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this Series: Sculpture Skills (Quarter 1), Marvelous Mosaics (Quarter 2), Fiber Arts Fun (Quarter 3), and Upcycled, Recycled Projects (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Black Rocket
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    In Digital Clubhouse, students will begin exploring computer science by bringing a favorite Minecraft character to life in an animated short film. They will learn how Pixar and Disney make movies like Inside Out and Frozen by using the techniques of keyframing, tweening, texturing, and animating rigged 3D models.Digital Clubhouse is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in "Intro" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home. Topics in this Series: Pokemon Masters (Quarters 1, 2); Minecraft Animators (Quarters 3, 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Black Rocket
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    In Digital Lab, students will become merge the skills of storytelling and computer science. They will start with a storyline, design characters, and chose not just one ending, but many. Students will create their own text-based adventure games with variables, conditional logic, and images using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.Digital Lab is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in "Intro" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home.Topics in this Series: Video Game Animation (Quarters 1, 2); Code Your Own Adventure (Quarters 3, 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Black Rocket
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    Middle schoolers embrace technology and easily navigate digital sources like apps, webpages, and online video platforms. In Digital Studio, they will transform from users of these tools to the designer and coders of their own content. In this cutting edge class, students will learn the foundations of virtual reality (VR) design by creating their own virtual worlds, exploring simulated environments, and crafting memorable 3D experiences. VR projects can be viewed on a website or a mobile device. Students do not need a mobile device in class, but will need access to an Android or Apple mobile device to use the VR experience at home.Digital Studio is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in "Intro" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home. Topics in this Series: YouTube FX Masters (Semester 1) and Virtual Reality (Semester 2),

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Black Rocket
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    In Digital Workshop, kids will become immersed in the digital universe of Minecraft! Students will learn how to create a custom map, design structures to share between worlds, build with Redstone and Command blocks, and create custom textures for you to import at home or share with friends. Minecraft projects created in this class will run on PC/laptop (i.e. Java) versions of Minecraft and will not be compatible with tablet, phone, or console versions of Minecraft.Digital Workshop is a computer lab environment in which students work through the Black Rocket curriculum under the direction of computer science coaches. The lab environment allows students to enroll at any quarter, fosters brand new coders, and encourages those with prior coding experience. In the "Intro" level of a course (i.e., Part 1), students will work through the fundamentals of a new digital skill. In the "Continuing" level (i.e., Part 2), students who continue from "Intro" will develop new skills and will design and code an individual project. New students who enroll in "Intro" will begin with the introductory lessons. In order to differentiate instruction between new and continuing students, coaches work with small pull-out groups, pairs, or individuals to provide additional support as needed. The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of instructor-provided classroom laptops loaded with the required software, applications, and licenses. At the end of the class, students will receive access to Black Rocket's interactive learning platform to continue their coding journey at home. Topics in this Series: Python Programmers (Quarters 1, 2); Minecraft Designers (Quarters 3, 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Follow in the footsteps of the famed Andrew Lloyd Webber as you make the artistic and musical decisions for this Broadway classic: the story of Christine Daae, a beautiful soprano who becomes the obsession of a masked musical genius living in an underground labyrinth beneath the Paris Opera House.Have you ever wondered what happens behind the scenes to bring a production to stage? It takes a team of people to put on a show: stage managers, specialized designers for costumes, sets, props, lighting, music, and sound. There are also choreographers, fight directors, a dramaturge, a technical director, casting director, publicist, producer, and stage director to guide them all.This class will explore the different roles of the production team, designers, and crew responsibilities as students analyze a script and make decisions as if they were the Director. Under the guidance of a theater professional, students will learn how the pre-production and design teams develop the director's vision to bring a production to life!Students will begin with reading and analyzing a script without stage directions or notes. The group will make technical and artistic decisions to formulate a vision for the production. Students will learn to notate stage directions (such as 'stumble in from downstage right') and how to block scenes. They will make aesthetic decisions on set design and props, costuming, and technical effects such as lighting, sound effects, or music. The class will consider casting requirements and discuss the audition process. Example class projects include sketching costume concepts, creating a miniature set, and preparing audition notices.This class is recommended for beginners as well as experienced theatre and production students. Every script is different and offers new sets of challenges. The emphasis in this course is on the vision, design decisions, and the teamwork required to bring a performance to stage, but the class will not be putting on an actual production. Students who want to further their study of theatrical production might wish to co-register for the 2022-23 courses on sewing, Crafting for Cosplay, stage combat, or one of several acting/improvisation classes. Topics in this Series: Treasure Island (Semester 1) and Phantom of the Opera (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be summarized and posted on a Google classroom site.Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Textbook/Materials: Script furnished by instructor.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $30.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a copy of the licensed script and project materials.What to Bring: Script and notes.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts, Performing Arts, or Career Exploration for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    Dissection! The critical lab skill that schools skip and parents hate hosting at home. This lab can be paired with any independent study or online course in high school biology or anatomy in order to gain significant hands-on experience to complete a lab science credit. Students whose online or homeschool bio class dodges dissection are also welcome to sign up for the course.Students will investigate the comparative anatomy of a variety of organisms through a semester-long dissection study. Students will complete weekly dissections of organisms from a range of phyla, in order of increasing complexity of the organism. Dissections will include: a sponge, mussel, jellyfish, starfish, earthworm, squid, octopus, crayfish, grasshopper, perch, dogfish, frog, owl pellets (for small mammal remains), fetal pig, and vertebrate comparison bone lab. The class will conclude with a review and celebration.The class will cover lab safety, practice proper dissection techniques, and learn how to set up and maintain a lab journal with notes and drawings of organs and organisms. Students will also use microscopes to look at tissue samples throughout the semester. Students will have a pre-lab activity (video and/or packet) to complete each week as "admission" to the following session's dissection. Topics in this Series: Organ Systems (Semester 1) and Organisms (Quarter 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: Students must have age/grade-level dexterity and fine motor skills for the detailed instrument work in this class.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class.Assignments: All assignments will be posted on password-protected Canvas classroom management site. There, students access assignments, upload homework, take automated quizzes and tests, track grades, and message instructor and classmates. Students will have a mandatory pre-lab assignment that must be completed and will serve as the student's "ticket" into the lab session each week.Assessments: Will not be givenTextbook/Materials: The Anatomy Coloring Book (ISBN-13 : 978-0321832016)Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $90.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.What to Bring: Students should bring a paper or a notebook, pen or pencil, and a set of colored pencils to class each week.What to Wear: Students should not wear any loose, drapey clothing to lab. They should also come to class with long hair tied back and should wear closed toe shoes.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in a laboratory science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Pete Van Riper
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    Students will draw in a relaxed, informal studio setting, where they will learn the fundamentals of drawing along with the elements of art and principles of design.Third quarter, students will learn "create narrative" and tell a story with their drawing through subject, placement, and composition. Over the course, students should progress to draw more carefully and more accurately and to represent more refined details in their drawings.The instructor will demonstrate various techniques by developing a sample drawing. Students may elect to follow the class sample or may apply the drawing skills to an entirely unique drawing. This class is suitable for beginners who have never drawn before and for intermediate art students who have worked with other media and are interested in exploring drawing. Drawing can provide a relaxing, needed break from rigorous academic classes and over-scheduled lives in a fun, supportive environment.Topics in this Series: Everyday Objects (Quarter 1), Textures & Patterns (Quarter 2), Creating Narrative (Quarter 3), and Imitating Illustration Styles (Quarter 4).Workload: Work outside of class is optional for those who wish to practice their drawing techniques.Assessments: Individual feedback is given in class. Formal assessments will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $18.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a sketchbook, a pencil box with pencils of varying hardness, and an eraser. Returning drawing students do not need to pay a supply fee and are expected to replace their drawing supplies as needed, with similar or better quality. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Taliesin Knol

    The histories of modern England and France were closely intertwined before the Duke of Normandy conquered England, but it was frequently a violent history, notably with nearly 100 years of almost continuous medieval warfare. This class will learn about the beginning of the Hundred Years War when the King of England took to the battlefield to defend his claim to the crown of France.Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will create a 10 X 14 diorama board of a famous 100 Years War battle. They will customize their dioramas with landscape elements, waterways, structures of the time, and paint and populate it with 1:72 scale invading armies and adversaries for historical re-enactments.. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a custom historical wargaming rule system for moving troops and siege equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: The Saxon Invasions (Quarter 1), Persia v. Byzantium (Quarter 2), The 100 Years War, France v. England (Quarter 3), The Wars of Scottish Independence(Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Taliesin Knol
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    As the 100 Years' War devastated the common people of France, a woman was born who took to the field and rallied the nearly defeated French armies to resist the English. Joan, the Maid of Orleans, was inspired by visions from angels to drive out the invaders and see the rightful heir on the French throne. Once captured in battle by the English, she was put on trial for heresy and executed by a corrupt court. This would serve only to martyr her, and the English would ultimately fail to conquer France.Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical records, students will create a 10" X 14" diorama board of a 100 Years War battle Joan participated in and populate it with 1:72 scale invading armies and their adversaries for historical re-enactments. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate a larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the conquest while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a custom wargaming rule system for moving troops and siege equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how battles progressed and test different scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: King Arthur (Quarter 1), 1001 Arabian Nights (Quarter 2), Joan of Arc (Quarter 3), William Wallace and the Scottish Uprising (Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    Students will learn about the Cretaceous flora and fauna of prehistoric South America, where the biggest creatures to ever walk the Earth lived, or the swamps and islands of what is now the Sahara. The will meet the Argentinosaurus, Chilesaurus, Dreadnoughtus, and be introduced to the ideas of plate tectonics, species variation, and the evolution of plants.Each student will create an individual diorama. Students will craft and hand-shape their scene on a 10" X 14" foam board using artistic, model-making techniques. They will customize their dioramas with landforms, waterways, plant life, and paint. Once individual projects are constructed, students will populate them with miniature figures and combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to create a larger terrain. Students will then compete in a pre-history-based survival strategy game. Each student will have at least one board and set of miniatures to take home with them.This knowledge will be applied through several games in which the students will learn the characteristics of the various dinosaurs and other creatures that lived with them and how to cooperate in a group. In "Saurian Safari", students get to simulate a cooperative hunt through a Mesozoic game park using miniature figures of their own, and in Try-To-Survive-Asaurus," students will try to survive in the harsh and changing environment of the dinosaurs while playing as their very own dinosaur with the options of cooperating with or eating their fellow classmates. Over the course of the class, students should be able to explain the differences in the types of dinosaurs and plants found during the Cretaceous period in the Southern Hemisphere, and how these differences are reflected in their unique environments.Course documents such as maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Students must be minimum age 7 to take this class. Topics in this series include: Ancient Seas (Quarter 1), Cretaceous North America and Asia (Quarter 2), Cretaceous South America and Africa (Quarter 3), Ice Age Giants (Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    The Science Place
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    Become a world-traveling eco adventurer and earth scientist without leaving Compass! Study the world's most exciting and diverse ecosystems and learn about the incredible biologic and geologic phenomena that shape them. Venture into caves and coasts, tundra and taiga, and forests and fjords. Each week student scientists will begin by locating the fascinating features on a map before learning about these incredible habitats from the ground-up, starting with the geology of a place, then working their way through the climate, biome, flora, and fauna. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce regional and ecological diversity by examining rock types, classifying plants, observing insects, or modelling weather phenomena. Throughout their journey to fascinating ecosystems, explorers will keep a science log to document their discoveries. Finally, students will link their studies to current events in these regions.This quarter s journey begins at the highest point on earth Mt. Everest. We'll journey through Asia and India and see how these land masses have changed over geologic time. Why are there elephants in India and Africa, but not in the Middle Eastern lands that connect them? We'll follow the elephant s trail through time and explore the African continent and the world s largest rift valleys where the earth is literally tearing apart! Topics in this Series: The Americas and Antarctica (Quarter 1); Northern Latitudes (Quarter 2); Africa & Asia (Quarter 3); and All About Islands (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Juan Urista
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    In this semester-long course, students will delve into the fascinating technology of advanced aircraft and drones. First, the class will explore how drones are being used today, applications for drones in the future, and the role of unmanned systems operators. Each student will build a small drone from a kit. Students will learn about DC electronics by soldering and wiring electronic components and connecting the control hub, motors, blades, landing gear. The class will learn about FAA rules governing drones- even amateur, hobby drones- in our airspace today.Next, the students will learn about rotorcraft, such as helicopters, autogyros, gyrodynes and hybrid tiltrotors such as the V-22 Osprey. Students will weigh advantages, disadvantages, and applications of these blade and rotor- driven aircraft, including their unique ability to take of and land vertically. For these advanced type of aircraft, students will learn about weight and balance considerations and take the controls of RC (radio controlled) models. Finally, students will learn about hovercraft by repurposing their drone components and adding new elements to simulate a hovercraft.Due to Compass's proximity to Dulles airport and the risk of landing in a road, the drones will not be flown at Compass. Students may take their drones home to test fly, however, the drones must be brought back in working order for the hovercraft studies. If a student damages or loses the drone at home, a new kit must be purchased to continue work on the hovercraft. Please note, that the drone and hovercraft are made from one set of components, and the drone will be modified and re-engineered to a hovercraft. Students will know how to reverse the construction and return to  drone, but they will conclude the semester with one vehicle, not two. In addition to the drone kit provided by the instructor, students must provide their own basic tool kit and take responsibility for bringing it to class each week. The instructor will provide a list on the first day of class of items to be borrowed from the garage or purchased such as wire strippers, wire cutters, electrical tape, electronics screwdrivers, hot glue gun, and Exacto knife.This is a 16-week, semester-long class led by a professional in aviation.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    This full-credit English course is designed to prepare students for college level academic writing. It will deepen student’s critical reading and textual analysis skills by asking students to think critically about the “American Dream” and what it means to be an American by reading texts that engage with these topics from the 18th century to today. In this course, students will read and respond in writing to both fiction and non-fiction texts, and our analytical method will focus on rhetorical context (subject, purpose and audience).Spring Semester will feature The Great Gatsby (F. Scott Fitzgerald), Their Eyes Were Watching God (Zora Neale Hurston),  The Things They Carried (Tim O'Brien), and a selection of other short fiction and poetry.Writing Lab: An essential component of this course will be an in-class Writing Lab. Students in this class should have mastered the basics of academic writing, such as constructing a thesis statement that makes an argument and organizing their thoughts through effective topic sentences and transition statements. This class will deepen students' textual analysis skills with a focus on developing rhetorical analysis, the study of how a text makes meaning. Over the course of the year, students will develop familiarity with a variety of writing styles and forms including rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, critical response, close reading, opinion essay, and personal essay. Students should bring a laptop to class one day per week for in-class writing.This is a 14.5-week semester class that ends on 5/12/23 and does not meet on 4/21/23.Prerequisites: Students taking this class should have mastered the foundations of Introduction to Genre and British Literature (or similar English courses), are expected to take an active role in discussion and complete all writing assignments.Topics in this Series: American Literature, Part I (Semester 1) and American Literature, Part II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).Supply Fee: A class fee of $43.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class pack of books and handouts.What to Bring: Students should bring the current literature, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a half-credit (one semester) or full credit (both semesters) in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Intro to Literary Genres or Equivalent

    2
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    This full-credit high school English class will focus on developing critical reading and writing skills through the study of a range of canonical and post-colonial genres and texts written in English. Through exposure to a variety of voices across time periods and geographical regions, students will investigate major themes, such as the importance of language as a locus of power, the continuity of human nature, and the role of the imagination.Spring semester will introduce students to post-colonial texts and genres featuring Vindication of the Rights of Woman (Mary Wollstonecraft), Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen), Frankenstein (Mary Shelley), and Paradise Lost (John Milton). Other authors may include Achebe, Wordsworth, and Blake.Writing Lab: An essential component of this course will be an in-class Writing Lab. Students will write two or three critical response papers and a full-scale literary analysis essay each term. Students will continue to hone the components of academic writing, including how to construct a thesis statement that makes an argument, how to support their ideas effectively with textual evidence, how to organize an argument logically, and how to cite sources in MLA format. Students should bring a laptop to class one day per week for in-class writing.This is a 14.5-week semester class that ends on 5/12/23 and does not meet on 4/21/23.Topics in this Series: British Literature, Part I (Semester 1) and British Literature, Part II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level and have completed Introduction to Genre or equivalent high school level writing class. Students are expected to take an active role in discussion and complete all writing assignments.Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class pack of books and handouts.What to Bring: Students should bring the current literature, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a half-credit (one semester) or full credit (both semesters) in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Intro to Literary Genres or Equivalent

