Class Registration

UNDER CONSTRUCTION! 2019-20 classes are being uploaded in batches. Please check back for a full list of fall classes on/before May 15. Early registration for fall classes will open at 6:00 am on May 21. Fall classes begin on Sept 6 (Friday classes) and Sept 11 (Wednesday classes). An early registration discount of 10% will be offered for registrations completed through June 15. Registration is a-la-carte, and new families are welcome to enroll.
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Sarah Fraser

Whether college admissions tests (SAT, PSAT, or ACT) are right around the corner or down the road, this class will teach you how to tackle the tests, decode the questions, and boost your scores. While SAT/ACT test scores are not automatic ticket into the college of your choice, higher scores will get your application in the to-be-considered pile where admissions staff will take a closer look at all the other amazing things you have done. This class will help you feel prepared to face standardized admissions tests and take away some of the worry and mystery that surround these assessments. Each week, students will spend time on strategies for math and English portions of the tests. Students will learn about test designs and the types and difficulty levels of reading, grammar, and math questions. The class will learn how to approach multiple choice questions, how to read passages for comprehension, and what to do when you don t know an answer. This class is not a crash course that preps you for one test sitting, but rather teaches you lasting techniques to get you ready for whenever you decide to take a standardized test. The instructor will lay out a study plan for test-ready students and be able to offer tips on many aspects of the college admissions process. When the class wraps up, students and parents will understand the process of SAT and ACT testing and feel prepared for the personal challenge of the test experience. Topics in this Series: Success Skills for School: High School and Beyond (Semester 2). Prerequisites: For this class, students should be reading and have comprehension at or above grade level and have completed Algebra I. While geometry is included on the tests, completion of geometry is not assumed. Geometry formulas are provided within the tests, and the instructor will teach how to find and apply those formulas. Workload: /b> Students should expect to spend one hour per week on homework for this class. Assignments: Prior to the start of class, each student should have taken a scored, practice SAT or ACT exam (found on the College Board or ACT website). All other assignments will be made in class and e-mailed to parents/students. Assessments: Students will take a variety of in-class and at-home time, practice test sections. The instructor will not provide additional assessments beyond the practice tests. Textbook: Students should purchase either The Official SAT Study Guide, 2019 Edition, published by the College Board (2018 ISBN # 978-1457309281), when published, or the The Official ACT Prep Guide, 2019-20 Edition (2018-19 ISBN #978-1119508069), when published. What to Bring: Students should bring their test book, notebook/paper, and a TI-83 or equivalent calculator to class to practice math questions that permit the use of a calculator. Phone calculators cannot be used. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) elective credit purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
Taliesin Knol

This class will explore the judicial processes of the ancient world, starting with Ancient Greece. Students will learn how justice was carried out in a time before codified written legal systems, prisons, lawyers, or even formal judges existed and where the facts of your case depended entirely on how well your rhetoric could convince hundreds of your fellow citizens that would serve on a jury. Like a traditional mock trial program, the class will hear cases, and students will defend themselves, but will be expected to do so as an Ancient Greek citizen would have, through open debate. Real historical cases will be studied and trial parts assigned to the class, which will be expected to debate from the perspective of both citizen and non-citizen residents of an ancient Polis. The class will serve as the jury and, if necessary, select period-appropriate verdicts and explain how they arrived at their decisions.
Topics in this Series: Roman law, From Republic to Empire (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: The cost of photocopied class documents is included in the course fee.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History or Civics for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
Mimi Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer Cream of Asparagus Soup Fall Twist Cobb Salad Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries Pumpkin Trifle Dessert Chicken Posole Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flare (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
David Chelf

This is a complete course in high school Geometry which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Students will learn deductive reasoning, and logic by completing geometric proofs. Topics in geometry include: lines, angles, congruence, concurrence, inequalities, parallel lines, quadrilaterals, transformations, area, similarity, right triangles, circles, regular polygons, and geometric solids. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student s progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student s progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: The required textbook for this class is Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding, 3rd edition (ISBN-10 0716743612, ISBN-13 978-0716743613) A calculator is not necessary for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Geometry for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: Algebra I

0
David Chelf

This is a complete course in Algebra II which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Algebra II include linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational and irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic relations and systems. In addition, this course will cover higher degree functions with complex numbers, sequences and series, probability, data analysis, and trigonometric and circular functions. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student s progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student s progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: The required textbook for this class is Algebra and Trigonometry: Functions and Applications- Prentice Hall Classics (ISBN-10 0131657100, ISBN-13 978-0131657106). A scientific calculator similar to the TI-83 is required for this class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra II for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: Algebra I

0
Mimi Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer Cream of Asparagus Soup Fall Twist Cobb Salad Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries Pumpkin Trifle Dessert Chicken Posole Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flare (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
Heather Sanderson