    2
    The Science Place
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    A powerful hurricane season forecasted. Polar ice caps receding. Hydraulic fracking. Solar power. Everywhere we look, Environmental Science is in the news! Environmental science is an exciting interdisciplinary study that merges the fields of geology, biology, chemistry, and meteorology to explain the earth as an interconnected system with both natural and human-made influences. This year middle schoolers will sample Environmental Science topics in a hands-on, lab-based investigation. Second quarter, students will focus on water. We will study the global water cycle, water chemistry and water quality, water tables, water reclamation, desalination, as well as environmental issues related to water resources including pollution and freshwater limitation. Topics in this year's class series include: Geology and Soil Sciences (first quarter); Atmospheric Science (second quarter); Water Science (third quarter); and Current Issues in Environmental Science (fourth quarter). There is a $10.00 lab fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for consumable materials.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Juan Urista
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    How can a pilot practice landing a plane in icing conditions with gusty wind at night or dog-fighting against enemy aircraft over a dessert? How do pilots learn the controls of a new aircraft or practice new FAA procedures? They can stay safe and sharpen their skills using flight simulators!In this semester-long course, students will examine a variety of flight simulators including those used for entertainment and training both combat and general aviation pilots. They will learn about the history and development of early flight simulators, like the wooden fuselage "Link Trainer" mounted to inflatable air bellows. From low-end hobby simulators to professional programs, students will test "fly" a variety of commercially available simulators to understand the different elements of interface. The class will work with a variety of software packages that allow them to design and manipulate scenery, weather, airport elements, and airplanes in order to understand the capabilities and limitations of flight simulation. In order to understand the tactile experience of flight simulation, students will build a mock-up control panel from a small plane. On several occasions throughout the semester, the instructor will bring his trailer-mounted mobile simulation lab to Compass for the class's use. This is a 16-week, semester-long class led by a professional in aviation.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Edwige Pinover
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    Bonjour! French Foundations is an introductory class for middle school-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, days/dates, etc), adjectives, greetings, and simple phrases. Students will learn beginning grammatical constructions such as noun-verb agreement, noun-adjective agreement, adjective placement, and the rules of regular verb conjugation. Students will be encouraged to speak aloud and converse with classmates, but also to learn to sound out, spell, and read beginning, written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes. Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and usage while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Students should be at grade level in their reading. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Edwige Pinover
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    Salut! French with Friends is an introductory French class for elementary-aged students. The class will be taught in a predominantly immersion environment. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students or explain difficult concepts. French language instruction will be presented in a natural learning sequence beginning with nouns (such as colors, numbers, clothing, foods, animals, family members, days/dates, etc), adjectives, beginning verbs, greetings, and simple phrases. Songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities will be used in class to review vocabulary and phrases. Emphasis will be on conversation, but students will be encouraged to learn to spell and sound out written French. Aspects of Francophone culture such as holidays, foods, and traditions will be incorporated in the classes. Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in French, so continuing students can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Fluency should not be expected at this level.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    The Science Place
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    Geo-Detectives discover the many mysteries of Earth Science. From large scale disasters that come from inside the planet to microscopic contaminants in the water and soil, Geo-Detectives look high and low to understand the forces, systems, and cycles that continue to shape the Earth, its climates and ecosystems. Geo-Detectives will explore concepts as diverse as fossils to fault lines, ozone to ocean trenches, and trade winds to tundra. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce geological phenomena such as examining fossils, classifying rocks, reading the seismographic charts, or modelling the water cycle.Third quarter, Geo Detectives will take a big picture perspective on the physical, chemical and biological processes that occur on our planet. We will learn about the rock cycle, water cycle, carbon and nitrogen cycling, primary productivity and the flow of energy through ecosystems. Topics in this Series: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis & Earthquakes (Quarter 1); Wacky World Weather (Quarter 2); Sensational Cycles and Seasons (Quarter 3); and Exploring Ecosystems (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    The Science Place
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    Geo-Detectives discover the many mysteries of Earth Science. From large scale disasters that come from inside the planet to microscopic contaminants in the water and soil, Geo-Detectives look high and low to understand the forces, systems, and cycles that continue to shape the Earth, its climates and ecosystems. Geo-Detectives will explore concepts as diverse as fossils to fault lines, ozone to ocean trenches, and trade winds to tundra. Hands-on labs and in-class activities will reinforce geological phenomena such as examining fossils, classifying rocks, reading the seismographic charts, or modelling the water cycle.Third quarter, Geo Detectives will take a big picture perspective on the physical, chemical and biological processes that occur on our planet. We will learn about the rock cycle, water cycle, carbon and nitrogen cycling, primary productivity and the flow of energy through ecosystems. Topics in this Series: What a Disaster! Volcanoes, Tsunamis & Earthquakes (Quarter 1); Wacky World Weather (Quarter 2); Sensational Cycles and Seasons (Quarter 3); and Exploring Ecosystems (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Danielle Mercadal
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    Discover geography and diverse cultures in this interactive, imaginary tour of the world. Each quarter, students will take a classroom journey to two distinct nations. They will locate the highlighted countries on the world map and complete a map project before buckling in for a fictional flight to the featured locales. Once they have "arrived" in the country, they will begin with an introduction to home and school life by meeting a child through a story or video. Students will learn to recognize similarities and appreciate differences when they compare that child's home, clothing, food, town, daily activities, and school to their own. In subsequent weeks, our Globe Trotters will learn about the culture and traditions of the country through songs, games, projects, and activities that highlight elements like folktales, customs, celebrations, distinct features, language, points of interest, or native species.Third quarter, students will journey to the island nations of Ireland and Japan. Sample Irish culture through stone rings and Claddagh rings; shamrocks, tin whistles, and Celtic art. Hear stories of mythological selkies, and learn Irish dancing to fast-paced Celtic music. Japan is known for Mt. Fuji, bullet trains, cherry blossoms, and snow monkeys. The class will hear tales of Momotar? the folktale peach boy. Example projects from these countries may include: origami designs, Irish finger-knotting, and drum making.Students will be excited by geography and culture when approached through this engaging, multi-disciplinary exploration of diverse countries of the globe! Topics in this Series include Indonesia and Morocco (Quarter 1), Sweden and Mexico (Quarter 2), Ireland and Japan (Quarter 4), Peru and India (Quarter 4)A supply fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Young girls will be encouraged to explore STEM through LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, girls will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.Third quarter, the class will explore marine and nautical engineering with projects such as a an airboat, a catamaran, a ferry, and a lighthouse.Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Throughout the quarter, famous female architects, engineers, and scientists will be introduced. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.Notes:(1) Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction. Topics in this Series:World Architecture (Quarter 1), Farm Fun (Quarter 2), Best Boats (Quarter 3), and Around Town (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
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    Students will continue to learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar. In this class, students will continue to learn basic melodies, chords, and strumming patterns for familiar songs from a variety of genres such as, "Sweet Jane" (by The Velvet Underground), "House of the Rising Sun," (by Eric Burdon and The Animals) and "Willow" (by Taylor Swift) chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day most days practicing chords and melodies from class. There is a materials fee of $8.00 payable to the Compass on the first day of class for a tablature notebook for any student who does not have one from a prior class. New students who wish to enroll 2nd semester should have at least 12-15 hours of prior instruction in order to match the pace of the enrolled students.

    Prerequisites: Guitar for Beginners I, or equivalent

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    You've dreamed about going to Hogwarts, and now is your chance to experience a year of magical classes! In this maker class, students will create projects inspired by their core classes at Hogwarts (Charms, Defense Against the Dark Arts, Herbology, Potions, and Transfiguration) and a Hogwarts guest professor. Students learn to work with a variety of materials and learn a broad range of crafting skills such as hand-sewing, painting, papercrafting (including precision cutting, folding, and stenciling) sculpting, and wireworking to create magical pieces inspired by the World of Harry Potter.Welcome to the third term at Hogwarts! In addition to your core wizarding classes, special projects will be inspired by guest Professor Flitwick such as Dragon Scale Face Paints and Floating Candles.This is a great class for Harry Potter fans who love the magical world, even for those who have not read all of the books or watched all of the movies. Projects and class discussions are geared to not reveal significant series spoilers. Note: A few classes may include a Harry Potter-inspired food creation or personal care product. The ingredients will be identified in advance, and students with food or ingredient allergies or dietary restrictions will need to check before handling/consuming. Substitute ingredients cannot be provided for those with food allergies or restrictions.Topics in this Series: Quirrell's Creations (Quarter 1); Pomfrey's Potions (Quarter 2); Flitwick's Favorites (Quarter 3); and Lockhart's Fabrications (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: Students should bring good scissors for cutting paper/fabric, a ruler, and a low temp, mini hot glue gun to class each week.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.Third quarter, Junior Artists will learn about the unique multi-media "craft art" of the masters! Projects will feature art with craft themes such as Van Gogh's Sunflowers, torn paper rainbows, Faith Ringold's story quilts, and sand painting. Art projects will feature a variety of materials and techniques to create craft art while learning about the artist, their technique, and their materials. Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Famous Photography (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.Third quarter, Junior Artists will learn about the unique multi-media "craft art" of the masters! Projects will feature art with craft themes such as Van Gogh's Sunflowers, torn paper rainbows, Faith Ringold's story quilts, and sand painting. Art projects will feature a variety of materials and techniques to create craft art while learning about the artist, their technique, and their materials. Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Famous Photography (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.Third quarter, Junior Artists will learn about the unique multi-media "craft art" of the masters! Projects will feature art with craft themes such as Van Gogh's Sunflowers, torn paper rainbows, Faith Ringold's story quilts, and sand painting. Art projects will feature a variety of materials and techniques to create craft art while learning about the artist, their technique, and their materials. Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Famous Photography (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kerry Diederich
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Each week, students will learn a few fun facts about a type of art, artist, or culture and view sample works. Then, they will create a project in the style of the featured artist or culture using a wide variety of materials, colors, patterns, textures, and embellishments. Young artists will have the opportunity to work with a different media each week such as tempera paint, various papers, color pencils, markers, tissue paper, translucent tracing paper, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, and watercolors.Third quarter, Junior Artists will learn about the unique multi-media "craft art" of the masters! Projects will feature art with craft themes such as Van Gogh's Sunflowers, torn paper rainbows, Faith Ringold's story quilts, and sand painting. Art projects will feature a variety of materials and techniques to create craft art while learning about the artist, their technique, and their materials. Topics in this Series: Imitate the Impressionists (Quarter 1); Famous Photography (Quarter 2); Multi-Media Masters (Quarter 3); Native American Art (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.Third quarter, students will build for an icy winter environment and explore constructions like a bobsled course, snow plows, snow mobiles, a Polar Express train, and gondola ski lifts!Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction. Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
    Add

    Students will use LEGO to design and build simple engineering projects out of everyone's favorite building toy! In this 90 minute class, students will explore concepts and vocabulary in physics, mechanical engineering, structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and architecture while playing with their creations.Third quarter, students will build for an icy winter environment and explore constructions like a bobsled course, snow plows, snow mobiles, a Polar Express train, and gondola ski lifts!Each class begins with 10-minutes of free build from tubs of LEGO components followed by a short discussion and demonstration of the day's project and concepts. Students build individually or in groups. Instructors will provide individual assistance, facilitate challenges, performance testing, competitions, and modifications to projects. Some projects may have been introduced in prior year's sessions, but each new build is unique, and student's building skills and understanding will have grown.Notes:(1)Students must be minimum age 5 and able to separate from their parents for this class. (2) Projects are built from shared, Instructor-owned components, so students will not bring completed projects home. Parents, however, can step into class 15 minutes before the end of each session to photograph their child's construction. Topics in this Series: Fantastic Fliers & Space Racers (Quarter 1); Animal Architects (Quarter 2); Winter Workshop (Quarter 3); Amusement Park (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    What is poison ivy? What if I get stung by a bee? Can I eat that wild berry? Kids have lots of questions about their own bodies and development. Kids’ Clinic answers these questions and more in the context of fun, age-appropriate medical lessons and in-class activities which will introduce children to themes in science, medicine, anatomy, and biology.Third quarter, students will learn about scenarios they might encounter outdoors while playing, camping, hiking, or adventuring. Just in time for winter, and looking ahead to summer, class will learn about altitude illness, frostbite, hypothermia, sun burn, heat stroke, and sun poisoning. In a fun way (to not be scary), kids will learn what to do in the event of storms or tornados along with ice and water safety. Adventurers will learn what to do for animal bite wounds, safety around snakes, and insect stings, outdoors allergies /poison plants. Topics will be covered with hands-on activities, short videos, and role playing games, and one of more activities might be conducted outdoors if weather permits.There is a supply fee of $20.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a take-home kit consisting of a medical coat, doctor name tag, class notebook, outdoor safety supplies. <p><strong> Topics in this Series:</strong> Doctor (Quarter 1); Nutritionist (Quarter 2), Wilderness Medic (Quarter 3), ENT/Dentist- Hearing, Taste, Smell (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    What is poison ivy? What if I get stung by a bee? Can I eat that wild berry? Kids have lots of questions about their own bodies and development. Kids’ Clinic answers these questions and more in the context of fun, age-appropriate medical lessons and in-class activities which will introduce children to themes in science, medicine, anatomy, and biology.Third quarter, students will learn about scenarios they might encounter outdoors while playing, camping, hiking, or adventuring. Just in time for winter, and looking ahead to summer, class will learn about altitude illness, frostbite, hypothermia, sun burn, heat stroke, and sun poisoning. In a fun way (to not be scary), kids will learn what to do in the event of storms or tornados along with ice and water safety. Adventurers will learn what to do for animal bite wounds, safety around snakes, and insect stings, outdoors allergies /poison plants. Topics will be covered with hands-on activities, short videos, and role playing games, and one of more activities might be conducted outdoors if weather permits.There is a supply fee of $20.00 due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a take-home kit consisting of a medical coat, doctor name tag, class notebook, outdoor safety supplies. <p><strong> Topics in this Series:</strong> Doctor (Quarter 1); Nutritionist (Quarter 2), Wilderness Medic (Quarter 3), ENT/Dentist- Hearing, Taste, Smell (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    Toffee. Taffy. Truffles... End the day on a sweet note! Students will enjoy making and eating delicious confections. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolates. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

    • Lemon Cupcakes
    • Strawberry Bars
    • Apple Turnover
    • Cherry Cobbler
    • Blueberry Jam
    • Edible Cookie Dough
    • Tart
    • Icebox Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Toffee. Taffy. Truffles... End the day on a sweet note! Students will enjoy making and eating delicious confections. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolates. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:

    • Lemon Cupcakes
    • Strawberry Bars
    • Apple Turnover
    • Cherry Cobbler
    • Blueberry Jam
    • Edible Cookie Dough
    • Tart
    • Icebox Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Kinder-aged cooks will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Festive Fall recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. In Kinder Kitchen, young chefs will make the same recipes as all other, higher level Compass cooking classes, however, some foods may be pre-cut and some steps may be simplified or completed by the cooking teacher in to support the speed and skills of the younger students. Students must be age 5 for this class. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get young students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be age 5 for this class. (3- and 4- year olds cannot be accommodated. No exceptions.) Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Kinder-aged cooks will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Festive Fall recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. In Kinder Kitchen, young chefs will make the same recipes as all other, higher level Compass cooking classes, however, some foods may be pre-cut and some steps may be simplified or completed by the cooking teacher in to support the speed and skills of the younger students. Students must be age 5 for this class. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get young students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students must be age 5 for this class. (3- and 4- year olds cannot be accommodated. No exceptions.) Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sarah Reynolds
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    Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect.Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order.Third quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Brown Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe).Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval. Topics in this Series: Blue Stripe (1st Quarter), Purple Stripe (2nd Quarter), Brown Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Black Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the t-shirt and white belt (new students) or $5.00 for the white belt (returning students). A belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, participants should wear their class t-shirt and belt along with shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers.Non-Meeting Days: None

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Learn to sew to create one-of-a kind articles of clothing, home decor, crafts, or handmade items for your side business like Etsy or Ebay. Sewing can be a relaxing hobby, a profitable side gig, and a practical money-saving life skill. Don't settle for store-bought when you can learn to sew the custom creations you envision!Second semester, Beginner students will learn the basics of hand sewing. Skills that will be introduced this semester include: quilter's knot, stitches (basting, running, backstitch, whip, ladder), tying a knot, and anchoring a knot. Students will learn to identify and use sewing tools such as fabric scissors, straight pins, thimbles, seam ripper, and various needles. Intermediate students (those continuing from first semester or those with prior experience), will learn how to read and cut our a sewing pattern, how to take body measurements and match to pattern measurements, and how to select the best fabric for a pattern. Intermediate students will learn how to finish pieces by selecting and attaching closures (buttons, button holes, grommets, zippers, & hook and eyes); gathering and pleating, using binding and bias tape, and attaching pockets and waistbands.Students will also begin with getting-to-know their sewing machines including different components, attachments, and functions, along with care, use, and maintenance of their machines. They will learn Identify parts of sewing machine; how to fill a bobbin and thread the machine; types of machine needles and how to change a needle, and how to control speeds. Students will practice machine stitches (straight, zig-zag, backstitch) and adjusting the length and width, learn about seam allowance, and sewing corners and curves. Students will begin with simple stitching exercises, and their first project will be sewing a pin cushion that they will use throughout the year.As part of learning to sew, students will learn about different types of fabrics, what each is best used for, and how to identify grain lines, bias, and selvedge. The class will discover how garments are assembled by deconstructing an article of clothing from its seams. Students will learn how to read a sewing pattern and take measurements The group will learn about hems and elastic along with closures and how/where to use them. Second semester's Beginner project will be sewing a custom pair of pajama pants, while the Intermediate project will be a small block quilt. Topics in this Series: Learn to Sew: Beginner (Semester 1), Learn to Sew: Beginner and Intermediate (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: First semester- None. Second semester- No prerequisites for someone to enroll as a beginner. Intermediate students should have taken first semester or have equivalent skills.Workload: Students who practice at home will find that their sewing skills are refined and perfected more quickly. Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class practicing the sewing skill/step covered in class.Assignments: Projects will be given out in class and will also be communicated via Google Classroom.Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Textbook: NoneEquipment/Fabric: Students must bring to class each week:

    • A portable sewing machine with bobbins. If you are purchasing a new sewing machine for the class, a Singer Heavy Duty Sewing Machine, 4400 series, model is recommended. These can be purchased from Amazon or Joann Fabrics for $160-$180. Students who are bringing a pre-owed or loaned sewing machine are expected to have the machine professionally serviced before the start of class.
    • The sewing machine owner's manual
    • An extension cord
    • Fabric for class assignments. A list of needed fabric and sewing patterns will be sent out the first day of class, with the recommended quantity, type, and deadlines.
    Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a project box, including a sewing kit (with 1 pack of sewing machine needles, thread, and hand sewing essentials), and other materials used in class.What to Bring: Instructor-furnished sewing kit, sewing machine, bobbins, owner's manual, extension cord, fabric, and images/sample photos, swatches, and other assigned materials.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts or Career Education for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Rebecca Sticha
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    LEGO Robotics Training Team is a semester-long “boot camp” and training ground for future Compass FIRST LEGO League (FLL) teams. FLL is a time-intensive extracurricular activity with fall competitions, meaning competing teams must “hit the ground running” at the beginning of the school year. The Training Team will allow potential team members to work through a complete FLL challenge at a more relaxed pace to ensure that they understand the project and enjoy the process before forming Compass competition teams in 2023.Compass Training Team members will complete a full FLL challenge from a previous year. They will learn 21st century skills in robotics and programming while enjoying the camaraderie of working as a team to solve challenges. Kids will gain confidence and build skills in leadership and communication. The Training Team members will compete in-house against each other, but will not participate in a regional competition in 2022-23.FIRST LEGO League (FLL) is an accessible, guided, beginners’ robotics program that encourages teamwork, discovery, innovation, and problem-solving. The FLL competition is comprised of three components: the Robot Game, an Innovation Project, and Core Values. The Robot Game is an annual theme-based challenge that encourages kids to think of technology solutions to real-world problems. Teams design and program an autonomous robot that scores points on a themed table-top playing field. Past challenges have been inspired by environment, transportation, accessibility, and exploration. FLL team members engage in brainstorming, research, design, and coding while practicing the engineering design process of building, testing, re-building, re-testing, etc. Students will work with LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robotics components and use drag-and-drop coding blocks to program their robots on laptop computers. No robotics or programming experience is necessary to join the Training Team.FLL members have fun with friends, encourage and support each other, and learn the art of gracious competition. In addition to the robot challenge, FLL team members compete in short, on-the-spot challenge problems in the Innovation Project phase of the competitions. FLL is also known for its philosophies of “professionalism” and “cooperation” which are expressed in the organization’s Core Values of discovery, innovation, impact, inclusion, teamwork, and fun. Teams are also judged on how well they promote and exhibit these core values.The Compass Training Team is open to students in 2nd- 7th grade* with the expectation that they could form FLL teams in the 3rd-5th grade* or 6th-8th grade* categories the next year. (Please note that grade determined by age-based enrollment if the student were in traditional school without acceleration, grade skipping, or delayed entry.) The Training Team will also expose Compass parents to the FLL program which will require parents to serve as assistant coaches and team parents on a future team.There is a $40.00 supply/equipment fee payable to Compass on the first day for practice competition materials.

    2
    Dr. Anne Taranto
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    Roundtable is a seminar-style literature analysis and discussion class for high school students. Instead of a broad, general survey of literature, Roundtable students will examine a focused, "special topic" in literature through critical evaluation and rich discussion. Written works will be selected for their contribution to a specific genre and their influence on society.Second semester, the class will examine post colonial literature in America with a critical eye on what elements are found in this genre. Selections this semester  include: A Passage to India (E.M. Forster), The Remains of the Day (Kazou Ishiguro), Things Fall Apart (Chinua Achebe), and The Heart of Darkness (Joseph Conrad). Short fiction will include stories by Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie, Jhumpa Lahiri, Merle Hodge, and Jamaica Kincaid.For this course, students should be engaged readers who come to class prepared to participate in intellectual discussion. Students are also expected to take part in in weekly class discussions by sharing their reflections and reactions to the readings and drawing conclusions and comparisons with other works. For each novel, the instructor will provide a guide with thoughtful questions and prompts on the reading that students must come to class prepared to discuss with textual evidence. The course instructor will serve as a facilitator-moderator to lead Socratic, "roundtable" discussions in addition to other in-class activities, such as partner and small group work, to further the class's understanding of the literature. This course will focus on comprehension and analysis through discussion rather than composition. Students will be assigned creative, short assignments to enhance and demonstrate their understanding of each novel such as re-writing a scene, imagining a conversation between characters from different books, developing a prequel or sequel scene, writing a review, etc.When discussing written works, students will be expected to give textual references such as specific quotes and examples- a higher-order high school and college-level skill that will be needed in later courses which require written analysis of literature. A key skill that will be taught in this class is how to annotate texts. Students will begin by examining samples of the instructor's own annotated novels then move to annotating the first short story in class as a group. For each novel, students will be given specific details to search for and annotate such as major plot points, character traits, interesting word choice, setting details, quotations, or questions. Later, students will be prepared to annotate automatically as they read with their own questions and reactions, a skill that can also be applied to the readings in other courses.This is a 14-week course that will not meet on 4/21/23 and will end on 5/12/23. Topics in this Series: Dystopian Discourse (Semester 1) and the End of Empire- Post Colonial Literature in America (Semester 2). Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: Students should be able to read and comprehend at a minimum 9th grade level for this course. Per Compass guidelines, accelerated 8th grade students may register for this course, however, in addition to the 9th+ grade reading level, they must possess the maturity to handle high school level topics and more mature discussion.Workload: Students should expect to read approximately 100 pages per week. For students who have challenges with reading, audio books may be used, but students should still be prepared to follow along and annotate in the physical novel.Assignments: Weekly assignments will be posted in the Canvas classroom management system. Students will need their own e-mail addresses to access the system, and parents may be set up as additional "observers" to their teen's Canvas account.Assessments: Points will be assigned for preparation, participation, and short assignments, and parents may use the total points earned to calculate a grade.Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, a "class bundle" of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased for students. (See Supply Fee below).Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $50.50 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the class book bundle.What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript. For a full credit in English, families would need to "bundle" this course with additional coursework in composition.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    LEGO Mindstorms components and motors are not just for building robots! These interconnecting pieces can be constructed into an infinite number of unique, mechanized machines- much like an erector set!Each quarter, students will build three or four unique inventions like A, B, or C. Students will incorporate simple machines, complex machines, and small motors into their projects. They will work with wheels, axles, beams, pulleys, tracks, gears, and specialty components used only in these classes. Topics in this Series: Inventions (Quarter 1); Creations (Quarter 2): Innovations (Quarter 3); and Apparatus (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Joe Romano
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    Coming Soon

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:-Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion-Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice-Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design-3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques-Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced designThere is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assessments: will not be given.< />Materials Fee: Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic. Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including: vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass; Adhesive: weld bond; Grout: bone or charcoal color; Cutters: wheeled tile nippers; Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes. Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including: All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain; Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone; Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange); Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system; Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid etc),cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher. Additional Fee: Tesserae by request and consultation with instructor: mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), specially cut substrate. All material fees are due payable to the instructor on the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment.What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    Mosaics is run as a studio art class where students create unique compositions and work at their own pace under the guidance of an experienced mosaic artist. Each quarter, students are taught new design, cutting, layout, and finishing techniques and are introduced to new mosaic materials which they can incorporate into inspired, original pieces. Throughout the quarter, the instructor will suggest possible themes for projects based on the featured materials, but students are always welcome to pursue a different direction.Students who are new to mosaics will complete a quick checkerboard project (complete with wooden checkers) to teach pattern, layout, and lines before starting an individual projects. For each project, students will be able to choose from a variety of substrates- rectangular, square, shaped, or circular backboards (typically first-year students), or special forms or 3D objects (experienced students). Each project will expand a student's understanding of color, pattern, rhythm, texture, and spacing as they complete rich, dimensioned compositions. Students will be able to incorporate other glass, ceramic, and porcelain tiles into their projects and may select feature elements such as beautiful glass gems, millefiori, sliced stone, metallic ornaments, mirrored bits, or shells, to serve as focal points in their mosaic piece. The mosaic can be monochromatic, complimentary, or contrasting colors. A broad pallet of colors is always available, and new colors are added each quarter to reflect the season.Students will develop a skillset for mosaic artistry over multiple quarters or years. As each student demonstrates mastery of basic skills, safety, and artistic expression, that student will be taught advanced techniques, materials, tools, composition, and color theory. A typical progression in mosaics is:-Flat, rectangular substrate, whole tiles, symmetric design, proper spacing and adhesion-Flat, circular substrate, tile cutting with nippers, themed design and color choice-Flat or curved substrate, cutting sheet glass with pistol grip, breaking pliers, and running pliers, composition and color design-3D substrate, adhesion substances, and techniques-Porcelain and ceramic cutting, special application, advanced designThere is no prerequisite for this class. The number of projects completed each quarter depends on the student's work speed and attendance in class. Compass parents are welcome to register for the class to work alongside their teens, or to work on their own, while their teen is in another Compass class.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assessments: will not be given.< />Materials Fee: Materials used vary depending on a student's experience with mosaic. Beginner Material Fee: $40.00 for a selection of Beginner Materials, including: vitreous glass, ceramic, mini, eco recycled glass, beach glass, glitter glass, glass gems, ceramic pebble, shells, metallic crystal, subway glass; Adhesive: weld bond; Grout: bone or charcoal color; Cutters: wheeled tile nippers; Substrate: 2D/Flat 12" x 12",10" x 10", 8" X 8", 4" X 4", framed mirrors, ornament shapes. Advanced Material Fee: $50.00 for a selection of Advanced Materials including: All Beginner Materials plus, iridized glass, cathedral sheet glass, opaque sheet glass, color fusion, millefiori, Van Gogh glass, natural stone and minerals, special effects glass, water glass, colored mirror, illumination glass, china plates, rhinestone, ball chain; Adhesives: weld bond, thin-set mortar, silicone; Grout: Custom colors (purple, rose, green, blue, earth, orange); Cutters: wheeled tile nippers, porcelain hand tool, hand file, pistol grip, beetle bits cutting system; Substrates: All flat shapes plus, 3D forms (egg, sphere, cone, pyramid etc),cut out sentiments, trays, glass bottle, mini sleds, flower pot, picture frame, sun catcher. Additional Fee: Tesserae by request and consultation with instructor: mother of pearl, 24 kt gold tiles (market rate), specially cut substrate. All material fees are due payable to the instructor on the first day of class by cash, check or electronic payment.What to Bring: In-progress project must be brought back to studio each week.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Natural Leaders
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    Natural Leaders is an outdoor education and leadership program. Each week, the group will venture into the woods surrounding Lake Fairfax for an authentic, immersive adventure featuring hiking, outdoor skills, leadership, and camaraderie. At each meeting, students take turns in different roles that are key to the group's success, safety, and fun such as: coordinator (plan out the group's schedule for the day); navigator (following the map, practice orienteering); naturalist (investigate and present a lesson about local plants, animals or ecology); skills coaches (research, practice, and demonstrate a skill to others, such as knot tying or whittling); game master (plan and teach an group game or challenge); and safety officer (present on a safety or first aid topic) They will also learn survival skills such as fire-building, outdoor edibles, building shelters, use of knives, and safety/first aid.The student-led portions of the program promote group cohesion, cooperation, and friendship, while students benefit from the positive peer pressure to come prepared for their weekly roles and responsibilities. Tweens and teens will also become more confident and comfortable as leaders and outdoor adventurers as their self-reliance skills grow. Natural Leaders is supervised by an experienced Natural Leaders mentor, trained and supported in providing a positive experience and managing safety. They typically have a passion for sharing nature with kids, and may have a background in a range of skills such as wilderness first aid, survival skills, tracking, primitive skills, and experience in hiking, camping, rock climbing, water sports, etc. Natural Leaders meets weekly rain, snow, or shine, in all temperatures. Students should always dress is layers for the forecasted weather conditions. Registered students will receive more detailed instructions about what to wear, what to bring, and where to meet prior to the start of the program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and watch the changes to the watershed.Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and watch the changes to the watershed.Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. Students must be age 6 by the start of the class, and they must be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of the class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and watch the changes to the watershed.Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature.(PK-K) Each week, ONE parent volunteer (with no baby/toddler in tow) will be asked to accompany the group into the woods to be the extra set of hands and eyes! Students must be minimum age 4 by the start of class, be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and follow instructions.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and watch the changes to the watershed.Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature.(PK-K) Each week, ONE parent volunteer (with no baby/toddler in tow) will be asked to accompany the group into the woods to be the extra set of hands and eyes! Students must be minimum age 4 by the start of class, be comfortable separating from their parents for the duration of class and must be able to stay in a group and follow instructions.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

     Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and watch the changes to the watershed.Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

     Witness the wonders of winter! Bundle up and look for signs of how animals live in the cold. Discover tracks in the snow, uncover nests and borrows, and find out who munched on twigs or bark. Observe transformations in plant life, moss, and fungus, and watch the changes to the watershed.Step outdoors to each week to explore nature with a senior naturalist/outdoor educator. Take a break from sit-down classes, indoor activities, and screen time to explore the natural world, get fresh air, and exercise. The group will explore the southern section of Sugarland Stream Valley Park in Herndon while they discover all the secrets that woods hold when you stop, look, listen, smell, touch, turn-over, and peek under!A portion of each session will be seeking and discussing what is found each season. Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things they encounter outdoors, observing and appreciating discoveries in nature, safe exploration of the woods, and how to be a good steward of nature. The class will also discuss outdoor skills such as shelter and outdoor safety. Students will play games in the woods to practice outdoor skills.Visit the Compass Nature Quest class webpage for more information on the program, location, and Frequently Asked Questions. Students should come prepared for class with outdoor/play clothes, closed-toe shoes, sunscreen and/or insect repellent, a hat, and jacket or layered outerwear depending on the weather/temperature. The group exploration/activities in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Does your child learn best by hands-on activities, crafts, games, and stories? Number Ninjas is based on the belief that children need to work with mathematics in a concrete, physical, and tangible way in order to learn fundamental concepts. Young students will love learning numerical concepts in this interactive, exploration-based class where work with numbers feels like a game.Third quarter, students will dive into geometry by creating plane figures and sorting them according to the number of sides, vertices, and angles. We will complete symmetrical pictures with pattern blocks and drawings. Students will compare and sort 2-D and 3-D shapes using everyday objects. We will build a in-class projects featuring shapes.This class covers many of the 1st and 2nd grade Standards of Learning for math. Weekly update e-mails to parents will include suggestions for practice at home and extension activities.Topics in the Series: Play with Place Value & Money (Quarter 1), Measurement Madness (Quarter 2), Super Shapes (Quarter 3), and Fun with Fractions (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
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    Venture outdoors each week to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. Skills will be repeated and reinforced each quarter, because the available plants, animals, materials, and water sources change with each season. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sevim Kalyoncu
    Add

    Venture outdoors each week to explore the woods with a senior naturalist and mentor while learning valuable survival skills. Students will learn how to construct a temporary debris shelter, make cordage, identify edibles, track animals, purify water, perform basic first aid, and use maps and compass (orienteering). Students will get to know native animals and key types of plants and trees in our area. Emphasis will be on becoming comfortable with things you encounter outdoors, safe exploration of the woods, how to be a good steward of nature, and what to do if you ever became lost or injured in the woods. Skills will be repeated and reinforced each quarter, because the available plants, animals, materials, and water sources change with each season. Students will have a blast, develop greater self-confidence, and build a strong connection to nature and to the real world! Explorations in the woods are for enrolled students only, and tag-along parents and siblings cannot be accommodated. For information on where the class meets, what to wear, and inclement weather, see the webpage for Compass's Nature Quest program.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. John Kornacki
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    Seventy-seven percent of Americans ages 18 - 34 do not recognize either senator from their home state and 53 percent of millennials cannot name even one US Supreme Court justice. Yet there are celebrities from Hollywood, the NFL, and the music industry who have recognition rates of 98%. Why are so many young Americans disconnected and disinterested in politics, government, economics, and most current events? One reason may be because these subjects seem dull and dated. They require looking backward and may appear devoid of things teens care about. Yet, an understanding of these issues is what is needed to ensure engaged, informed citizens who understand our country's policies and politics.This course will examine the top stories and news of the day and put them in the context of our political institutions and free enterprise system. The class will select topics and trends from the news and evaluate what is "really" behind them. Migrants gathering along our southern border: Can a president change our immigration policy? Mounting student loan burden: Can Congress erase the debt? Governors failing their states: What is a recall? This class will help students understand current events and contemporary controversies by connecting them to the building blocks of political science: American history, government, politics, and economics.This class will employ a Socratic method of teaching. Students should be active, engaged contributors, who come to class prepared to participate in weekly discussions. Students are also expected to take the lead by introducing current events that they have followed or investigated. Each class meeting will be approximately 2/3 discussion of current topics and 1/3 discussion/lecture on connecting the issue to relevant principles in political science and public policy. Students will be assigned weekly readings or videos which will provide background and context on the issues they are discussing. Guest speakers will include current and former public officials.Students may take this course on-level or at the Honors level. Honors students will be assigned additional readings each week and will have a one research or position paper due each semester.Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on homework. Assignments: Assignments will consist of readings and individual and group projects. All assignments will be posted on Google Classroom site. Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available. Textbook/Materials: The instructor will provide pdfs of articles. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as partial credit in American Government for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Diane Wright Cobb
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    This class is a multi-media art sampler for our youngest artists! Preschoolers will experiment with a wide variety of materials such as tempera paints, finger paints, watercolors, color pencils, markers, cray pas, oil pastels, charcoals, tissue paper, and specialty papers through a guided, weekly themed project. Third quarter, preschool artists will learn all about Textures through mixing and experimenting with a variety of media. Students must be a minimum of 3-1/2 years old for this class and be able to work in a small group setting independent of their parent or caregiver. Note: This is a 45 minute class that meets from 11:10 am - 11:55 am (students may not enter classroom until 11:10 am) Topics in this Series: Creative Color (Quarter 1); Super and Shapes (Quarter 2), Terrific Texture (Quarter 3), and Fun with Forms (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $12.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Kathy Preisinger
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    Preschool Players introduces 3-year-olds and 4-year-olds to many facets of the music- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (maracas, egg shakers, drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more). Preschool players provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement. Preschool Players helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join this class at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and activities are constantly introduced. Preschool Players has 40 minutes of structured activity, running from 10:05-10:45, with time before and after for gathering and transitions.