Read it! Act it! Students will enjoy this two-hour, semester-long workshop with Shakespearian coach Heather Sanderson who hails from England and is known for instilling a love of Shakespeare into the hearts of students throughout the Greater DC area. The class will explore Shakespeare's timeless romantic comedy, The Winter s Tale, and analyze its characters, plot, themes and motives. Students will voyage to the shores of Sicilia to take on the personas of Kings Leontes and Polixenes, Queen Hermione, courtiers Camillo, Paulina, and Antigonus. A kindly shepherd, a wise oracle, a clown, and a young girl make up the cast of characters in this mixed-up tale of jealousy, intrigue, revenge, and redemption. Students will read various roles, study and act out scenes, practice monologues, and work through the literature while having fun with fellow teens. Theatre games will be used to encourage collaboration, and specially designed improv exercises will be used to stretch teens' imaginations and help them get "in character". The class will use read-aloud and in-class dramatization to decipher the original language, word choices, and to identify humor, satire, mockery, betrayal, and rejection in this mixed-up comedic tale of mistaken identity. The class will work from complete texts (not redacted, abridged, or simplified school versions) to hear and practice Elizabethan lingo. (How did someone of Shakespeare's time hurl insults or woo a woman?) Students will learn how the Bard crafted scenes and conveyed the primary storyline and sub-plots in a dark tale that has endured for over 400 years. Instructor Heather Sanderson shares a teaching style based on actions and interactions, developed from years of experience coaching Shakespeare in a way that appeals to students. Her approach brings abstract concepts, complex themes, and difficult language to the students' level, so that they can relate to and appreciate Shakespeare.Topics in this Series: Shakespeare Off the Page: The Winter's Tale (Semester 1), Shakespeare Off the Page: Death by Shakespeare (Quarter 3), and Shakespeare's Famous Re-Writes of English History: Antony & Cleopatra (Quarter 4). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hour per week outside of class reading sections. Assignments: Sections will be assigned in class and included in the weekly e-mail to parents/students. Assessments: Will not be given. Textbook: The cost of the class text is included in the course fee. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in English Literature or Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
Taliesin Knol

This class will re-enact the great unseen intelligence battles of early American history, from Washington s spies to Lincoln and Jefferson Davis s, using RPGs (role playing games similar to Dungeons and Dragons) custom designed by the instructor. Real spying is less James Bond and more Sherlock Holmes. You follow clues and codes to lead you to secrets your enemies wish you didn t know. Every country has secrets, and those must be defended, because knowing is half the battle. Students will be expected to learn about and practice code breaking, and try to encode messages to pass to their colleagues. Success will bring great advantage, failure could mean capture and death! We will examine the lives and techniques of real historical spies, adopt their methods and replicate them for ourselves, pitting one half of the class against the other using modified versions of the Pathfinder story-driven role playing system. Once you ve uncovered the enemy s secrets, we will attempt to make use of this stolen information and learn just how much power there is in knowledge. Topics in this Series: American Espionage, from the Revolution to the Civil War (Semester 1) and Modern American Spying, WWII through the Cold War (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
Taliesin Knol

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top seas, deploy dozens of miniature ships and planes... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!The Second World War was a titanic struggle across the entire planet, but our planet is 71% water which means that the fight happened there too! No real empire could hope to dominate the world without also controlling the seas, using massive steel castles with the largest guns ever made, in concert with airplanes hunting targets from hundreds of miles away and deadly submarines beneath the waves. This class will use scale warships to re-enact the key naval battles of WWII as they happened, scouting vast trackless ocean to find the enemy fleet before they find you! In doing so we will learn about the technology and economic drivers that allowed different nations navies to operate and how that affected the war s outcome from the immense shipyards of America to the submarine pens of Nazi occupied Europe. Topics in this Series: Naval Battles of WWII (Semester 1) and The Forgotten Fronts (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
Mimi Nyman

Students will enjoy making savory fall recipes and cool weather comfort foods that feature a variety of fruits, vegetables, and fresh ingredients. Fall Favorites are selected to be nutritious, fun, and simple to make. Each class will focus on a portion of a meal including appetizer, salad, soup, side dish, main dish, and dessert. The Compass chefs' culinary adventures will include: Fresh Herbed Brie Boule Appetizer Cream of Asparagus Soup Fall Twist Cobb Salad Penne with Ricotta, Eggs, and Autumn Veggies Roasted Chicken with Apples, Pears, and Cherries Pumpkin Trifle Dessert Chicken Posole Students will be eating what they make each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging cooking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen, experimenting, and trying new foods. Students will be exposed to healthy ingredients they may not regularly eat. They will learn important kitchen skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary and terms are introduced each week, with no-pressure verbal review of those words the following week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a group. Students will be asked to bring an apron and plastic storage container with a tight fitting lid. There is a $40.00 material fee for this course payable to the instructor on the first day. Topics in this Series: Fall Fare with Flare (Quarter 1), Festive Fall Flavors (Quarter 2), Winter Warm-Ups (Quarter 3), Savory Spring Specialties (Quarter 4). Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
David Chelf