    2
    Dr. John Kornacki
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    Eighteen American Presidents guided our country through the century of the greatest changes in history: electrification, immigration, desegregation, and stagflation. First flight, deep depression, world wars, big bomb, baby boom, space race, foreign friends and foes. Communism, Cold War, computer age, and more.The 2024 Presidential race unofficially commences in January 2023, so it is a great time for teens to examine the highest office in the land. Meet the Presidents of the 20th century from Teddy Roosevelt through Bill Clinton. Learn more about the influential presidents like Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan. Meet less familiar Presidents who served during momentous periods such as Harry Truman at the conclusion of World War II, John F. Kennedy during the Cuban Missile Crisis, and Richard Nixon who opened to China and ended the Vietnam War.Join former college professor Dr. John Kornacki for this discussion-based class, where students will look more closely at the political, economic, social, and cultural context of the 20th century presidents. This class will integrate rich resources, presentations, and virtual tours from the network of Presidential Libraries and National Archives.Prerequisites: None Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class on homework. Assignments: Assignments will consist of readings and individual and group projects. All assignments will be posted on Google Classroom site. Assessments: Points will be awarded for the competition of assignments, quizzes, and projects, and parents can assign a grade based on the number of points earned as compared to the number of points available. Textbook/Materials: The instructor will provide pdfs of articles or links to weekly readings or videos. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as partial credit in American Government for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Dr. Michele Forsythe
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    Every parent knows that kids are curious, captivated, and quick to learn technology-based products. Programming Projects builds on that curiosity to introduce computer science basics, problem-solving, and computational thinking through play-based learning.Third quarter, students will work with Sphero Mini Robot Balls which are spherical, bluetooth enabled robots encased in a clear jacket. Think of BB-8 in Star Wars! Students can code these robots using "drawing" (literally dragging their finger on a computer screen) or block coding with Scratch. Students will work in teams to direct Sphero Mini Robots through mazes and obstacle courses, make them talk, and race them. Inside the Robot ball, there is a gyroscope, accelerometer, and colorful LED lights that are manipulated through simple coding. Once students have mastered programming through drawing on screen, they will learn to control the Robot ball through simple programming in the Sphero Play app or the Sphero Edu app on a phone or tablet. All equipment and devices will be provided by the instructor. Learn more about the Sphero Mini Robot Ball here. https://youtu.be/YxlLeiVo3gMTopics in this series include: Sphero indi Robotic Cars (Quarter 1), Scratch Coding (Quarter 2), Sphero Robotic Ball Quarter 3) and Tinkercad Design (Quarter 4)Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Students will discover the art of shadow puppetry and learn a variety of techniques to perform the art. Some puppets will begin with a base that students decorate and embellish while others will be created from scratch using templates. Students will create a small shadow theater and then practice telling stories with this method. They will create a cast of characters to tell fables and fairy tales such as the Fox and the Hare and the Three Billy Goats Gruff. Students should be able to use scissors for this class.Throughout the course, the instructor will also share tips and techniques for puppetry performances. At the end of each class, students will show and tell their classmates what they have crafted that week.By the end of this class, each student should have 6-8 unique stick puppets. Puppets will be kept by the instructor each week to allow glue to dry and to ensure that all puppets are present on the final day. During the final class meeting, students will showcase, from behind a curtain, a brief skit incorporating all of their puppet creations. Due to space constraints in the classroom, their audience will be limited to their teacher and classmates, but their performance will be videotaped and e-mailed to parents.Pair this class with Creative Storytelling or Acting- Young Actors Playhouse to encourage more creative expression and theatrical basics. There is a $20.00 material fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this Series: Finger Puppets (Quarter 1); Hand Puppets (Quarter 2); Stick and Shadow Puppets (Quarter 3) and Moving and String Puppets (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Daniel Greenberg
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    Students of all ages will love the energy and exhilaration of drumming! Students will learn rhythms and drumming patterns from West Africa and other cultures. In this "hands-on" class, students will learn hand-drumming on djembe drums and accompanying percussion accessories such as tambourines, triangles, rhythm sticks, maracas, and bongos.Students will learn the difference between steady beat, rhythms, and polyrhythms, which involve patterning, call and response, and different tonal levels. Drummers will be "in the groove" as they learn single stroke rolls, single and double paradiddle, frills, and patterns. They will be encouraged to experiment with different percussion instruments and to improvise.New drummers are welcome to enroll any quarter, and returning drummers are encouraged to return and continue to learn more complex drumming techniques. Drummers may be divided by age and/or drumming experience in class with each group taught the same rhythm with varying degrees of difficulty. All instruments are provided by the instructor.

    2
    Becca Sticha
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    Student engineers will be challenged to design, build, and program a robot to explore a simulated Martian challenge. Each rover will have to fit in a mock Mars lander and be able to drive out the lander door, down a ramp, and onto the Mars surface. Once in the Compass Mars environment, each lander must be able to maintain a course while driving over a bumpy terrain and pick up and collect red rocks while ignoring Martian rocks of other colors.Student engineers will be challenged to design, build, and program a robot to complete several unique mazes in the fastest possible time. Students will learn to program their robots to make "decisions" when exploring an unfamiliar maze such as "go straight until you encounter a wall" and "turn to the right if you run into an obstacle."Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, gyro, ultrasonic, and/or infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Maze Runner (Quarter 1), Sumo Bots (Quarter 2), Mars Rover (Quarter 3), and Explore Atlantis (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Alexander Shumway
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    Students will explore the science and technology of robotics in an open workshop environment. They will work in pairs by experience level and interests to plan, conceptualize, build, program, and test a robot of their own design. Student partners will set their own design and performance criteria for their robot. Will it be one that plays a game, gathers data, or completes a mission using custom code that the team has written and tested? This laboratory is open to beginners as well as returning students with prior experience.The class will focus on construction and programming, with the goal of having functional robots by the end of the semester. There will be an emphasis on the engineering-design process with repeated build-test-redesign iterations until the robot performs as expected. Student pairs will be encouraged to think creatively and apply problem-solving skills to find unique solutions to their scenario. Groups will move at their own pace, and completed robots may have different levels of complexity depending on the experience of the team.An experienced robotics professional will serve as a mentor and facilitator during the lab. He will not teach formal lessons but will instead circulate among the partner teams to trouble-shoot and offer advice on hardware and software issues, spending more time with newer builders and programmers. Students will enjoy the collaboration and camaraderie that comes from watching the successes, missteps, and eventual solutions of other teams. They will build with Tetrix Prime metal robotics components, incorporate sensors [such as, ultrasonic distance, infrared (IR) proximity, mini-LIDAR (laser radar), touch, line-following, color- sensing, or sound sensors], electronics, and motors from Tetrix Prizm, and code using the Arduino IDE. Please note: Prior experience with robotics and coding are not required. Also, students do not get to keep finished projects.

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    The aftermath of the World Wars remade the map of politics and economics. Two surviving superpowers were left to battle for dominance on the world stage, the USA and the USSR. Large portions of the global economy were locked behind an Iron Curtain of communist, state-run industry. Half of what remained on the free side had been bombed to rubble, leaving the United States the uncontested juggernaut of international commerce. The legacy of having run logistics for two world wars spurred important advancements in the global shipping industry, allowing democratic nations to emerge as the world's factories.Moving into the late 20th century, the class will transition from a multipolar world where nations enacted protectionist policies and closed markets to squeeze global traffic to the beginnings of today's market economy where free trade is the norm. The class will use a custom role-playing game (RPG) to simulate multiple, interacting industrial economies and global supply chains. Students will begin the semester as the head of logistics for either a global shipping company or a state-run organization like the Merchant Marine. In either role, they will be responsible for planning and implementing supply lines for their customers and integrating the improvements of 20th century technology. Their goal will be to balance investments in improved technology while still providing the lowest cost goods and services to their customers. Students will scramble to outbid their classmates for contracts put forward by the instructor.By the end of the semester, students will understand how improvements in technology have built the modern world, the effects disruption can have, and possible strategies for meeting those challenges. This will mean creating and managing detailed plans managing employees, equipment, and costs to be the most efficient operator possible in a custom role playing scenario. Topics in this Series: Global Supply Chain of the Early Twentieth Century (Semester 1), Global Supply Chain of Today (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Course documents including period plans, photographs and recreations will be made available through a class Google Drive link emailed to parents (and students who provide their email address), as well as a class reading list of articles/excerpts and YouTube playlist for any videos watched in class or assigned as homework.Assessments: Informal assessments will be given at the instructor's discretion, but assignments will not be scored or graded. Each student's financial success in the game will be an indicator of their learning and participation for purposes of assigning a grade. Parents will also be given shared access to their student's business plan with instructions and ledger, with instructor comments at the conclusion of class.Textbook/Materials: NoneWhat to Bring: Paper or notebook, pen or pencilCredit: Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History, Economics, or Business for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    In the style of an old-fashioned quilting bee or a sewing circle of long ago, Sewing Workroom is a dedicated drop-in sewing work session each week. Participants will enjoy the camaraderie of working alongside other seamstresses and seamsters of all abilities. Chat with others about their sewing projects. Learn tips and tricks from others. Become inspired by the wide variety of sewn items others are working on, and most importantly, ensure that you have a time set-aside each week to pursue your sewing hobby.Sewing Workroom will be overseen by an experienced sewing instructor however, detailed individual or on-going instruction is not included. The instructor will walk around the room to provide guidance and assist participants with tips, troubleshooting, or trying a new technique. Those who need more sewing instruction than the instructor can provide in the Workroom are encouraged to take private one-on-one lessons or enroll in the Learn to Sew class. Participants are expected to bring their own fabric, patterns, thread, notions, embellishments, sewing implements, and machine each week. The instructor will have an iron, ironing board, extension cords, and common items on hand (such as machine needles). Learn to Sew students are welcome to enroll in this session to have more dedicated sewing time. Parents are welcome to enroll with their child(ren) or alone, and adult community members are invited.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Ney Mello
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    Students will learn a fun, simplified way to write songs from a professional, award-winning, soundtrack composer. Each week, students will tackle a different phase of songwriting. This class is open to students who play instruments, sing, write lyrics, or a combination of all three talents!The group will learn about the song structure that is popular today with verse, chorus, pre-chorus, pre-verse, intros, and outros. They will listen to some examples of songs to convey what a verse, chorus, and bridge are, and will cover an overview of the basics of functional and classical harmony.Each week, the group will approach a different stage of the songwriting process, working through ideas on their instruments, writing lyrics, or both. Student artists will be guided through making their own background tracks to encourage self- expression and to allow individual voices to emerge. They can use songs they know as inspiration, but they will be encouraged to create everything like a real songwriter. Musicians will be given ready-made chord options so their focus can remain on the creative aspects of songwriting.If the student is only writing lyrics, he/she will be assigned a songwriting partner student who will write the melody and chords. In this case, the lyricist student will be provided with that song's work in progress tracks to write to at home.Students who wish to record their songs should download the free Abbey Road 'Topline' app for Android or Apple smartphones. (The instructor uses this app professionally to share songs and concepts via e-mail, text message, or over social media with colleagues.) The app allows the artist to record songs in sections and play back all together. Microphones will not be needed.The workshop is open to all instrument and voice students, not just guitar. Any style of music is acceptable (pop, folk, country, etc), but all lyrics must be rated "E" for everyone. Topics in this Series: Secrets of Songwriting (Semester 1), Secrets of Songwriting (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. .Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class .Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts or electives for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Buenos dias! Spanish Amigos (Friends) is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young students. Much like learning their native language, students will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. The teacher will bring toys and objects each week to give kids tangible, hands-on examples of the vocabulary being introduced.Third quarter, young students will learn about La Casa (The Home) and will practice vocabulary and simple phrases about rooms of the house, common objects, and food. Every quarter, basics such as numbers, colors, the alphabet, and greetings will be incorporated.Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so children can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. While the theme might be the same as that of a younger level of instruction, more vocabulary will be introduced at the older level. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Instruction will be predominantly verbal, but key vocabulary words may be written down for students to begin a sense of spelling. Students will be encouraged to write down new words each week, but reading, writing, spelling, and note-taking will not be expected. Fluency should not be expected at this level. This is a 6-week class that begins on February 2, 2023.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Buenas tardes! Spanish Exploradores (Explorers) is a fun, immersive introductory Spanish class for elementary students. Much like learning their native language, students will be exposed to the sounds, vocabulary, and phrases in Spanish through songs, games, stories, and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. The teacher will bring objects each week to give students tangible, hands-on examples of the vocabulary being introduced.Third quarter, children will learn about La Casa (The Home) and will practice expanded vocabulary and simple beginning about rooms of the house, common objects, food, and celebrations. Every quarter, basics such as numbers, colors, the alphabet, and greetings will be incorporated. In this level, students will be encouraged to begin to combine adjectives with nouns and nouns with verbs.Each quarter introduces new themes and new vocabulary in Spanish, so children can continue to build their language basics. However, themes and units are non-sequential, so students may enroll in this level in any quarter. While the theme might be the same as that of a younger level of instruction, more vocabulary will be introduced at the older level. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds, vocabulary, and simple phrases while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. Instruction will be predominantly verbal, but key vocabulary words may be written down for students to begin a sense of spelling. Students will be encouraged to write down new words each week, but reading, writing, and spelling will not be expected. Fluency should not be expected at this level. This is a 6-week class that begins on February 2, 2023.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Sirdley Taborga
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    Hola! Spanish Para Pequenos (Spanish for Little Ones) is a fun, play-based, Spanish immersion class for young children. Much like learning their native language, children will be exposed to the sounds and words in Spanish through songs, games, stories, interactive and hands-on activities. Limited cues in English will be used to prompt students in the first few weeks. The teacher will bring toys and objects to give young children tangible, hands-on examples of the vocabulary being introduced. Vocubulary covered may include simple greetings, color words, numbers, animals, and articles of clothing, and these will be repeated often due to the young age of the students. The goal of this introductory course is to lay foundations in sounds and basic vocabulary words while having fun and building confidence in a foreign language. All instruction will be verbal in this class. Reading, writing, and spelling will not be expected. Fluency should not be expected at this level.Note: Students must be minimum age 4 in order to enroll in this class. (no 3-year-olds). Students must be comfortable speaking to others in English, able to follow directions, and separate from their parent for the 55-minute duration of the class. This is a 6-week class that begins on February 2, 2023.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Angela Goodhart
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    Reflections on a rainy day, a sheepish sister smirking, a white-washed winter wonderland- all captured in dynamic digital images. Students will expand on photography fundamentals with an exploration of three special topics: nature photography, portraiture, and black and white photography. For each unit, teen photographers will learn techniques and camera settings that highlight the genre. Class time will be split between classroom instruction/discussion and outdoor photography exercises.Students will have fun taking pictures of friends and family. They will learn how to capture natural expressions and record unique personalities when photographing people. They will be introduced to the lighting, posing, and composition for creating studio and lifestyle portraiture. Students will practice as both photographers and the models.In the spring, students will take advantage of the buds and blooms to learn to photograph natural subjects. Students will practice seeing the world around them including details, macro observations, close-range subjects, and elements of composition. They will learn to do isolation studies using natural light to photograph objects and plants in their environment. The class will discuss and practice techniques for landscapes, seasons, weather, water, reflections, and animals in nature and captivity.Finally, students will learn how to make beautiful black and white images and what elements to look for to make a stunning monochromatic composition.Students will turn their favorite photos into a personal project to be shared on the last day of class.Prerequisites: Introduction to Digital Photography or similar class recommended.Meeting Dates: This is a 12-week class that concludes on April 17, 2023Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Students will have weekly homework taking photographs.Assessments: Students will receive ongoing, informal assessments and feedback on their photographs.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for composite prints of select photos.What to Bring: Students are encouraged to bring digital SLR cameras, but any digital camera that is better than a phone camera will be adequate.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    This class will pull aside the Iron Curtain, and uncover the secrets of spying during the Cold War, learning about far more than spying in the process- using an RPG (role playing game).When the world's last two superpowers faced off for fifty years, the intelligence battle had to go incognito. It was the USA vs the USSR, and any advantage could mean the difference between life and nuclear annihilation. No expense was spared as spying went Space Age. The real stories of espionage were just as interesting as James Bond and Q, and the stakes just as high. Computers worked on large scale to obscure secrets from invasion plans and to nuclear codes and knowing just who is really on your side. Field agents subtly advised potential allies and sometimes outright topples whole regimes with well (or poorly) placed assassinations.The class will use a Role-Playing Game system, designed by the instructor for the Spy Games series of classes, to allow for "Dungeons and Dragons" style game play. The class will examine the lives and techniques of real Cold War spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other. Once students have the enemy's secrets, they will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge. This is a 15-week class that will not meet on Friday, February 10.Topics in this Series: Early American Spying in The Civil War (Semester 1), Modern American Spying in the Cold War (Semester 2)Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Period maps, photographs, and re-creations will be posted on a class Google Drive, and video links from YouTube will be e-mailed to parents and students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mallory Shear
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    From superhero blockbusters to Shakespearian plays, musketeers to mythological heroes, and pirates and princesses, great stories on stage and screen have great fight scenes! Picture buccaneers Barbossa and Blackbeard in Pirates of the Caribbean or Rey versus Ren in the Star Wars sagas. Sometimes they use weapons and sometimes just their bare hands. Fight scenes can be thrilling, heart-breaking, or hilarious. This is the art of Stage Combat- creating the illusion of violence for storytelling in entertainment!Third quarter, students will learn techniques for single-handed sword-fighting used for thrusting blades such as the rapier or epee. They will learn 5 cuts (attacks), 6 parries (deflecting), and basic footwork. Students will practice two 'pris de fer' moves (taking the steel) and how to feign two types of wounds. They will discuss the art of storytelling through stage combat and develop a short, choreographed sword fight.Aspects of stage combat may look like fencing and martial arts, but are instead a different set of theatrical skills that mimic the contact sports, often in a dramatic and choreographed manner meant to convey conflict on stage or screen. Emphasis in stage combat is on safety, so techniques are learned and rehearsed in slow-motion and at increased distance between partners. Students will work with blunt, wooden dowels instead of bladed training weapons. The instructor will present and frequently review class safety rules. This class is best suited for students who are focused, have self-discipline, can follow instructions, and can work in a group. Topics in this Series: Bare Fists and Brawls- Unarmed Combat (Quarter 1); Comedy in Combat (Quarter 2), Swashbuckling, Single-Handed Sword (Quarter 3) Dueling, Double-Handed Broadsword (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Monica Dorosheff
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    Learn to play the violin! Students will learn the fundamentals of playing the violin using the Suzuki method. They will begin by learning how to hold the instrument, how to correctly grasp the bow, parts of the instrument, and the names of the open strings. Students will be taught sequential techniques by adding one finger at a time to each string until they can play a complete scale followed by simple songs.Music education enhances teamwork and cooperative learning and provides children with a path for self-expression. Scientific research has shown that music lessons not only improve organizational skills and executive functioning but that they also develop self-confidence.Class Expectations: A student violin can be purchased or rented from most music stores (Foxes Music Company in Falls Church is recommended). The student should be professionally measured and fitted for the violin by the music store or a string luthier. Students should also have a shoulder rest fitted to their violin. Students will be asked to bring their violin, bow, shoulder rest, case, small notebook, Suzuki music book, and pencil to every class. In order to fully benefit from the in-class instruction, daily, at-home practice is expected.  Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $23.30, payable to Compass, for a copy of the Suzuki Book 1 with CD, which students will begin to use mid-semester.This is a 15-week semester class, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

    2
    Monica Dorosheff
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    Continue to learn to play the violin! Students will learn more advanced skills such as shifting on the violin and playing vibrato. Students will learn to play violin repertoires and practice additional scales. The class will be taught to play in unison from a songbook of arranged works. At the end of the semester, the class will be able to play several short pieces and will perform for the parents.Music education enhances teamwork and cooperative learning and provides children with a path for self-expression. Scientific research has shown that music lessons not only improve organizational skills and executive functioning but that they also develop self-confidence.Semester 1, Beginner Violin I students will have priority registration to enroll in Beginner Violin II to continue their musical education. Other students may enroll in the second semester if they have had prior instruction equal to the first semester, or if they are willing to schedule and pay for individual lessons with this instructor to cover 1st semester skills prior to or around the start of the class. Those wishing to enroll in 2nd semester course without the Compass 1st semester class will be asked to play for the instructor in order to demonstrate skill level and establish placement.Class Expectations: A student violin can be purchased or rented from most music stores (Foxes Music Company in Falls Church is recommended). The student should be professionally measured and fitted for the violin by the music store or a string luthier. Students should also have a shoulder rest fitted to their violin. Students will be asked to bring their violin, bow, shoulder rest, case, small notebook, Suzuki music book, and pencil to every class. In order to fully benefit from the in-class instruction, daily, at-home practice is expected.  Supply Fee: Students who do not have the Suzuki Book 1 with CD set from Starting with Strings I will be asked to pay a supply fee of $23.30 for the book.This is a 15-week semester class, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

    2
    Monica Dorosheff
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    Students who play violin, viola, cello, or bass are invited to join this homeschool string ensemble! Musicians will have an opportunity to develop orchestral skills and enjoy the experience of practicing, playing, and performing as a group. The class will start each week with tuning and warm-ups such as playing musical scales and simple exercises. Then the class will work on several group songs each semester where they will improve musical literacy, learn to follow the directions from the conductor, and learn to play in different keys-- as a group. During the final class of the semester, a concert will be held for friends and family.This orchestra is intended for advanced beginner, intermediate, and advanced strings students who are currently and concurrently enrolled in private lessons. As a guideline, a student should be able to play a D major scale in two octaves on his/her instrument. Students are expected to be able to locate notes on their instruments, read music and be able to identify all rhythmical patterns. Students with less experience will be asked to play for the conductor or to submit a brief video to help establish placement.The instructor will provide the ensemble repertoires, and these arrangements will be specially composed to accommodate the range of abilities of all stringed players in the orchestra. Participants are expected to prepare and practice at home for at least 15 - 20 minutes per day. The cost of the class music is included. This is a 15-week semester program, and the week off will be announced by the instructor.

    Prerequisites: See description for proficiency level needed

    2
    Mimi Nyman
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    The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.

    • Lemon Cupcakes
    • Strawberry Bars
    • Apple Turnover
    • Cherry Cobbler
    • Blueberry Jam
    • Edible Cookie Dough
    • Tart
    • Icebox Cake
    Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:
    • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group. Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Mimi Nyman
    Add

    The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts.

    • Lemon Cupcakes
    • Strawberry Bars
    • Apple Turnover
    • Cherry Cobbler
    • Blueberry Jam
    • Edible Cookie Dough
    • Tart
    • Icebox Cake
    Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Each week they will prepare a fresh, handmade dessert or sweet such as: pies, cakes, cookies, tarts, trifles, mousses, puddings, candies, fudge, brittle, or chocolate. The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers' culinary adventures will include:
    • Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. This engaging sweets class will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week.Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group. Topics in this Series: Decadent Delights (Quarter 1); Gooey Goodies (Quarter 2), Best Bon Bons (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).Assessments: Qualitative Feedback will be given in class. Formal grades/assessment will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided.What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in career exploration, fine arts, or electives for purposes of a high school transcript. For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    YMCA
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    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.During the first lesson, students will be observed and determined to be Beginner or Advanced Beginner level, and the class will be divided accordingly among two instructors. Beginners level is for students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills such as water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Advanced Beginners level will review all skills in beginner-level class and add YMCA Level 2 skills such as stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke.Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
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    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.During the first lesson, students will be observed and determined to be Beginner or Advanced Beginner level, and the class will be divided accordingly among two instructors. Beginners level is for students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills such as water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Advanced Beginners level will review all skills in beginner-level class and add YMCA Level 2 skills such as stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke.Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.During the first lesson, students will be observed and determined to be Beginner or Advanced Beginner level, and the class will be divided accordingly among two instructors. Beginners level is for students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills such as water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Advanced Beginners level will review all skills in beginner-level class and add YMCA Level 2 skills such as stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke.Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
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    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.Young Beginners is for very young students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills including water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water.Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    YMCA
    Add

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.Young Beginners is for very young students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills including water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water.Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

    2
    Jeff Virchow
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    Snappy comebacks, one-liners, sarcasm, exaggeration, irony...and teenagers. These things just go together! Improv gives kids an outlet for fun, creative stories and spontaneous humor. Teens who find amusement in the unexpected and humor in the unpredictable will enjoy improvisational acting!Second semester, actors will continue to hone their "short game", or short form improv skills. Class activities will teach students how to do edits, perfect their scene work, create characters, escalate emotions, elevate relationships, and use object work to create a more involved stories. They learn about timing, transitions, and how to connect scenes and travel through the improv story with recurring characters, patterns, and common themes to portray a hilarious or witty situation. Class exercises will help students improve listening stills and build the collective, group imagination.Improvisation is the art of entertaining with connected, unpredictable twists and turns often seen from the great comedians and best live entertainers. Improv students will improve their ability to think on-their-feet, play off each other, and react with spontaneous wit, sarcasm, and irony. Actors' creative thinking and communication skills will be strengthened as they work "outside-of-the-box" and learn to read their audience.Improv can be for everyone! No previous experience is needed. Beginners are welcome, and experienced students will further develop their improv skills. If you have taken this class before, go ahead and take it again because no two classes are ever alike. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, flexible, and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work collaboratively in a group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. Topics in this Series: Innovative Improv (Semester 1), Immersive Improv (Semester 2. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class.Assignments: If any, will be sent to parents and students by e-mail.Assessments: Informal, qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Erica Hughes
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    Coming Soon

    2
    Dr. Michele Forsythe
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    "S" is for science, and "A" is for art in the study of STEAM, but have you thought about the science in art? Artists must understand the science of the materials that the use: how they tint and texturize, mix and melt, dye and dry, blend or bend. There is a complex community of scientists and engineers with specialties in polymers, glass, chemicals, paper, and textiles who design the materials that artists use to create their art. This class will learn about the science and properties of some unique artistic processes and materials and how and why they work.Third quarter, the class will examine optical illusions and color, with activities involving fractals and the visual phenomena such as the transformative art of Escher and mystifying mobius strips. Students will learn about the neuroscience and psychology of color and the properties of light including refraction through water and prisms to understand the component colors. The class will use some computer applications and some designs on paper to observe and recreate the Munker-White Illusion (color stripes distorting color perception), the Muller-Lyer Illusion (size distortion), and fractal phenomena. In-class projects will also incorporate depth reversion, such as ambiguous 3-D cube, shading to represent form, design-your-own Escher like patterns, and experiments with line density and distribution on a spinning disk!Topics in this series: Resins & Polymers (Quarter 1), Paints & Dyes (Quarter 2), Optical Illusions & Color (Quarter 3), and Paper Engineers (Quarter 4).Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Judith Harmon
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    Tweens take over as they collectively brainstorm and collaboratively write own play. Find out what happens when tweens "act out" the unique characters and an original storyline they created. What happens when colorful characters have to escape? Will it be a cakewalk for our sherlocks to crack the code, unblock locks, and walk before the clock stops?Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with the students' input.The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity.Topics in this Series: Haunted House of Horrors (Quarter 1), Chaos in the Courtroom (Quarter 2), No Exit Escape Room (Quarter 3) and Rock Start Rivalry (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Wyndy Frederick
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    Did you know that the ukulele is not just a miniature guitar? It is a member of the Portuguese lute family, but its sound was popularized in Hawaiian music. Ukulele's fun, compact size also appeals to kids and is a great "first" stringed instrument! In this class, kids will continue to build their skills on ukulele. Students will learn expansion of chords, to include minor chords, 7th chords, sharps, and flats. They will begin to play individual notes and chords on each piece that they learn and will learn self-accompaniment. Sample songs taught at this level include “You Are My Sunshine”, “Michael Row the Boat Ashore”, “Octopus’ Garden”, “Rainbow Connection”, and “All My Loving”. Each student should purchase or rent a good quality ukulele for the class.Semester 1, Ukulele for Beginner I students will have priority registration to enroll in Beginner 2 level to continue their musical education. Other students may enroll in the second semester if they have had prior instruction equal to the first semester, or if they are willing to schedule and pay for individual lessons with this instructor to cover 1st semester skills prior to or around the start of the class. Those wishing to enroll in 2nd semester course without the Compass 1st semester class will be asked to play for the instructor in order to demonstrate skill level and establish placement.Lab/Supply Fee: For new students, there is a class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a music notebook. This is a 16-week semester class.

    2
    Joe Romano
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    Curious coins, baffling balls, confounding cards, and puzzling papers! Students will learn tricks of the trade from a professional magician using the Discover Magic curriculum! This class will present tricks from the Blue Wand curriculum.Each week, kids will learn how to perform a unique magic trick, and students will practice and perfect the illusion in class so they can come home and mystify their friends and family. Students will unlock the secrets to seven special magic tricks this quarter. For each trick, students will receive a custom magic prop and full color instructions, and at the end of each class, every magician will take home a Top Secret file folder with additional tricks they can practice. Student magicians will be given a secret password each week to gain access to an additional magic trick on the Discover Magic website (parents will need to work the magic to set up the child's online account.) Along with the actual magic, students will discuss a life skill each week that is essential to a good magician (and student) such as public speaking, presentation skills, practicing, being prepared, and reading your audience. Magicians who complete the class will receive a certificate and magic wand. Topics in this Series:Bewildering Black Wand (Quarter 1); Groovy Green Wand (Quarter 2); Baffling Blue Wand (Quarter 3); Orange Wand Wonders (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. This is a 7-week class that does not meet on 3/8/23

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    A corn snake with cataracts, a lizard with a limp, or an iguana with an itch. Sometimes even our reptile friends need medical care! Lots of kids love animals, and some even think about becoming veterinarians and animal specialists. There is a lot of science in the care and keeping of animals.In this class, future veterinarians will learn all about the reptile species people keep as pets such as snakes, turtles, tortoises, skinks, and lizards such as geckos, bearded dragons, chameleons, and uromastyxs. Each of these different species has different needs in terms of diets, habitats, and handling. The class will discuss some general signs of illness or injury that someone might see in a pet reptile. Kids will discover some of fun and fascinating facts, similarities, and differences in species of reptiles. The class will make a broad survey of reptiles in the wild and discuss why those found outdoors should not be brought in as pets and why pet reptiles should not be released into the wild.Each class meeting will include hands-on and interactive demonstrations, simulations, role-playing, activities, games, stories, or short video clips to convey the information. During the first week, students will receive a lab coat and clinic name tag, and two model reptiles for demonstrations, and a class workbook. They will "adopt" and name their reptiles, and during the final week, they will receive a diploma. (Pets, lab coats, name tags, and workbooks will remain at Compass between classes so they are not forgotten at home). There is a $28.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.Topics in this series include: Discover Dogs (Quarter 1), Pocket Pets (Quarter 2), Reptile Roundup (Quarter 3) and Wildlife Rescue (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Shumway
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    A corn snake with cataracts, a lizard with a limp, or an iguana with an itch. Sometimes even our reptile friends need medical care! Lots of kids love animals, and some even think about becoming veterinarians and animal specialists. There is a lot of science in the care and keeping of animals.In this class, future veterinarians will learn all about the reptile species people keep as pets such as snakes, turtles, tortoises, skinks, and lizards such as geckos, bearded dragons, chameleons, and uromastyxs. Each of these different species has different needs in terms of diets, habitats, and handling. The class will discuss some general signs of illness or injury that someone might see in a pet reptile. Kids will discover some of fun and fascinating facts, similarities, and differences in species of reptiles. The class will make a broad survey of reptiles in the wild and discuss why those found outdoors should not be brought in as pets and why pet reptiles should not be released into the wild.Each class meeting will include hands-on and interactive demonstrations, simulations, role-playing, activities, games, stories, or short video clips to convey the information. During the first week, students will receive a lab coat and clinic name tag, and two model reptiles for demonstrations, and a class workbook. They will "adopt" and name their reptiles, and during the final week, they will receive a diploma. (Pets, lab coats, name tags, and workbooks will remain at Compass between classes so they are not forgotten at home). There is a $28.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Students must be minimum age 6 to enroll in this class (no age 5s).Topics in this series include: Discover Dogs (Quarter 1), Pocket Pets (Quarter 2), Reptile Roundup (Quarter 3) and Wildlife Rescue (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Black Rocket
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    What does it take to make a game? Art, music, storytelling, programming? All these things and more. Whether you are interested in game art, game design or coding, Unity is the place where it all comes together. Unity is a professional game development environment that has been used to create AAA games like Hearthstone and Kerbal Space Program and can also be used to create fun learning games, like ball rolling and pickup games. Unity games can be compiled for Mac, Windows, iOS, Android or Web GL, all from the same project file.Students will learn their way around the Unity development environment. They will learn to incorporate audio and art assets from the internet, as well as any original audio or art students have created. The class will use Unity's non-coding features to create action and will also do some scripting in C#. Students will create their own game, either chosen from Unity's catalog of beginner game tutorials or designed from scratch, and learn to deploy on the platform of their choice.Second semester will focus on 2D game design and will cover concepts like manipulating game objects in 2D space, working with "sprites" (2D game objects), and using the 2D camera setting. The class will learn techniques to create games like side-scrolling, top-down, platform and puzzle games. Even if you are most interested in 3D games, 2D development skills are useful for creating quick prototypes to show off your ideas.This course is for teens who are interested in either the artistic/graphic design aspect or programming aspect of video game development. Students should bring a laptop and charger to class each week. A gaming laptop with enhanced graphics card is preferred. No prior coding experience is expected. Topics in this Series: Video Game Designer: 3D (Semester 1) and Video Game Designer: 2D (Semester 2) Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be given in class and noted in the weekly e-mails.Assessments: Will not be given.What to Bring: A laptop and charger to class each week.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career Exploration, Technology, or Applied Computer Science for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Ethan Hay
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    Website design and development is a fun, tangible way to introduce teens to coding! Rather than writing code for the sake of memorizing syntax and symbols, students will be coding for themselves- to create their very own website! In this project-based class, students will design and develop a website on a topic of their choice. Will their personal website showcase a hobby, a club, a home business, or will it be used as their digital portfolio for future college applications?Students will learn to set up a website that follows industry standards and best practices. They will discover how HTML, CSS, and JavaSript are integrated as the core internet technologies that make a website useful, intuitive, and appealing. In the vast industry of website development, HTML serves as a website's framework, controlling content such as photos, videos, and text, while CSS is used for styling choices such as font styles, sizes, colors, and backgrounds. JavaScript is the dynamic language that controls not only functionality such as inputs, interface, and responses within websites, but is also used for app and game development. Students will have links to protected development sites where they can continue to work on their websites during the week, between classes.Prerequisites: Basic typing skillsWorkload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be given in class.Assessments: Will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: The class tuition includes a student technology fee that covers the use of classroom laptops and all software and licenses installed on the laptops.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Technology or Career Elective for purposes of a high school transcript.