This is a complete course in PreCalculus which will cover fundamental concepts and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. Topics in Precalculs include functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric (right angle and unit circle). In addition, the course will cover polar coordinates, parametric equations, analytic trigonometry, vectors, systems of equations/inequalities, conic sections, sequences, and series. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student s progress and workload. In lieu of a graphing calculator, students should have access to websites desmos.com and wolframalpha.com for graphing assignments.Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student s progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: The required textbooks for this class are Precalculus: Mathematics for Calculus, 6th edition by Stewart, Redlin, and Watson (ISBN-10 0840068077, ISBN-13 978-0840068071) and the downloadable Stitz-Zeager Precalculus, Preliminary 4th edition (www.stitz-zeager.com/Precalculus4.pdf) A scientific calculator similar to the TI-83 is required for this class. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Precalculus for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: Algebra I, II, Geometry

0
John Waldron

Imagine a scene on a long airplane flight, in a Chinese restaurant, at an awkward class reunion, a doctor's waiting room, a kooky family reunion, an English pub, a football game, or even the mall. Envision those scenarios all in one zany production, as a collection of one-minute plays! The class will race through at least twenty super-short scripts featuring a range of zany mini stories. The class will cast, practice, and perform them in a rapid-fire form called tiny theater and flash fiction. One-minute plays are popular around the country in venues such as college theater, indie stage, and countless festivals such as the annual Gone in 60 Seconds event. New and returning acting students will have fun and be challenged to think on their feet with the rapid-fire pace of these super-short plays as they connect with the audience, bring their character to life, and tell their story... in just one minute. Students will change characters and plots in quick succession and have to bring the audience along with them. If they forget a line, they ll improvise! From story to story, students will develop clever transitions and sequence the short scenes to a coherent class production. In this class, actors will learn the art of a cold read in front of a director. If a student would like to write a script for the class, he/she should bring a hard copy to the first day of class to review and edit with the instructor before the script is offered to the class. The students will perform for family and friends at the end of the quarter. This class is best suited for students who are active listeners, are flexible and easily adapt, have a sense of humor, and can work in a collaborative group. Students need to be able to stay in sync with the flow of the class. This is not an "anything goes" or free-for-all class. Topics in this Series: Wednesday Afternoon Live (Quarter 2); Long Form Improv (Quarter 3); and Mystery on Demand (Quarter 4). Taken these classes before? No problem, you can take them again as improv-based acting will be a new and different experience every time! Workload: Students should expect to spend 1 hour per week outside of class learning his/her lines. Assignments: Parts will be assigned in class. Assessments: Will not be given. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Fine Arts for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
David Chelf

This is a complete course in Algebra I which will cover fundamental concepts in algebra and provide a solid foundation of mathematical literacy, problem solving, reasoning, and critical thinking skills that are necessary for the exploration of more advanced and rigorous topics in mathematics. This course is designed to emphasize the study of algebraic problem-solving with the incorporation real world applications. Topics in Algebra I include number systems, linear systems, rational numbers, complex numbers, exponents, roots, radicals, quadratic equations, polynomials, factoring, absolute values, ratios, and proportions. In addition, the course will cover solving and graphing systems of functions, linear equations, and inequalities. Students will explore these topics through class discussions, practice problems, and open-ended problem solving. Prerequisite: Students should have a solid foundation in pre-algebra topics in order to take this class. Workload: Students should expect to spend 1.25-1.75 hours per day on reading, review, and homework on most non-class days. Homework assignments will run on a 13-day cycle in this class with: a new unit introduced on a Friday (day 1), lecture on Wednesday (day 6), questions and answers on the next Friday (day 8), and homework due the next Wednesday (day 13). After introduction of a new topic (day 1), students will be expected to read the assigned section and look through worked, sample problems before the lecture the following Wednesday (day 6). Solutions will be provided for some homework problems, but students are expected to show all steps of all work. Assignments: The Canvas online class management system will be used to post assignments and scores. Students should have their own e-mail address to be set up users of the Canvas system. Parents can also be set up as Canvas guests/observers for purposes of tracking the student s progress and workload. Assessments: In this class, the instructor will assess a student s progress by: checking that weekly homework sets are complete; spot-checking the full solution 1-2 select problems in class each week, and giving quarterly take-home tests. Points will also be awarded for class participation. Parents will be able to view accumulated points awarded in the class for purpose of determining a parent-awarded course grade. Textbook: The required textbooks for this class are (1) Practical Algebra: A Self-Teaching Guide, 2nd edition paperback- new copy recommended- (ISBN-10 0471530123, ISBN-13 978-0471530121) and (2) A-Plus Notes for Beginning Algebra: Pre-Algebra and Algebra 1 (ISBN-10 0965435229, ISBN-13 978-0965435222). A calculator is not necessary for this course. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a complete credit in Algebra I for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: Pre-Algebra