    2
    Taliesin Knol
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    This semester continues where the Norman Conquests of the late 11th century left off, but focuses instead on the campaign of the Latin Europeans retake and then hold Jerusalem “for Christendom.” The Byzantine Empire had been suffering many setbacks in its wars against the Seljuk Turks in Anatolia, and centuries past had lost the holy city of Jerusalem, forcing European pilgrims to undertake a dangerous journey through hostile lands. Emperor Alexios had a difficult time raising new troops, especially after the disastrous battle of Manzikert in 1071, and little money to continue paying Latinkon, the Western (Latin speaking) mercenaries that were increasingly important core of the Byzantine army.

    To remedy this, Alexios asked Pope Urban II to send military aid in the spirit of Christian Cooperation and the protection of pilgrims to the Holy Land. What he got was not an elite, well organized, or loyal army on someone else’s budget, but a rabble ranging from elite, self- interested knights prone to in-fighting to an actual mob led by a strange hermit named Peter, and a shockingly large number of juveniles in the “children’s crusade.” It turns out the Pope was not actually that interested in cooperation, but saw a unified “holy army” as a means to make himself the most powerful man in Europe. He did not get what he wanted: powerful nobles who joined seeking fame and fortune abroad, some knights hoped to have their sins absolved, others simply wanted to fight, and tens of thousands of militarily useless peasants were simply along for the trip.

    The class will follow these Crusaders, with a myriad of motivations, but mostly with the goal of carving out personal fiefdoms in a strange new land or die trying.

    Students will examine in depth case studies and fit them together like an illuminated manuscript of history, learning how warfare, politics, law, and religion interplay to create the History of The World. These cases will be based on primary source documents of art and literature, which the class will use to create mock feudal systems, using the knowledge gained living in a medieval setting with their classmates in period appropriate collaborative and/or competitive settings.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Christina Somerville
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    Write to the Point is a comprehensive, middle school-level writing class that will prepare 7th and 8th grade students for high school level composition. The class will practice the fundamentals of composition through weekly writing assignments that encompass a variety of writing formats.Second Semester, students will learn to "stick to the point" in their writing. They will be challenged to identify their audience, define their purpose, and back-up their topic, thesis, or moral across multiple paragraph compositions. The class will continue to review writing basics such as grammar, agreement, and tense, and will learn tips for effective revision, editing, and feedback. Students will have the flexibility to select prompts and topics relevant to their own interests and will practice a variety of longer writing styles such as essays and short stories.Part of each in-class session will be dedicated to sharing and review of writing completed at home. Sometimes, students will be paired with classmates for peer review of grammar; other times, the class will collaborate through shared GoogleDocs for review and feedback of others' writing. Students should bring a laptop and charging cord to class each week for accessing in-progress assignments. This is a 15-week class that will have one week break in the 16-week Compass calendar. The week off will be announced. Topics in this series include: Paragraphs & Articles (Semester 1) and Essays & Short Stories (Semester 2).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Shannon McClain
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    Writers @ Work is a fundamental writing class that will prepare seventh and eighth grade students for high school level composition. The class will progress from getting started on learning how to effectively structure purposeful paragraphs) (first semester) to multiple paragraphs linked into articulate and organized essays (second semester).Second semester will focus on essay writing by combining several paragraphs to form a paper. Essays will cover persuasive, personal, and formal themes. Students will learn about topic sentences, transitions between paragraphs, clarity, and guiding the reader through their discussion. Writers will learn about organizing their thoughts or evidence and selecting the most important points to craft a multi-paragraph composition. Students have freedom to choose topics for each form. They will be encouraged to first write about something they already know about and then write about a new topic where they will be challenged to define the question they want to investigate, find sources for their research, organize details, and document information used.Grammar concepts will be introduced throughout the year, and students will be encouraged to incorporate the technique in their next writing or revision. Grammar concepts will include a "toolbox" of writing techniques and rules such as sentence structure, complex and compound sentences, independent and dependent clauses, parts of speech, agreement, tense, use of dialogue and quotation marks, and correct use of punctuation. Students will also be taught techniques for brainstorming and outlining before beginning to write and will be given tips on choosing creative, interesting, and powerful words over mundane, vague, and over-used words.In both semesters, there will be an emphasis on revision. Writing is seldom just the way the author hopes in the first draft. At times, students will be encouraged to use the same paragraph for several weeks to build-upon their first draft, incorporate feedback, apply writing and grammar techniques, in order for them to see the benefits of revision. They will learn to read their own writing from a reader's perspective and develop strategies for improving it. Students will give and receive feedback from class peers and receive regular feedback from the instructor. Time will be set aside in most classes for dedicated, in-class writing (8-10 minutes.) This is a 15-weel class that will not meet on March 30.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Karen Hickman
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    In Writers' Workshop, middle school students will expand essential communication skills- reading, retaining, discussing, composing, revising, and even listening and speaking- by reviewing short selections of renowned literature and putting pen to paper! Each quarter, students will write about a popular theme using the elements they observe in the example classics.A massive stone castle. A dark swampy moat. A victorious knight in his gleaming armor! Students are curious about life in a castle. The class will time time-travel to the Middle Ages through classical texts and poetry. Research is an essential skill for writers (and students). Students will uncover information about life in the Middle Ages as they learn the skills of notetaking and documenting resources. They will learn how to organize and present information from another era with discovery drafts, gathering grids, and finally, refining their report based on primary sources. Students will learn how to compile a bibliography and will wrap-up their research report with a short presentation at the last class. Join the fun as we learn about life in a castle!Imagination and creativity come easily to most young writers, but acquiring technical skills is also important. Each quarter, students will focus on specific skills. The skills are a part of the Writer's Tool Kit that includes: understanding parts and kinds of sentences, plurals, possessives, and punctuation. Across the four quarters of this class, students will also learn how to use a dictionary and a thesaurus, as well as higher-level, middle school level skills such as summarizing, outlining, note taking, writing a book report, or citing sources. In class, students will share drafts and in-progress works to receive peer feedback and promote revising and editing skills. Homework: Students are expected to write in a journal for a minimum of four minutes per day and respond to prompts that are sent home on an assignment bookmark. They will also be asked to read short assignments such as a chapter or excerpt in preparation for class discussions. Topics in this Series: Creating Colorful Characters (Quarter 1), Fantasy Fun (Quarter 2), Learn to Research- Life in a Castle (Quarter 3) and Prose, Poetry, & Paintings- A Passport Adventure (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Shannon McClain
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    Scriptophobia. Break the block. Get past the paralysis. Every student struggles with writing at some point. Fearful writers worry what others will think. Reluctant writers have trouble getting started. Even strong, prolific writers experience roadblocks in their writing. Every teen can benefit from Writing Lab, a safe, supportive writing workshop where an experienced writing coach facilitates peer revision groups. Writing Lab is based on the idea of revision, revision, revision; teaching teens that writing does not have to be perfect; sometimes they just need to put words on paper to get started.Writing Lab will give students the opportunity to revise their own writing at their own pace. Writing Lab may be taken stand-alone or to complement other classes. Each class will include the opportunity to write to a prompt or on a topic of choice, to confer with classmates about writing, and to work on developing pieces. Each session will include dedicated writing time. Students may bring pieces of writing from another class or something they are working on at home-- history paper, English composition, lab report, short story, personal essay, etc. No two will be the same. If a student shows up with no in-progress writing, the instructor will provide sample prompts to get the writing process started. After writing, students will break up into groups of 3-4 students to share their work and receive feedback from peers. Writers will benefit from having an audience and receiving input on their drafts. That feedback will inspire further revision, refinement, and clarification of their writing as well as ideas for new pieces. Each week the writing coach will provide writing tips and guidance on everything from organizing big ideas and writing mechanics to how to give and receive constructive criticism.Revision is a vital step in the writing process in which writers consider what they have accomplished and what they can do to make their work more effective. Having the opportunity to revise is helpful to reluctant writers, who learn to free themselves of high expectations of every word they put to paper, as well as prolific writers, who benefit from honing their craft. Having models written by peers in addition to a peer audience is inspiring, and it trains writers to be critical readers who can give constructive feedback. Students will improve as writers if they choose to work on their pieces in class only, but working independently will significantly amplify the benefits of the class. Topics in this Series: Writing Lab will continue in Semester 2, and students may continue the course to further develop/improve their writing. Continuing students from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend time outside of class writing, however the time will vary based on the type of writing and students' goals for the writing.Assignments: Students should bring works-in-progress to lab. The number of assignments completed or advanced will depend on the amount of outside writing a student does and the length of his/her piece.Assessments: The writing coach will provide individual feedback on pieces that a student brings to work on in lab.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Shannon McClain

    Writing is one of the most essential communication skills, and it gives kids a voice! In this class, upper elementary-aged students will learn the FUN-damentals of Writing Well! Kids will learn the foundations of good writing, step-by-step, in manageable, weekly pieces. Students will start the year with learning to formulate strong sentences and eventually move to organized, cohesive paragraphs in this class series. Classes will consist of lessons on writing basics, reading great examples (and weak ones) from literature and publications, and in-class writing practice. The emphasis will be on varying sentence structures, word choice, and correct structure- all with fun, creative topics that will keep kids interested in writing!During quarter 3, the class will exercise their paragraph-writing skills in writing about fictional scenarios and brief stories. Students will take the skills of writing topic sentences, supporting sentences, and the clincher and weave in elements of story writing such as characters, setting, and situation. Fiction writing builds confidence as it is sun for students to fill in supporting details such as creative names, colorful adjectives, captivating adjectives, and concise verbs in order to tell their story. The class will learn to define what they want to convey in a paragraph and how to guide the reader through the points of their paragraph. By the end of quarter two, students will be able to write clear, cohesive and well-organized body paragraphs.The goal for this course is for students to increase their writing fluency, gain confidence, and strengthen their abilities to write clear, cohesive, and grammatically correct sentences and paragraphs. The group will learn the stages of writing--prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing--and various approaches to each stage. Throughout the quarter, mini-lessons on vocabulary and grammar will be presented on topics such as correct capitalization, agreement, tenses, parts of speech, synonyms, etc. Each week, students will have brief homework assignments based on what was covered in class using creative and non-fiction free response prompts to practice techniques at home. Regular writing practice improves fluency and comfort level. Students should expect 45-60 minutes of writing at home throughout the week (3-4 days at 15 minutes per sitting.)Topics in this series include Sentences that Speak (Quarter 1), Planning Paragraphs (Quarter 2), Fascinating Fiction Paragraphs (Quarter 3), and Fun Factual Paragraphs (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judith Harmon

    Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. What happens when sly sleuths and devious detectives team up to thwart threatening thieves?Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other, then read through the two, prepared scripts together. Through group activities and guided discussion, they will create new characters, brainstorm variations, craft plot changes, add lines, and cast their parts. The instructor will then update and customize the class script with the students' input.The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.Topics in this Series: Medieval Mayhem (Quarter 1), Wacky Wednesday (Quarter 2), Detective Drama (Quarter 3), Kooky Cooking Contest (Quarter 4)

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judith Harmon

    Kids take to the stage as they collaboratively write and perform their very own play with unique characters and an original storyline. What happens when favorite fairy tales are flipped and fumbled? In the newly fabricated tale, does the fearless frog save the fair princess, or do Red Riding Hood and the wretched wolf reunite?Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other, then read through the two, prepared scripts together. Through group activities and guided discussion, they will create new characters, brainstorm variations, craft plot changes, add lines, and cast their parts. The instructor will then update and customize the class script with the students' input.The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity. Note: Students who are emerging readers (not able to read at a 3rd/4th grade level) would be better suited to the Young Actor's Playhouse class, rather than this level.Topics in this Series: Camping Catastrophe (Quarter 1), Mystery after Midnight (Quarter 2), Fractured Fairy Tales (Quarter 3), Upside-Down Universe (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Jeff Virchow

    Social dancing does not have to be slow or stuffy! There is energy in the ballroom with Action Dance! Students will learn the beginning Swing Dancing, which originated in Harlem and is known for its spirited stepping and spinning to jazz and big band music. The class will examine the evolution of East Coast swing and its offshoots along with some West Coast swing, Lindy Hop, the Charleston, and the DC native Hand Dance. They will also learn Shag dancing with similar steps done to beach music. Emphasis in the class will be on having fun and learning techniques to help dancers be comfortable and relaxed. Social dances encourage confidence, social presence, posture, and poise in teens. Social dancing is partner-based dance; consider signing up with a friend! Please note that in order to demonstrate some steps and forms, students may occasionally be invited to partner with their instructor. Topics in this Series: Action Dance: Caribbean & Latin (Semester 1), Action Dance: Swing & Shag (Semester 2), etc. Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester. Prerequisites: None Assessments: Informal feedback will be given in class. Formal assessments or grades will not be given. What to Wear: Students should wear loose, comfortable clothing. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Becca Sticha

    Did you know that our Sun is a yellow dwarf star residing in a spiral galaxy, the Milky Way? Our nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, a red dwarf star, is a mere 25 trillion miles away...but in our same galaxy! Kids who love astronomy and other sciences are invited to learn about stars, galaxies, and the cosmos in this beginning astronomy class.Join us as we examine the lifecycle of stars and discuss what stars are made of. The class will learn how we observe the universe (telescopes, particle detectors, etc) and make these "astronomical" measurements of time and distance. And finally, the class will examine the phenomenon of black holes. This class will use some NASA projects for educators in their investigation. Future themes in this series include: Inner Solar System (Quarter 1); Outer Solar System (Quarter 2); Stars, Galaxies, and the Cosmos (Quarter 3); and Exoplanets and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    The Science Place

    More than 70% of the Earth's surface is water! Understanding the earth s oceans and freshwater systems is critical to understanding life on our planet- from beginnings in the seas to the water cycle that supports ongoing life. The study of aquatic and marine biology provides a basis for understanding much of the chemistry, physics, biology, and meteorology on our planet. Budding marine biologists will travel inland to learn about freshwater systems like lakes and ponds, rivers and streams before returning to the coast to study marshes and estuaries followed by extreme marine environments- all under the guidance of an experienced marine biologist. The focus will be on hands-on, dynamic learning, and students will engage in several demonstrations and experiments in each class.During Quarter 3, students will focus on the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of estuarine systems. We will learn about salinity gradients, nutrient cycling, and biological communities in temperate estuaries and tropical mangrove swamps. Students will study the amazing adaptations that allow plants and animals in these habitats to tolerate rapid changes in temperature and salinity. We ll also discuss human impacts to estuarine habitats, including habitat loss, water diversion, and eutrophication. Topics in this Series: Lakes & Ponds (Quarter 1); Roparian Biomes- Rivers and Streams (Quarter 2); Marshes and Estuaries, Where the River Meets the Sea (Quarter 3); and Extreme Marine (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Kerry Diederich

    Elementary artists can get in on the action as they learn about a different artist or artistic style each week and create a representative piece using a wide range of artistic supplies such as tempura and water color paints, pastels, pencils, cray pas, oil pastel crayons, specialty papers, sculpting media, and embellishments.Third quarter, students will look to Washington, DC at famous murals, monuments, and museums. Class projects will be multi-media creations influenced and inspired by the art and sculpture we view in the Capitol-area such as the Washington Monument, Natural Gallery of Art, National Cathedral, US Capitol and National Mall. Topics in this Series: Media of the Masters (Quarter 1); Animal Artists (Quarter 2); Murals, Monuments, and Museums (Quarter 3); Stellar Celestial Subjects (Quarter 4). Supply Fee: There is a supply fee of $20.00, payable to the instructor on the first day of class which covers consumable class materials such a specialty papers, watercolor pencils, and paints.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Taliesin Knol

    Dragged into World War II relatively unprepared, the American army ballooned in size while having to learn how to fight a modern war with tanks and airplanes all while overseas. To split the German army's attention from the beleaguered Soviets, the Allies needed to open a second front of the war. Not yet ready to attack Fortress Europe, the Americans started off small by aiding the British against the combined Italian and German armies in North Africa. The campaign was difficult but served as the proving ground which produced as battle-hardened American soldiers, ready to take the war to Europe.Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, trenches, rivers, ridges, vegetation, barbed wire, etc.) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical wargaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: WWI Naval Conflict- Jutland (Quarter 1). WWI- The 100 Day's Offensive and the end of Germany (Quarter 2), WWII- Operation Torch, Invasion of North Africa (Quarter 3), and Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWII Naval Conflict- The Philippine Sea (Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Taliesin Knol

    Dragged into World War II relatively unprepared, the American army ballooned in size while having to learn how to fight a modern war with tanks and airplanes all while overseas. To split the German army's attention from the beleaguered Soviets, the Allies needed to open a second front of the war. Not yet ready to attack Fortress Europe, the Americans started off small by aiding the British against the combined Italian and German armies in North Africa. The campaign was difficult but served as the proving ground which produced as battle-hardened American soldiers, ready to take the war to Europe.Using artistic model-making techniques, hand tools, and historical maps, students will each form a 10" X 14" shaped, foam diorama with landscape elements (hills, trenches, rivers, ridges, vegetation, barbed wire, etc.) to represent a scene of a famous historical engagement. Students will each receive 1:72 scale miniature soldiers to populate their scene. Once individual projects are constructed, students will combine their dioramas alongside those of their classmates to approximate the larger battlefield terrain. Students will spend the remainder of the quarter learning about the tactics and outcomes of the military engagement while playing a table-top strategy game. Student strategists will use a simplified version of the Fire and Fury historical wargaming rule system for moving troops and equipment. Along with their classmates, students will see how this battle progressed and test different outcome scenarios that might have occurred with different battlefield choices.The instructor will use maps and visual presentations to explain the historical background and circumstances leading up to the specific battle. Course documents, such as period maps, game rules and all other instructional media will be available via a Google Drive link which will be emailed to parents. Topics in this series include: WWI Naval Conflict- Jutland (Quarter 1). WWI- The 100 Day's Offensive and the end of Germany (Quarter 2), WWII- Operation Torch, Invasion of North Africa (Quarter 3), and Battle Strategies & Dioramas: WWII Naval Conflict- The Philippine Sea (Quarter 4). There is a $25.00 materials fee payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Becca Sticha

    Discover the world of robotics using kids' favorite, interlocking building bricks! Students will build and program 3-4 different whimsical, mechanized projects each quarter using the WeDo 2.0 robotics system by LEGO Education.Third quarter, students will build, program, and model perfect pets such as a Tom & Jerry (cat and mouse), a baby bird, a bunny, and a dog.Their robots will be built using special-shaped LEGO components from the WeDo Educational set, motors, motion sensors, tilt sensors and a programmable, Bluetooth control unit ("brain"). Student will use classroom tablets to program the control units using an intuitive drag-and-drop coding modules.Prior experience with LEGO or coding is not required. All equipment is furnished. Topics in this Series: Under the Sea (Quarter 1), Wings and Things (Quarter 2); Perfect Pets (Quarter 3), and Reptiles Rule (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Dr. Michele Forsythe

    Kids are naturally curious about chemistry! Chemistry explains the properties, behaviors, and interactions of materials around us: things we eat, drink, clean with, wear, drive, and even play with. Kids can use chemistry to understand how things taste, smell, mix, melt, combust, feel, and whether they are recyclable or rubbish, helpful or harmful, nutritious or not. Chemistry is key to understanding the world around us, including other areas of science. In this class, kids begin to use scientific words to describe their observations and will become familiar with some science apparatus.Third quarter, kids will discover chemistry at home in products they use every day from glue sticks to glow sticks and soaps to shampoos. Find out what is in toothpaste and how it cleans your teeth. Test detergents to see what stains are removed and uncover the chemistry of how they work. Play with the properties of plastics, adhesives, and lubricants and try making your own. Students will examine the properties of paints, dyes and inks through chromatography.Topics in this series include: Chemistry in the Kitchen (Quarter 1), Chemistry in Action (Quarter 2), Chemistry at Home (Quarter 3), and Chemistry of Toys (Quarter 4)Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Wyndy Frederick

    In the style of “High School Musical” or a glee club, Compass Chorale is for tween singers who want to have fun taking their vocal performance to the next level. This semester-long program will focus on choral arrangements of contemporary pieces with 2- and 3- part harmonies. Singers will be expected to memorize pieces and will be required to participate in the semester performance (December 20).This program includes instruction on vocal development and performance such as posture, breathing, intonation, and the principles of blending vocal harmonies. Basic musical notation will be introduced as well as melodic and harmonic intervals.Compass Chorale is for students who took Learn to Sing class(es) at Compass, those who have other musical theater experience. First time new singers and younger students who have choral experience must receive instructor approval to enroll. Students are encouraged to enroll early because the number, ages, experience, and vocal parts of the students will determine which songs selected. There is a $25.00 fee for a music notebook due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    0
    Mimi Nyman

    Students will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Winter Warm-Up recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Mimi Nyman

    Students will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Winter Warm-Up recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Mimi Nyman

    Students will enjoy making hearty favorites and winter weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Winter Warm-Up recipes are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include:

    • Caprese tarts
    • Loaded Baked Potato Soup
    • Spinach Pear Salad
    • Cauliflower Bake
    • Stuffed Peppers
    • Spinach with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
    • Mexican Inspired Casserole
    • Lemon Cake
    Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week.Notes: Students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flair (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $45.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: None- Disposable aprons and take-home containers provided. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and have long hair tied back, braided, or secured under a bandana (male and female).For more information and FAQs, see the Compass Cooking Classes webpage.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Dr. Anne Taranto

    In this bridge high school English workshop, students be introduced to the concepts of literary genres and analytical writing. Each quarter, the class will examine one select work or genre. Students will learn to recognize figurative language, tone, subtext and diction, identify symbolism and imagery, and develop an awareness of narrative perspective and of the social-historical contexts in which these works were created. Third quarter will feature The Play: Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare).Composition: Students will also learn the fundamental components of academic writing, including how to construct a thesis statement that makes an argument, how to support their ideas effectively with textual evidence, how to organize an argument logically, and how to cite sources in MLA format. Some class periods will be dedicated Writing Lab session in which students write in-class in order to get on-the-spot support and feedback from the teacher. Students should bring laptops to these class sessions.Topics in this Series: The Novel (Quarter 1),  Poetry (Quarter 2), The Play (Quarter 3), and Short Fiction (Quarter 4). Students who continue from one quarter to the next will receive priority registration.Prerequisites: Students should be able to read at grade level, and it is recommended that students have had a middle school writing class.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: All assignments will be posted in a Google Classroom management site. Students will need their own gmail accounts to access Google Classroom.Assessments: Students' written assignments will be graded using a rubric and assigned points that the homeschool parent can use when assigning an overall class grade.Textbook/Materials: Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased and bundled for students. (See Supply Fee below).Supply Fee: A class fee of $9.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the select novel.What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking passages/pages.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component, or partial credit, in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    0
    Karen Shumway

    Tween builders will use a LEGO construction components in this hands-on engineering class. Each week, students will build a different project from the LEGO Education 9686 curriculum which will introduce concepts in simple machines, mechanical engineering, or structural engineering. Using the engineering design process, students will build a basic mechanism, test it, gather data, and then modify their design to improve performance. Students will gain experience in taking measurements such as distance traveled, using the stopwatch, and recording their findings on paper. This approach introduces applied physics concepts in a subtle way, encouraging observation of physical phenomena such as forces and relationships without being bogged down by equations. Students will work with ordinary LEGO bricks, beams, and plates along with specialized components such as gears, toothed elements, wheels and axles, pulleys, and motors. Second semester projects will build on simple machines, making increasingly complex mechanisms, adding motors for projects such as a clock, car with fly wheel, and fan. Topics in this series include Simple Machines & Structures (Semester 1) and Powered Machines & Mechanisms (Semester 2). There is a $50.00 supply and equipment fee due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judith Harmon
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    Fashion designers have long borrowed design elements from characters and costumes of their favorite films when creating collections, some more directly than others. Fashion designers often look to various forms of fiction and  fantasy for inspiration. In this fashion masterclass, students will examine the fashion featured in film, television, live theater, and visual arts. What inspired these looks? Did they make it to the runway or mass markets?Fashion trends traced to the silver screen range from slouchy legwarmers from "Flash Dance" and bomber jackets from "Top Gun" to full black leather looks from the "Matrix". The movie "Grease" brought 50s fashion back decades later. "Clueless" made preppy cute, and "Frozen" encouraged girls to try side braids. Designers of wedding gowns have taken inspiration from Disney princesses for decades.Students will learn about fashion forecasting-- the art of selecting styles and colors several seasons in advance-- and will make their own predictions on the future of fashion of what might be coming to runways and retail based on what is trends the see originating in media.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Fencing Sports Academy

    Fencing is the clashing of steel and competitive spirit combined with the battle of the wits. Apply the rules of Olympic fencing, and you have a physically and mentally challenging game of strategy, often called, "physical chess." In Beginning Fencing, students will learn the rules of the sport as well as footwork, attacks, parries, responses, and how to judge matches. Beginning students will use the epee, a thin, lightweight sword with broad hand guard and will wear a wireless electronic scoring sensor over layers of protective gear. Returning students will work with both the epee and foil. The physical benefits of fencing are an increase in agility, balance and coordination. Fencing also provides mental benefits such as improved focus, strategy and confidence. Fencing is safety-oriented with blunt tip weapons, chest protectors, chest/sleeve pads, fencing jacket, gloves, and face mask. Students may enroll any quarter. All equipment is provided by the instructor. Students are asked to wear comfortable athletic pants such as running pants or sweatpants (no jeans, no dresses), and low-heeled athletic shoes.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Fencing Sports Academy

    Fencing is the clashing of steel and competitive spirit combined with the battle of the wits. Apply the rules of Olympic fencing, and you have a physically and mentally challenging game of strategy, often called, "physical chess." In Beginning Fencing, students will learn the rules of the sport as well as footwork, attacks, parries, responses, and how to judge matches. Beginning students will use the epee, a thin, lightweight sword with broad hand guard and will wear a wireless electronic scoring sensor over layers of protective gear. Returning students will work with both the epee and foil. The physical benefits of fencing are an increase in agility, balance and coordination. Fencing also provides mental benefits such as improved focus, strategy and confidence. Fencing is safety-oriented with blunt tip weapons, chest protectors, chest/sleeve pads, fencing jacket, gloves, and face mask. Students may enroll any quarter. All equipment is provided by the instructor. Students are asked to wear comfortable athletic pants such as running pants or sweatpants (no jeans, no dresses), and low-heeled athletic shoes.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Iman Castaneda

    FUNctional Fitness is a dynamic kids' PE program that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get kids up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. FUNctional Fitness focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis is on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of FUNctional Fitness will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness. All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes. FUNctional Fitness continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve fitness. No two workouts are the same! Students must be minimum age 7 to take this class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Iman Castaneda

    FUNctional Fitness is a dynamic kids' PE program that incorporates well-rounded exercises to get kids up and moving mid-day! No two workouts are the same, but each day's activities incorporate exercises that target 10 areas: cardio-vascular endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. FUNctional Fitness focuses on functional movements that are fundamental to all aspects of play and exercise- pulling, pushing, running, throwing, climbing, lifting, and jumping. Work-outs are scalable and adaptable to different individual's own level, and the emphasis is on fun, safety, and personal accomplishment rather than competition among classmates. When the weather permits, some exercises may be taken outdoors. The physical challenges of FUNctional Fitness will foster self-confidence, focus, and help instill a foundation for a lifetime of fitness. All equipment is furnished. Students are asked to wear loose, comfortable clothing, such as running pants or sweatpants, and comfortable, supportive athletic shoes. FUNctional Fitness continues each quarter, and students may repeat the class to continue to improve fitness. No two workouts are the same! Students must be minimum age 7 to take this class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Christina Somerville

    Great Books for Girls is a facilitated book club just for preteen girls. Girls will read high-quality, age-appropriate literature and expand their understanding of what they read through book discussion and hands-on extension activities. Girls will be encouraged to interact with the story and each other through activities such as acting out or illustrating favorite scenes, discussing and writing alternate endings, prequels, origin or spinoff stories, or researching specific aspects of the story. Through guided class discussion, the group will be exposed to beginning literary analysis in a fun, interactive setting by discussing plot, theme, characters, setting, genre, writing style, and artistry using specific examples from the story. They will learn to analyze characters, their actions and motives, respond to hypothetical questions, make predictions, and answer prompts using examples from the book.Each quarter, the class will read one book that is teacher's choice and a second book that the students select as a group. Students must read assigned chapters from their books at home, either as individual silent reading, read-aloud with parents' support, or listening to an audiobook edition. Readers will be encouraged to take notes on key passages or questions. All books are selected from among Newbery Medalists and Honor Books, Caldecott Medal books, and proven classics of children's fiction. This year's selected themes and teacher's choice books include: Quarter 1- Growth: Catherine, Called Birdy (Karen Cushman); Quarter 2- Imagination: Anne of Green Gables (L.M. Montgomery); Quarter 3- Independence: "Dealing with Dragons: The Enchanted Forest Chronicles (Book 1) by Patricia C. Wrede; Quarter 4- The Night Diary (Veela Hiranandani).Because students will need clean, inexpensive copies of each novel to mark in, and because they must be able to refer to the passages on the same page numbers, copies of mass market paperbacks will be pre-purchased so students can be "on the same page" (literally). Parents will be given 2-3 weeks notice to purchase the second novel of the quarter.Supply Fee: A class fee of $9.30 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for the first novel.What to Bring: Students should bring the current novel, paper, pen or pencil and highlighter to class each week. Some students may wish to bring paper clips, adhesive flags or post-it notes for marking pages. This is a 7-week class that will have one week break in the 8-week quarter. The week off will be announced.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Ney Mello
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    Teens will continue to learn the fundamentals of playing the guitar. In this class, students will continue to learn basic melodies, chords, and strumming patterns for familiar songs from a variety of genres such as, "Sweet Jane" (by The Velvet Underground), "House of the Rising Sun," (by Eric Burdon and The Animals) and "Willow" (by Taylor Swift) chosen by the instructor and students. Students are encouraged to bring in music they are interested in learning. New chords and new songs will be added each week as students also learn to read music and basic music theory. Students will also learn how to hold, tune, and care for their guitars. Each student will need a least a beginner level acoustic guitar. Students should be able to read at grade level for this class and should plan to practice at home several times each week. Adults are permitted to enroll in this class.Prerequisite: New students who wish to enroll 2nd semester should have at least 12-15 hours of prior instruction in order to match the pace of the enrolled students. Topics in this Series: Guitar for Teen Beginners I (Semester 1), Guitar for Teen Beginners II (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Workload: Students should expect to spend 20-30 minutes per day, most days practicing chords and melodies from class.Assignments: New material will be introduced in class.Assessments: Will not be given.Lab/Supply Fee: If the student needs a new or replacement tablature notebook, there is a materials fee of $8.00 payable to the Compass .What to Bring: Students should purchase or rent an acoustic guitar. In addition, picks, an electric tuner or tuner app installed on a phone, and pen/pencil.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: Guitar for Teen Beginners I, or equivalent

    2
    Sarah Reynolds

    Krav Maga is the Israeli martial art which teaches self defense and fitness. Students of Krav Maga are taught a series of strategies to assess and respond to common situations, such as facing a bully. Kids are always taught first and foremost to get away, to get help, and to try to deescalate the situation. When that fails, students practice a technique that includes a warning strike followed by escape, and finally, they learn how to stand up for themselves and how to counterattack if a situation escalates and becomes threatening. Kids are empowered and gain confidence when they rehearse how to handle real-life situations. Exercises and in-class practice incorporate balance, coordination, energy, and other key elements of fitness along with life skills such as confidence, teamwork, respect, discipline, and respect.Students may enroll in Krav Maga at any time, and everyone will begin as a white belt. Each quarter, students will practice the full range of skills, but there will be two "featured" moves that a student can earn a belt stripe for being able to demonstrate. Featured moves will include a combative strike and a defensive escape technique. No one stripe is a prerequisite for any other color, and color stripes can be earned in any order.Third quarter, students will have the chance to earn a Brown Stripe. Featured moves include: cover defense and wrist locks (red stripe); straight punch defense and bear hugs (orange stripe); head movement defense and front 2-handed choke (yellow stripe); round kick defense and back 2-handed choke (green stripe); front kick defense and guillotine choke (blue stripe); clinch defense and rear choke (purple stripe); ground striking defense and head lock defense (brown stripe); and 360 defense and full Nelson (black stripe).Students will be able to test for belt promotions to move through the ranks of white belt, yellow belt, orange belt, etc. On average, it is estimated that a student will be ready for a belt test after four quarters/four color stripes. Belt testing will be by coach approval. Topics in this Series: Blue Stripe (1st Quarter), Purple Stripe (2nd Quarter), Brown Stripe (3rd Quarter) and Black Stripe (4th Quarter). Assessments: Belt testing for promotion will be by coach recommendation, but on average will take 4 quarters. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $10.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for the t-shirt and white belt (new students) or $5.00 for the white belt (returning students). A belt test fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor when a student is ready to test for promotion. What to Bring: Refillable water bottle. What to Wear: In lieu of a full martial arts uniform, participants should wear their class t-shirt and belt along with shorts, leggings, or loose, comfortable athletic pants, and comfortable athletic shoes or sneakers.Non-Meeting Days: None

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Wyndy Frederick

    Everyone can learn to sing! This class features vocal selections from the best of Broadway that were meant for children to sing such as, "I Just Can't Wait to Be King" (The Lion King), "It's the Hard-Knock Life" (Annie) or "Do-Re-Mi"and "My Favorite Things" from Sound of Music. Other possible selections come from a wide variety of Broadway's favorites like Mary Poppins, Peter Pan, Les Miserables, and Oliver!The quarter's repertoire will include at least one group choral number. Students will work on other music as solos, duets, or small group numbers. This introduction to vocal development and performance includes posture, breathing, intonation, and the principles of blending vocal harmonies. Basic musical notation will be introduced as well as melodic and harmonic intervals. No previous musical experience is required- just the joy of singing! Prior to the start of class, the instructor will identify song book(s) and accompaniments for students to purchase. Topics in this Series: Best of Disney (Quarter 1); Holidays Around the World (Quarter 2); Broadway Bound (Quarter 3); and TBD (Quarter 4). Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to Compass on the first day of class for a song notebook.