0
Kati Andresen

The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts. Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Compass bakers will learn to prepare a variety of desserts for friends and family, as an everyday treat or for holidays, birthdays, and other special occasions. Each quarter, students will create a range of desserts including a pie, a cake, a tray bake, cookies, a tart, a mousse or pudding, and a chocolate (plus, a frozen dessert in 8-week quarters). The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers culinary adventures will include: Fall Harvest Apple Pie Orange Cake with Orange Buttercream Traditional Brownies and Black Bean Brownies Chocolate and Vanilla Pinwheels Chocolate Tarts Boston Cream Pie Trifle Truffles Students will be eating what they bake each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging baking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group. Topics in this Series: Delectable Desserts (Quarter 1); Innovative Indulgences (Quarter 2), Decadent Delights (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

0
Taliesin Knol

Why read about key military battles on maps or in books when you can learn about them hands-on, in three dimensions, using historical miniature gaming? In 3D History, pivotal engagements come alive for new and experienced students, as they navigate a table-top seas, deploy dozens of miniature ships and planes... all while playing a military strategy game. Each student will have the opportunity to fight a battle from both sides, allowing them to test various strategies, try multiple scenarios, predict different outcomes, and rewrite history- an effective way to gain a deeper understanding of what actually happened and why!The Second World War was a titanic struggle across the entire planet, but our planet is 71% water which means that the fight happened there too! No real empire could hope to dominate the world without also controlling the seas, using massive steel castles with the largest guns ever made, in concert with airplanes hunting targets from hundreds of miles away and deadly submarines beneath the waves. This class will use scale warships to re-enact the key naval battles of WWII as they happened, scouting vast trackless ocean to find the enemy fleet before they find you! In doing so we will learn about the technology and economic drivers that allowed different nations navies to operate and how that affected the war s outcome from the immense shipyards of America to the submarine pens of Nazi occupied Europe. Topics in this Series: Naval Battles of WWII (Semester 1) and The Forgotten Fronts (Semester 2). Workload: Students should expect to spend 0-1 hours per week outside of class. Assignments: Google Drive (period maps, photographs and recreations) and YouTube (videos) links will be e-mailed to parents/students for homework or supplemental investigation.Assessments: Will not be given.Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in History for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

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Kati Andresen

The tantalizing aroma of cookies in the oven. A mouth-watering burst of mint. The silky feel of melted chocolate. The sticky sweet of fresh-made caramel. A subtle hint of lemon. Student bakers will enjoy these delicious sensations- and more- as they explore the world of baking homemade desserts. Sweet Shop treats are scrumptious, fun, and simple to make. Compass bakers will learn to prepare a variety of desserts for friends and family, as an everyday treat or for holidays, birthdays, and other special occasions. Each quarter, students will create a range of desserts including a pie, a cake, a tray bake, cookies, a tart, a mousse or pudding, and a chocolate (plus, a frozen dessert in 8-week quarters). The class will include some icing, decorating, and garnishing techniques for completed desserts. This quarter, the Compass bakers culinary adventures will include: Fall Harvest Apple Pie Orange Cake with Orange Buttercream Traditional Brownies and Black Bean Brownies Chocolate and Vanilla Pinwheels Chocolate Tarts Boston Cream Pie Trifle Truffles Students will be eating what they bake each week and bringing home the recipes and leftovers. These engaging baking classes will get students excited about helping in the kitchen and entertaining. They will learn important baking skills such as safety, sanitation, measuring, knife skills, and other tricks of the trade. Culinary vocabulary is introduced each week. Notes: Sorry, but students with allergies to food ingredients or dietary restrictions cannot be accommodated in this class. Recipes may contain dairy, wheat, gluten, and eggs. While no nuts are included in recipes, ingredients may come from factories or machinery that also process nuts. This class is best suited for students who can follow instructions, complete sequential tasks, and work in a small group. Topics in this Series: Delectable Desserts (Quarter 1); Innovative Indulgences (Quarter 2), Decadent Delights (Quarter 3), and Casual Confections (Quarter 4).Assessments: Will not be given. Lab/Supply Fee: A class fee of $40.00 is due payable to the instructor on the first day of class. What to Bring: A clean apron and plastic storage container with a tight-fitting lid for leftovers. What to Wear: Students should wear clean clothes and a bandana or have long hair tied back or braided. Credit: Homeschool families may wish to count this course as a component (partial) credit in Career/Technical for purposes of a high school transcript.

Prerequisites: None

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