    0
    Kathy Preisinger

    Music Makers explores many facets of the musical experience- singing, moving, dancing, listening, and playing instruments. The class will explore musical stories, famous composers, and different genres of music while playing a variety of percussion instruments (drums, sticks, triangles, woodblocks and more!). Students will learn to play a beginning pitched instrument on glockenspiels (a small barred instrument like the xylophone). Using an Orff-based approach, students will learn to read and write beginning musical notation and learn musical terminology all in the context of fun and play. Music Makers classes provide a fun, pressure-free environment to experience music and movement with the goal of general musicianship and excellent preparation for further, individual instrument lessons if desired. Music Makers helps every child acquire the essential building blocks for a future of musical learning! Students may join Music Makers at any quarter, and they may return again and again since new music, themes, and skills are constantly introduced.

    0
    Judith Harmon

    Who doesn't love a good "Whodunnit" mystery? In this workshop, teens actors will work together to bring a cast of characters to life through creative adaptations and interpretive improvisation. Using materials from a commercial murder mystery role playing game (RPG), students will assume the personas of outrageous and offbeat characters. As the drama unfolds in rounds guided by clue cards, eclectic evidence, and fictitious forensics, a victim, a motive, and eventually the murderer will be revealed.Student actors will be guided through the development of a strong, compelling character, complete with unique ways of speaking, gesturing, and moving, an original costume, a backstory, and of course, an alibi.Hanna and Harry Heart are the envied high school sweethearts turned perfect couple in the town of Amorville. The Hearts prepare to host the traditional Valentine's Day event at Mio Amore Cafe. Old friends are eager to catch up, but have been plagued with scandal, deceit, and contempt. The Hearts hoped everyone could put their differences aside for a celebration without chaos and misfortune, but alas, a guest was murdered at the event. Who could have done it?In this workshop, students benefit from experimenting with acting and improvisation and working as a team. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and enjoy working in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. Topics in this Series: Murder at Toadwart Inn (Quarter 1), The Greatest Murder on Earth (Quarter 2), Til Death Do We Part (Quarter 3), Murder & Mayhem at the Old Doom Mansion (Quarter 4), etc. Students continuing from the prior quarter will receive priority pre-registration for next quarter.Workload: Students should expect to spend 1-1.5 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be posted in a Google classroom.Assessments: Informal qualitative feedback will be given in class throughout the semester. A quantitative score/grade will not be provided.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $25.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for a script and costs related to props and performance license fee.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in fine arts or performing arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Anne Sharp
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    The PenPoint writing board is a home for students who love to write, who love to read writing, and who love to share writing with others. Writing is often a solitary act, but writers also need a community in which to grow. Mirroring the design of famous writing salons/groups like The Bloomsbury Group, The Algonquin Round Table, and The Inklings, this course fosters a Compass community that will encourage individual writers, promote literary collaboration and provide challenging feedback to boost creativity and artistic development.Second semester will focus on editing and publishing. Students in this course will select writings from their portfolios and prepare them to submit to contests, anthologies and publications beyond our Compass campus. While continuing to draft and explore their own personal writing, students will assume editorial roles in the production of Pen Point, a beyond-our-classroom anthology. As editors, students will design and build an anthology, advertise the publication, solicit manuscripts and artwork, develop selection criteria, review/select/edit material, and learn the principles of layout and design. Embedded in this process are real-world experiences, and students will improve their communication and organization skills through goal-setting, time management, meeting deadlines, emailing, confirmations, proofreading, etc. There is a $20.00 supply fee due payable to the instructor on the first day to cover publishing costs of the printed literary magazine anthology.Note:This is an online class with some meetings in a virtual classroom providing live, synchronous collaboration. Topics in this Series: Creative Writing (Semester 1) and Publsihing (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: Advanced reading, writing, and analytical skills.Workload: Students should expect to spend 2-3 hours per week outside of class on investigation, writing, or editing for this class. Assignments: Writing and editing assignments will be delegated by the student board. Assessments: In lieu of a teacher-provided assessments, writers will receive peer feedback on their own work, and the finished product will be a printed anthology for their portfolio.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class for publishing expensesWhat to Bring: Students should bring laptops to class to work collaboratively and real-time on shared documents and the class portal.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English for purposes of a high school transcript.

    Prerequisites: None

    2
    Dr. Michele Forsythe

    Every parent knows that kids are curious, captivated, and quick to learn technology-based products. Programming Projects builds on that curiosity to introduce computer science basics, problem-solving, and computational thinking through play-based learning.Third quarter, students will work with Sphero Mini Robot Balls which are spherical, bluetooth enabled robots encased in a clear jacket. Think of BB-8 in Star Wars! Students can code these robots using "drawing" (literally dragging their finger on a computer screen) or block coding with Scratch. Students will work in teams to direct Sphero Mini Robots through mazes and obstacle courses, make them talk, and race them. Inside the Robot ball, there is a gyroscope, accelerometer, and colorful LED lights that are manipulated through simple coding. Once students have mastered programming through drawing on screen, they will learn to control the Robot ball through simple programming in the Sphero Play app or the Sphero Edu app on a phone or tablet. All equipment and devices will be provided by the instructor. Learn more about the Sphero Mini Robot Ball here. https://youtu.be/YxlLeiVo3gMTopics in this series include: Sphero indi Robotic Cars (Quarter 1), Scratch Coding (Quarter 2), Sphero Robotic Ball Quarter 3) and Tinkercad Design (Quarter 4) Lab/Supply Fee: A lab fee of $20.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Becca Sticha

    Student engineers will be challenged to design, build, and program a robot to explore a simulated Martian challenge. Each rover will have to fit in a mock Mars lander and be able to drive out the lander door, down a ramp, and onto the Mars surface. Once in the Compass Mars environment, each lander must be able to maintain a course while driving over a bumpy terrain and pick up and collect red rocks while ignoring Martian rocks of other colors.Student engineers will be challenged to design, build, and program a robot to complete several unique mazes in the fastest possible time. Students will learn to program their robots to make "decisions" when exploring an unfamiliar maze such as "go straight until you encounter a wall" and "turn to the right if you run into an obstacle."Students will use the LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 robotics sets. They will build with motors, wheels/axles, gears, levers, and special components. Students will have to install touch, sound, color, gyro, ultrasonic, and/or infrared sensors while also learning to program sequences and commands that use input/output devices for controlled movements and precise turns. Using the drag-and-drop EV3 programming menu, students will learn to program their robots while experimenting with key concepts such as fixed values, variables, loops, and logic constructs.This course integrates science, engineering and computational thinking while introducing physical constraints, units of measurement, and coordinate systems. But, don't worry, this is a beginning robotics class. Prior experience is not expected, but returning students are welcome. Each student will build his/her own robotic project, so students can progress and customize at their own pace. In general, in this class, students will spend two weeks assembling, three weeks programming, and two weeks testing and re-designing. Topics in this Series: Maze Runner (Quarter 1), Sumo Bots (Quarter 2), Mars Rover (Quarter 3), and Explore Atlantis (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judith Harmon

    Kids will learn the basics of hand sewing and discover it is "sew fun" to create items that can play with and use every day. Third quarter, kids will sew a small purse or bag, a hat, and a pair of slippers.Kids will learn practical sewing skills such as pinning and placement, a running stitch, attaching a button, scissor skills, stuffing, and working with simple patterns. The group will be working with pre-cut felt components from kits that will be enhanced with buttons and embellishments. Since students may work at different rates, some projects may not be completed in class and will be sent home to finish sewing with the newly learned skills. Students should be at age/grade level for fine motor skills for this class. A material fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this series include: Zookeeper's Critters (Quarter 1), 3D Decor (Quarter 2), Wearable Accessories (Quarter 3), and Cool Characters- Marvel, Star Wars and Disney Princesses (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

    0
    Judith Harmon

    Little kids will learn the basics of hand sewing and discover it is "sew simple" to create fun things they can play with and use every day. Third quarter, kids will sew a slew of silly sea stuffies with fun googly eyes such as a polar bear, a whale, a shark, a sea star, a crab, a fish, and more friends.Kids will learn practical sewing skills such as pinning and placement, a running stitch, attaching a button, scissor skills, and stuffing. The group will be working with pre-cut felt components from kits that will be enhanced with buttons and accessories. Since students may work at different rates, some projects may not be completed in class and will be sent home to finish sewing with the newly learned skills. Students should be at age/grade level for fine motor skills for this class and should be a minimum of age 6. A material fee of $35.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. Topics in this series include: Sewing with a Storybook (Quarter 1), Shareables (Quarter 2), Silly Sea Stuffies (Quarter 3), and Just for Me (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

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    YMCA

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.During the first lesson, students will be observed and determined to be Beginner or Advanced Beginner level, and the class will be divided accordingly among two instructors. Beginners level is for students with little to no swim experience and will cover YMCA Level 1 skills such as water acclimation, floatation, water movement, putting face in the water, swimming 5 feet without a floatation device, and becoming comfortable on back in water. Advanced Beginners level will review all skills in beginner-level class and add YMCA Level 2 skills such as stamina, swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, rotary breathing, becoming comfortable in deep water, and stroke introduction to include: front crawl, backstroke, and elementary breaststroke.Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

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    YMCA

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.Intermediate level is for students who are proficient in Advanced Beginner level skills such as swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, and becoming comfortable in deep water. Intermediate swimmers will cover Levels 3 of the YMCA program including elementary breaststroke, backstroke, front crawl with rotary breathing all at 25 yards, with work towards Level 4 skills including stamina and increasing all swimming to 50 yards or more, plus breast stroke, elementary butterfly stroke and kick, elementary dives, and turns.Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

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    YMCA

    Homeschool Swim Lessons are taught at the Reston YMCA located 0.9 miles/ 3 minute drive from Compass's classroom facility. For more information on swimming lessons, see the program webpage.Intermediate level is for students who are proficient in Advanced Beginner level skills such as swimming one length of the pool (25 yards), performing elementary backstroke, and becoming comfortable in deep water. Intermediate swimmers will cover Levels 3 of the YMCA program including elementary breaststroke, backstroke, front crawl with rotary breathing all at 25 yards, with work towards Level 4 skills including stamina and increasing all swimming to 50 yards or more, plus breast stroke, elementary butterfly stroke and kick, elementary dives, and turns.Please note that these skills will be introduced and progress at different rates depending on the comfortable level and experience of enrolled students and may take more than one quarter to complete. At times, students might be moved to a different swimming group (same day, same time, different instructor) to better match the experience level of enrolled children.Lessons are 40 minutes long, running from 0:05 until 0:45 after the hour, leaving enough time to towel dry, change clothes, and return to Compass for your next class. Students should bring a swimsuit, towel, and change of clothes. Googles and swim caps are optional.A parent (or parent proxy) is required to remain on site. Parents may wait on poolside benches or lobby seating. YMCA waivers must be signed and returned for each swimmer. All registration is completed through Compass. All YMCA swimming classes are taught by certified, experienced, background-checked adult instructors with experience teaching children.Consider enrolling your child in both Tuesday and Thursday classes to improve their rate of learning.

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    Judith Harmon

    Tweens take over as they collectively brainstorm and collaboratively write own play. Find out what happens when tweens "act out" the unique characters and an original storyline they created. What happens when colorful characters have to escape? Will it be a cakewalk for our sherlocks to crack the code, unblock locks, and walk before the clock stops?Students will begin with improvisational games to get to know each other and to begin to brainstorm about their original play. Through group activities and guided discussion, the actors will decide on characters, conflict, and conclusion, and the story they want to tell. The script will be developed and customized for this class with the students' input.The class will learn the practical aspects of acting, as they work on script read-through, blocking, costume/prop design, and planning the show. Students will develop their own "actor's toolkit" of voice, body, and imagination in this creative process! Actors will grow in confidence and communication skills in preparation for a final sharing with parents on the final day of the quarter.Once the script is fully developed with everyone's parts, about half-way through the quarter, it will be emailed to parents. Parents will be expected to help their children memorize their script/lines/cues and assemble a simple make-at-home costume, ideally from clothing items and accessories you already own and a little creativity.Topics in this Series: Haunted House of Horrors (Quarter 1), Chaos in the Courtroom (Quarter 2), No Exit Escape Room (Quarter 3) and Rock Start Rivalry (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

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    Judith Harmon

    Students will become immersed in the imaginary worlds they construct in this unique course that encompasses elements of fiction writing, sociology, and anthropology. Worldbuilding is the foundation of speculative fiction, such as sci-fi and fantasy, role-playing games, videos, comics, and other visual media. Countless examples of Worldbuilding exist in the movies and books we consume every day such as Tolkien's Middle Earth, the many elaborate settlements of the Star Wars franchise, and the popular RPG, Dungeons and Dragons.In this course, students will develop a fictional locale. Will it be a small village in a known place, a new planet, or an original universe? Students will be guided through an interactive, iterative process of "top-down" design of their unique world, determining broad characteristics first then then elaborating with increasing detail. Builders will make coherent and integrated decisions on geography, climate, ecology, flora, fauna, inhabitants, races, history, social customs, language, religion, origin story, powers/magic, legal system, currency, and technology. The class will read excerpts and watch clips of well-known fictional works which will provide strong examples of each of the elements.Second semester, the class will create science fiction-inspired worlds. Students, along with their instructor, will develop an in-class world as an example. Students will use the lessons and exercises reviewed in class to further develop their individual world project.Students will be expected to keep a notebook of decisions and details as they progress through designing the elements of their world. The class will use World Anvil, a web-based subscription service which allows students to create maps, timelines, and other tools to organize their made-up world. Each student will be expected to make a PowerPoint presentation at the end of the semester which addresses each of the built-world elements. Topics in this Series: Fantasy (Semester 1), Science Fiction (Semester 2). Students continuing from first semester receive priority pre-registration for second semester.Prerequisites: NoneWorkload: Students should expect to spend 2 hours per week outside of class.Assignments: Will be posted in a Google ClassroomAssessments: Textbook/Materials: Students will need to create a login and pay for a Master Level subscription to World Anvil (worldanvil.com) for approximately $35.00.Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $15.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class.Non-Meeting Days: None.

    Prerequisites: None

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    Shannon McClain

    Writing is a fundamental skill for school and for life, and it gives kids a voice! In this class, third and fourth graders will explore writing in many different ways. They will learn the basics of good writing and the art of revision. Classes will consist of simple lessons on writing plus in-class writing practice. Students will always be encouraged to write about what interests them, but they will also always be given fun, creative writing prompts so no one feels the panic of figuring out "what to write."Third quarter, students will write fictional stories from a variety of genres. Will their writing include a fairy or a phoenix; witches or wizards; magicians or monsters; distant space or deep sea adventures?The goal for this course is for young students to gain confidence, increase writing fluency, and learn how to incorporate writing into everyday work and play. Each week, the instructor will share brief lessons on grammar such as correct capitalization, agreement, tenses, parts of speech, use of adjectives/adverbs, etc. They will also learn the steps of the writing process: prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing, and strategies for each state. Student must be minimum age 8 to take this class and should be on grade level for reading and handwriting. Topics in this Series: My Memories (Quarter 1); Transforming Tales (Quarter 2), Fun with Fiction (Quarter 3), and Fact Finder (Quarter 4).

    Prerequisites: None

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